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  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
jmcquown
 
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Default Trying to Salvage Frozen Food

Some time during the night my almost 20 year old refrigerator decided to
die. It stopped cooling 2-3 years ago but if I hit it in the right spot the
compressor would kick in again. Then after that it just started working all
by itself again. No such luck this time.

I brought my own refrigerator to this apartment but they are going to have
maintenance bring me a replacement. Sadly, the replacement refrigerator is
tiny (14 cu. ft); not that mine was huge but you'd be surprised what a
difference 4 cu. ft. makes.

Meanwhile, all my frozen stuff is almost completely thawed out. I have it
in a cooler with ice and will try to salvage as much of it as I can. What a
pain in the a** this is! At least it answers the question about what to do
with my leftover dressing... throw it away LOL

OB Food: not sure I'll have any

Jill


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Nancy Young
 
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Default Trying to Salvage Frozen Food


"jmcquown" > wrote

> I brought my own refrigerator to this apartment but they are going to have
> maintenance bring me a replacement. Sadly, the replacement refrigerator
> is
> tiny (14 cu. ft); not that mine was huge but you'd be surprised what a
> difference 4 cu. ft. makes.


Man, that's a huge difference.

Do you know of a scratch and dent place? You can get a new
refrigerator, full warranty/whatever, for a very reasonable
amount of money.

nancy


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jmcquown
 
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Default Trying to Salvage Frozen Food

Nancy Young wrote:
> "jmcquown" > wrote
>
>> I brought my own refrigerator to this apartment but they are going
>> to have maintenance bring me a replacement. Sadly, the replacement
>> refrigerator is
>> tiny (14 cu. ft); not that mine was huge but you'd be surprised what
>> a difference 4 cu. ft. makes.

>
> Man, that's a huge difference.
>
> Do you know of a scratch and dent place? You can get a new
> refrigerator, full warranty/whatever, for a very reasonable
> amount of money.
>
> nancy


Thanks, I'll check around. In the meantine I have to do something *now*,
which precludes driving around looking at refrigerators. The apartment
fridge option is the best for the moment.

Jill


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Ophelia
 
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Default Trying to Salvage Frozen Food


"jmcquown" > wrote in message
. ..
> Nancy Young wrote:
>> "jmcquown" > wrote
>>
>>> I brought my own refrigerator to this apartment but they are going
>>> to have maintenance bring me a replacement. Sadly, the replacement
>>> refrigerator is
>>> tiny (14 cu. ft); not that mine was huge but you'd be surprised what
>>> a difference 4 cu. ft. makes.

>>
>> Man, that's a huge difference.
>>
>> Do you know of a scratch and dent place? You can get a new
>> refrigerator, full warranty/whatever, for a very reasonable
>> amount of money.
>>
>> nancy

>
> Thanks, I'll check around. In the meantine I have to do something
> *now*,
> which precludes driving around looking at refrigerators. The
> apartment
> fridge option is the best for the moment.


Cook it all and throw a party?


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zxcvbob
 
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Default Trying to Salvage Frozen Food

jmcquown wrote:
> Nancy Young wrote:
>
>>"jmcquown" > wrote
>>
>>
>>>I brought my own refrigerator to this apartment but they are going
>>>to have maintenance bring me a replacement. Sadly, the replacement
>>>refrigerator is
>>>tiny (14 cu. ft); not that mine was huge but you'd be surprised what
>>>a difference 4 cu. ft. makes.

>>
>>Man, that's a huge difference.
>>
>>Do you know of a scratch and dent place? You can get a new
>>refrigerator, full warranty/whatever, for a very reasonable
>>amount of money.
>>
>>nancy

>
>
> Thanks, I'll check around. In the meantine I have to do something *now*,
> which precludes driving around looking at refrigerators. The apartment
> fridge option is the best for the moment.
>
> Jill




What's the temperature outside in Memphis? 40-50's? (sit the coolers
out on the patio and they'll do a lot better job for you while you're
getting situated.)

You might wanna look for a small chest freezer. When I lived in a small
apartment, I had the biggest freezer that would fit thru the walk-in
closet door (Montgomery Wards, about 6 ft^3) I still have that freezer
20 years later, in addition to a bigger upright.

Good luck,
Bob


  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Nancy Young
 
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Default Trying to Salvage Frozen Food


"jmcquown" > wrote

> Nancy Young wrote:


>> Do you know of a scratch and dent place? You can get a new
>> refrigerator, full warranty/whatever, for a very reasonable
>> amount of money.


> Thanks, I'll check around. In the meantine I have to do something *now*,


Yes, I understand that, it wasn't meant to fix your immediate
food problem.

> which precludes driving around looking at refrigerators. The apartment
> fridge option is the best for the moment.


Of course. Goes without saying.

nancy


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jmcquown
 
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Default Trying to Salvage Frozen Food

zxcvbob wrote:
> jmcquown wrote:
>> Nancy Young wrote:
>>
>>> "jmcquown" > wrote
>>>
>>>
>>>> I brought my own refrigerator to this apartment but they are going
>>>> to have maintenance bring me a replacement. Sadly, the replacement
>>>> refrigerator is
>>>> tiny (14 cu. ft); not that mine was huge but you'd be surprised
>>>> what
>>>> a difference 4 cu. ft. makes.
>>>
>>> Man, that's a huge difference.
>>>
>>> Do you know of a scratch and dent place? You can get a new
>>> refrigerator, full warranty/whatever, for a very reasonable
>>> amount of money.
>>>
>>> nancy

>>
>>
>> Thanks, I'll check around. In the meantine I have to do something
>> *now*, which precludes driving around looking at refrigerators. The
>> apartment fridge option is the best for the moment.
>>
>> Jill

>
>
>
> What's the temperature outside in Memphis? 40-50's? (sit the coolers
> out on the patio and they'll do a lot better job for you while you're
> getting situated.)
>

Happens to be a nice, sunny 52 at the moment

> You might wanna look for a small chest freezer. When I lived in a
> small apartment, I had the biggest freezer that would fit thru the
> walk-in closet door (Montgomery Wards, about 6 ft^3) I still have
> that freezer 20 years later, in addition to a bigger upright.
>
> Good luck,
> Bob


Thanks, Bob. I nearly bought one about 6 years ago and still kick myself
for not doing it.

Jill


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Wayne Boatwright
 
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Default Trying to Salvage Frozen Food

On Thu 29 Dec 2005 11:58:29a, jmcquown wrote in rec.food.cooking:

> Some time during the night my almost 20 year old refrigerator decided to
> die. It stopped cooling 2-3 years ago but if I hit it in the right spot
> the compressor would kick in again. Then after that it just started
> working all by itself again. No such luck this time.
>
> I brought my own refrigerator to this apartment but they are going to
> have maintenance bring me a replacement. Sadly, the replacement
> refrigerator is tiny (14 cu. ft); not that mine was huge but you'd be
> surprised what a difference 4 cu. ft. makes.
>
> Meanwhile, all my frozen stuff is almost completely thawed out. I have
> it in a cooler with ice and will try to salvage as much of it as I can.
> What a pain in the a** this is! At least it answers the question about
> what to do with my leftover dressing... throw it away LOL
>
> OB Food: not sure I'll have any


How awful, Jill! Bet you wish you had bought that freezer a couple of
years ago. :-(

Is all of your frozen stuff thawed or can it be put into the freezer? If
not completely thawed, you could buy some dry ice to put in the cooler
instead of regular ice. That would preserve it until you get the new unit
in place.

--
Wayne Boatwright **
____________________________________________

Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
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elaine
 
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Default Trying to Salvage Frozen Food

"Nancy Young" > wrote in message
...
>
> "jmcquown" > wrote
>
>> Nancy Young wrote:

>
>>> Do you know of a scratch and dent place? You can get a new
>>> refrigerator, full warranty/whatever, for a very reasonable
>>> amount of money.

>
>> Thanks, I'll check around. In the meantine I have to do something *now*,

>
> Yes, I understand that, it wasn't meant to fix your immediate
> food problem.



Yuk, I feel for you. I babied my ailing fridge along for almost 3 months.
Numerous trips back and forth to the small fridge and freezer down in the
basement when it conked out unexpectedly.

Mine wasn't that old in fridge years - perhaps 7; so I really wasn't to give
up on it.

Long story short -- and $230 later, the fridge person came and replaced a
part. Damn, for another $250 I could have bought a new fridge. BTW - the
fridge person advised me to buy cheap since fridge parts go really quickly.
I'll keep that in mind.

E.


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jmcquown
 
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Default Trying to Salvage Frozen Food

Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> On Thu 29 Dec 2005 11:58:29a, jmcquown wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>
>> Some time during the night my almost 20 year old refrigerator
>> decided to die. It stopped cooling 2-3 years ago but if I hit it in
>> the right spot the compressor would kick in again. Then after that
>> it just started working all by itself again. No such luck this time.
>>
>> I brought my own refrigerator to this apartment but they are going to
>> have maintenance bring me a replacement. Sadly, the replacement
>> refrigerator is tiny (14 cu. ft); not that mine was huge but you'd be
>> surprised what a difference 4 cu. ft. makes.
>>
>> Meanwhile, all my frozen stuff is almost completely thawed out. I
>> have it in a cooler with ice and will try to salvage as much of it
>> as I can. What a pain in the a** this is! At least it answers the
>> question about what to do with my leftover dressing... throw it away
>> LOL
>>
>> OB Food: not sure I'll have any

>
> How awful, Jill! Bet you wish you had bought that freezer a couple of
> years ago. :-(
>

You bet I do!

> Is all of your frozen stuff thawed or can it be put into the freezer?


Some of the stuff still had some ice crystals on it but the tilapia and bay
scallops will have to be dinner tonight (what a shame LOL).

> If not completely thawed, you could buy some dry ice to put in the
> cooler instead of regular ice. That would preserve it until you get
> the new unit in place.


Hmmm. Wonder where I'd have to go for that? I'll check for the next time.




  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
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jmcquown
 
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Default UPDATE and REQ: Trying to Salvage Frozen Food

jmcquown wrote:
> Some time during the night my almost 20 year old refrigerator decided
> to die. It stopped cooling 2-3 years ago but if I hit it in the
> right spot the compressor would kick in again. Then after that it
> just started working all by itself again. No such luck this time.
>
> Jill


This is a hell of a way to clean out the fridge The maintenance man
brought the replacement fridge. It's larger (15.6 cu. ft) than the one they
took out of here when I moved in, thank goodness! But of course I hate it!
The shelves are too close together and aren't adjustable; my "egg basket"
doesn't fit on the shelf on the door (of course there *isn't* a built-in
place on the door for eggs). Worst of all, the doors open in the opposite
direction from what I've been used to for nearly 20 years! LOL That is
going to take some getting used to.

Anyway, I have to cook the tilapia and the bay scallops tonight. I wasn't
exactly prepared to do that so I'm not sure what treatment I'll give them
yet. I usually dredge tilapia in Zatarain's fish fry coating and pan fry
them. Not a problem.

Other than sauteeing the bay scallops in butter (which is perfectly
delicious and fine with me) does anyone have any simple suggestions that
don't require a lot of stuff (since I lost a lot of stuff LOL)?

Before you start, I don't have any wine with which to deglaze and make a
lovely sauce. I don't have any half & half. The little bit of milk I had
was warm when I discovered the problem with the fridge so I dumped it. I
*do* have canned evaporated milk but... I suppose I could go to the store,
but after the events of today I'm a little worn out. As ChrisD could tell
you, I had every intention of going to buy wine & champagne for New Year's
Eve today but I don't even feel like doing *that* LOL

Jill


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Wayne Boatwright
 
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Default Trying to Salvage Frozen Food

On Thu 29 Dec 2005 02:49:16p, jmcquown wrote in rec.food.cooking:

> Wayne Boatwright wrote:
>> On Thu 29 Dec 2005 11:58:29a, jmcquown wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>>
>>> Some time during the night my almost 20 year old refrigerator
>>> decided to die. It stopped cooling 2-3 years ago but if I hit it in
>>> the right spot the compressor would kick in again. Then after that
>>> it just started working all by itself again. No such luck this time.
>>>
>>> I brought my own refrigerator to this apartment but they are going to
>>> have maintenance bring me a replacement. Sadly, the replacement
>>> refrigerator is tiny (14 cu. ft); not that mine was huge but you'd be
>>> surprised what a difference 4 cu. ft. makes.
>>>
>>> Meanwhile, all my frozen stuff is almost completely thawed out. I
>>> have it in a cooler with ice and will try to salvage as much of it
>>> as I can. What a pain in the a** this is! At least it answers the
>>> question about what to do with my leftover dressing... throw it away
>>> LOL
>>>
>>> OB Food: not sure I'll have any

>>
>> How awful, Jill! Bet you wish you had bought that freezer a couple of
>> years ago. :-(
>>

> You bet I do!
>
>> Is all of your frozen stuff thawed or can it be put into the freezer?

>
> Some of the stuff still had some ice crystals on it but the tilapia and
> bay scallops will have to be dinner tonight (what a shame LOL).
>
>> If not completely thawed, you could buy some dry ice to put in the
>> cooler instead of regular ice. That would preserve it until you get
>> the new unit in place.

>
> Hmmm. Wonder where I'd have to go for that? I'll check for the next
> time.


I don't know about Memphis, but all of our supermarkets here in the
Phoenix area carry it.

--
Wayne Boatwright **
____________________________________________

Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
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zxcvbob
 
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Default Trying to Salvage Frozen Food

Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> On Thu 29 Dec 2005 02:49:16p, jmcquown wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>
>
>>Wayne Boatwright wrote:
>>


>>>If not completely thawed, you could buy some dry ice to put in the
>>>cooler instead of regular ice. That would preserve it until you get
>>>the new unit in place.

>>
>>Hmmm. Wonder where I'd have to go for that? I'll check for the next
>>time.

>
>
> I don't know about Memphis, but all of our supermarkets here in the
> Phoenix area carry it.
>



It's usually available wherever they refill fire extinguishers. Check
the Yellow Pages for "Dry Ice" and for "Fire Extinguishers". The next
place to check is welding suppliers, and then creameries.

Best regards,
Bob
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sf
 
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Default Trying to Salvage Frozen Food

My old upright decided to pick this week to die too. We threw out the
contents last night. The garage where it resides now is filled with
remodeling supplies and equipment, so we won't be replacing it very
soon.
```````````````````````

On Thu, 29 Dec 2005 14:44:04 -0600, jmcquown wrote:

> zxcvbob wrote:
> > jmcquown wrote:
> >> Nancy Young wrote:
> >>
> >>> "jmcquown" > wrote
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>> I brought my own refrigerator to this apartment but they are going
> >>>> to have maintenance bring me a replacement. Sadly, the replacement
> >>>> refrigerator is
> >>>> tiny (14 cu. ft); not that mine was huge but you'd be surprised
> >>>> what
> >>>> a difference 4 cu. ft. makes.
> >>>
> >>> Man, that's a huge difference.
> >>>
> >>> Do you know of a scratch and dent place? You can get a new
> >>> refrigerator, full warranty/whatever, for a very reasonable
> >>> amount of money.
> >>>
> >>> nancy
> >>
> >>
> >> Thanks, I'll check around. In the meantine I have to do something
> >> *now*, which precludes driving around looking at refrigerators. The
> >> apartment fridge option is the best for the moment.
> >>
> >> Jill

> >
> >
> >
> > What's the temperature outside in Memphis? 40-50's? (sit the coolers
> > out on the patio and they'll do a lot better job for you while you're
> > getting situated.)
> >

> Happens to be a nice, sunny 52 at the moment
>
> > You might wanna look for a small chest freezer. When I lived in a
> > small apartment, I had the biggest freezer that would fit thru the
> > walk-in closet door (Montgomery Wards, about 6 ft^3) I still have
> > that freezer 20 years later, in addition to a bigger upright.
> >
> > Good luck,
> > Bob

>
> Thanks, Bob. I nearly bought one about 6 years ago and still kick myself
> for not doing it.
>
> Jill
>


--

Practice safe eating. Always use condiments.
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sf
 
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Default Trying to Salvage Frozen Food

On Thu, 29 Dec 2005 15:49:16 -0600, jmcquown wrote:

> Wayne Boatwright wrote:


> > If not completely thawed, you could buy some dry ice to put in the
> > cooler instead of regular ice. That would preserve it until you get
> > the new unit in place.

>
> Hmmm. Wonder where I'd have to go for that? I'll check for the next time.
>

We have a commercial ice producer here in the city and that's where I
get my dry ice. Who supplies the bags of ice to your local 7-11?
--

Practice safe eating. Always use condiments.


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Posted to rec.food.cooking
Puester
 
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Default Trying to Salvage Frozen Food


> On Thu 29 Dec 2005 11:58:29a, jmcquown wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>
>
>>Some time during the night my almost 20 year old refrigerator decided to
>>die. It stopped cooling 2-3 years ago but if I hit it in the right spot
>>the compressor would kick in again. Then after that it just started
>>working all by itself again. No such luck this time.
>>
>>I brought my own refrigerator to this apartment but they are going to
>>have maintenance bring me a replacement. Sadly, the replacement
>>refrigerator is tiny (14 cu. ft); not that mine was huge but you'd be
>>surprised what a difference 4 cu. ft. makes.
>>
>>Meanwhile, all my frozen stuff is almost completely thawed out. I have
>>it in a cooler with ice and will try to salvage as much of it as I can.
>>What a pain in the a** this is! At least it answers the question about
>>what to do with my leftover dressing... throw it away LOL
>>
>>OB Food: not sure I'll have any

>



Ugh. How much of the food can you cook then refreeze?

gloria p
whose fingers are all crossed that our 32 yr. old
upright freezer in the garage will last forever.
  #17 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
Dan Abel
 
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Default UPDATE and REQ: Trying to Salvage Frozen Food

In article >,
"jmcquown" > wrote:


> place on the door for eggs). Worst of all, the doors open in the opposite
> direction from what I've been used to for nearly 20 years! LOL That is
> going to take some getting used to.



Nearly all fridges are designed so that the handles and hinges can be
mounted on either side. I have no idea how hard that is or how long it
takes.

If you are going to have this fridge for long, it might be worth
checking into. It's never mattered to me, but if you think about some
possible kitchen layouts, it's essential to have the door open in a
certain way.

--
Dan Abel

Petaluma, California, USA
  #18 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
Sheldon
 
Posts: n/a
Default Trying to Salvage Frozen Food


jmcquown wrote:
> Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> > On Thu 29 Dec 2005 11:58:29a, jmcquown wrote in rec.food.cooking:
> >
> >> Some time during the night my almost 20 year old refrigerator
> >> decided to die. It stopped cooling 2-3 years ago but if I hit it in
> >> the right spot the compressor would kick in again. Then after that
> >> it just started working all by itself again. No such luck this time.
> >>
> >> I brought my own refrigerator to this apartment but they are going to
> >> have maintenance bring me a replacement. Sadly, the replacement
> >> refrigerator is tiny (14 cu. ft); not that mine was huge but you'd be
> >> surprised what a difference 4 cu. ft. makes.
> >>
> >> Meanwhile, all my frozen stuff is almost completely thawed out. I
> >> have it in a cooler with ice and will try to salvage as much of it
> >> as I can. What a pain in the a** this is! At least it answers the
> >> question about what to do with my leftover dressing... throw it away
> >> LOL
> >>
> >> OB Food: not sure I'll have any

> >
> > How awful, Jill! Bet you wish you had bought that freezer a couple of
> > years ago. :-(
> >

> You bet I do!
>
> > Is all of your frozen stuff thawed or can it be put into the freezer?

>
> Some of the stuff still had some ice crystals on it but the tilapia and bay
> scallops will have to be dinner tonight (what a shame LOL).
>
> > If not completely thawed, you could buy some dry ice to put in the
> > cooler instead of regular ice. That would preserve it until you get
> > the new unit in place.

>
> Hmmm. Wonder where I'd have to go for that? I'll check for the next time.


Yellow Pages

Everyone should have the location of the nearest ice house taped to
their fridge, very useful for power outages.

  #19 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
jmcquown
 
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Default Trying to Salvage Frozen Food

Puester wrote:
>> On Thu 29 Dec 2005 11:58:29a, jmcquown wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>>
>>
>>> Some time during the night my almost 20 year old refrigerator
>>> decided to die. It stopped cooling 2-3 years ago but if I hit it
>>> in the right spot the compressor would kick in again. Then after
>>> that it just started working all by itself again. No such luck
>>> this time.
>>>
>>> I brought my own refrigerator to this apartment but they are going
>>> to have maintenance bring me a replacement. Sadly, the replacement
>>> refrigerator is tiny (14 cu. ft); not that mine was huge but you'd
>>> be surprised what a difference 4 cu. ft. makes.
>>>
>>> Meanwhile, all my frozen stuff is almost completely thawed out. I
>>> have it in a cooler with ice and will try to salvage as much of it
>>> as I can. What a pain in the a** this is! At least it answers the
>>> question about what to do with my leftover dressing... throw it
>>> away LOL
>>>
>>> OB Food: not sure I'll have any

>>

>
>
> Ugh. How much of the food can you cook then refreeze?
>
> gloria p
> whose fingers are all crossed that our 32 yr. old
> upright freezer in the garage will last forever.


Luckily for me a lot of the food was previously cooked frozen leftovers,
well packaged and I kept it cool after the OMG! incident. I think I managed
to salvage quite a bit, except for the suddenly defrosted seafood. (sigh)
I'm gonna have to cook that tonight or tomorrow. Oh well

Jill


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Sheldon
 
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Default Trying to Salvage Frozen Food


Nancy Young wrote:
> "jmcquown" > wrote
>
> > I brought my own refrigerator to this apartment but they are going to have
> > maintenance bring me a replacement. Sadly, the replacement refrigerator
> > is
> > tiny (14 cu. ft); not that mine was huge but you'd be surprised what a
> > difference 4 cu. ft. makes.

>
> Man, that's a huge difference.
>
> Do you know of a scratch and dent place? You can get a new
> refrigerator, full warranty/whatever, for a very reasonable
> amount of money.


Most every large appliance store sells floor models at major discount
too... this is probably a good time of year as the new models arrive
right after the holidays.



  #21 (permalink)   Report Post  
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jmcquown
 
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Default Trying to Salvage Frozen Food

Sheldon wrote:
> jmcquown wrote:
>> Wayne Boatwright wrote:
>>> On Thu 29 Dec 2005 11:58:29a, jmcquown wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>>>
>>>> Some time during the night my almost 20 year old refrigerator
>>>> decided to die. It stopped cooling 2-3 years ago but if I hit it
>>>> in the right spot the compressor would kick in again. Then after
>>>> that
>>>> it just started working all by itself again. No such luck this
>>>> time.
>>>>
>>>> I brought my own refrigerator to this apartment but they are going
>>>> to have maintenance bring me a replacement. Sadly, the replacement
>>>> refrigerator is tiny (14 cu. ft); not that mine was huge but you'd
>>>> be surprised what a difference 4 cu. ft. makes.
>>>>
>>>> Meanwhile, all my frozen stuff is almost completely thawed out. I
>>>> have it in a cooler with ice and will try to salvage as much of it
>>>> as I can. What a pain in the a** this is! At least it answers the
>>>> question about what to do with my leftover dressing... throw it
>>>> away LOL
>>>>
>>>> OB Food: not sure I'll have any
>>>
>>> How awful, Jill! Bet you wish you had bought that freezer a couple
>>> of years ago. :-(
>>>

>> You bet I do!
>>
>>> Is all of your frozen stuff thawed or can it be put into the
>>> freezer?

>>
>> Some of the stuff still had some ice crystals on it but the tilapia
>> and bay scallops will have to be dinner tonight (what a shame LOL).
>>
>>> If not completely thawed, you could buy some dry ice to put in the
>>> cooler instead of regular ice. That would preserve it until you get
>>> the new unit in place.

>>
>> Hmmm. Wonder where I'd have to go for that? I'll check for the
>> next time.

>
> Yellow Pages
>
> Everyone should have the location of the nearest ice house taped to
> their fridge, very useful for power outages.


There are no ice houses around here, dear. There are convenience stores and
grocery stores that sell bags of ice. Not even during my week-long power
outage in June 1999 did I have to think about dry ice. But that's because
the storm that made things very cool outside temperate and I had ready
access to just plain ice. I grilled everything I could possible salvage.
But the fact is, I didn't have nearly as much food in my freezer at that
time, either.

Luckily, most of my stuff was frozen already cooked leftovers (with a few
exceptions) so they were kept cool and can be used up, no problem. I got
off lightly. But I will prepare for the next event, should it happen any
time soon.

Jill


  #22 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
jmcquown
 
Posts: n/a
Default UPDATE and REQ: Trying to Salvage Frozen Food

Dan Abel wrote:
> In article >,
> "jmcquown" > wrote:
>
>
>> place on the door for eggs). Worst of all, the doors open in the
>> opposite direction from what I've been used to for nearly 20 years!
>> LOL That is going to take some getting used to.

>
>
> Nearly all fridges are designed so that the handles and hinges can be
> mounted on either side. I have no idea how hard that is or how long
> it takes.
>
> If you are going to have this fridge for long, it might be worth
> checking into. It's never mattered to me, but if you think about some
> possible kitchen layouts, it's essential to have the door open in a
> certain way.


You're right; in this case it doesn't matter. But I keep grabbing at the
left side of the door and realizing - heh - there isn't a handle there.
Then I laugh at myself and carry on

Jill


  #23 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
~patches~
 
Posts: n/a
Default UPDATE and REQ: Trying to Salvage Frozen Food

jmcquown wrote:

> Dan Abel wrote:
>
>>In article >,
>> "jmcquown" > wrote:
>>
>>
>>
>>>place on the door for eggs). Worst of all, the doors open in the
>>>opposite direction from what I've been used to for nearly 20 years!
>>>LOL That is going to take some getting used to.

>>
>>
>>Nearly all fridges are designed so that the handles and hinges can be
>>mounted on either side. I have no idea how hard that is or how long
>>it takes.
>>
>>If you are going to have this fridge for long, it might be worth
>>checking into. It's never mattered to me, but if you think about some
>>possible kitchen layouts, it's essential to have the door open in a
>>certain way.

>
>
> You're right; in this case it doesn't matter. But I keep grabbing at the
> left side of the door and realizing - heh - there isn't a handle there.
> Then I laugh at myself and carry on
>
> Jill
>
>


Sorry to hear of your recent fridge problems Jill. I'm glad everything
worked out ok for you. I hear you on the handle. Our old microwave had
a door release button under the control panel but our new one opens by
just pulling the door. I don't how many times I've pushed under the
control panel then realized I don't need to do that any more. My new
range has the push then turn knobs so I have to get used to those as
well. Change is good if by choice but sometimes disorienting.
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