General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Matt Shoop
 
Posts: n/a
Default Quiche Problems

I have tried to make a number of quiches in the last few months and have
yet you have one that came out really good. The first one was made with
eggs, ham, mushrooms and condensed milk (I know but that was the
recipe). It came out fine, but it was so sweet I felt like I was eating
desert. The second qiche was made with eggs, mushrooms, tomatos and 2%
milk, it tasted funny, but no matter how much we cooked it, it never
really set up.

Can anybody tell me what I am doing wrong, or point me to a recipe that
they have tried and had work well.

Thanks!
Matt Shoop
  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Peter Aitken
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Matt Shoop" > wrote in message
...
>I have tried to make a number of quiches in the last few months and have
>yet you have one that came out really good. The first one was made with
>eggs, ham, mushrooms and condensed milk (I know but that was the recipe).
>It came out fine, but it was so sweet I felt like I was eating desert. The
>second qiche was made with eggs, mushrooms, tomatos and 2% milk, it tasted
>funny, but no matter how much we cooked it, it never really set up.
>
> Can anybody tell me what I am doing wrong, or point me to a recipe that
> they have tried and had work well.
>
> Thanks!
> Matt Shoop


Quiche should be made wth cream. I suggest following the recipes in Julia
Child's first cookbook. They have very detailed instructions and are really
great.


--
Peter Aitken

Remove the crap from my email address before using.


  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Mike Pearce
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Matt Shoop" wrote in message ...

>I have tried to make a number of quiches in the last few months and
>have yet you have one that came out really good. The first one was
>made with eggs, ham, mushrooms and condensed milk (I know but that
>was the recipe). It came out fine, but it was so sweet I felt like I
>was eating desert.


Well, every can of condensed milk I've seen is sweetened. I would
expect a quiche using condensed milk to be sweet. I use condensed milk
when I make flan which isn't really all that much different from
quiche in many ways except it's sweet.


>The second qiche was made with eggs, mushrooms, tomatos and 2% milk,
>it tasted funny, but no matter how much we cooked it, it never really
>set up.


> Can anybody tell me what I am doing wrong, or point me to a recipe
> that they have tried and had work well.


A more detailed recipe especially as it relates to the number of eggs
and the quantity of milk would help. One thing I'll tell you is that I
use half and half when I make quiche.

I use four eggs and two cups of half and half for one quiche. So long
as you don't add anything too wet to the quiche it should set up fine.
I kind of wing it with the other ingredients but usually add some ham,
broccoli, onion and Swiss cheese. I'll bake the quiche at 425F for 15
minutes and then reduce the temp to 300F 30 minutes or so until a
knife comes out reasonably clean when inserted about half way between
the edge and the center of the quiche. I learned how to make quiche
from the Betty Crocker cookbook my mom gave me when I moved out of the
house many years ago.

Good luck,
-Mike



  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Marcella Peek
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article >,
Matt Shoop > wrote:

> I have tried to make a number of quiches in the last few months and have
> yet you have one that came out really good. The first one was made with
> eggs, ham, mushrooms and condensed milk (I know but that was the
> recipe). It came out fine, but it was so sweet I felt like I was eating
> desert. The second qiche was made with eggs, mushrooms, tomatos and 2%
> milk, it tasted funny, but no matter how much we cooked it, it never
> really set up.
>
> Can anybody tell me what I am doing wrong, or point me to a recipe that
> they have tried and had work well.
>
> Thanks!
> Matt Shoop


Well, I think the first thing wrong is that the recipe likely called for
evaporated milk not condensed milk. Two totally different things and
evaporated milk is not sweetened and is sometimes used as a cream
substitute.

Since there's not a recipe for the second time I can only guess that you
used the first recipe and since 2% is significantly more watery than
evaporated milk that was your problem.

Here's Julia Child's recipe from The French Chef cookbook

Quiche Au Fromage

1 C grated swiss cheese
1 8" unbaked pie shell
1 1/4 C milk
3 eggs
1/2 t salt
pinch of pepper and nutmeg
1-2 T butter

Spread 3/4 of cheese in pie shell. Beat together eggs, milk and
seasonings. Pour into pie shell. sprinkle with remaining cheese and
dot with butter. Bake at 375 for 25-30 minutes.

Honestly, I have changed the cheese to jack and/or added sauteed
mushrooms or asparagus or broccoli or crumbled bacon etc and it's always
been good.

good luck
marcella
  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
cathy
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Tue, 22 Mar 2005 16:09:13 -0800, Matt Shoop >
wrote:

>I have tried to make a number of quiches in the last few months and have
>yet you have one that came out really good. The first one was made with
>eggs, ham, mushrooms and condensed milk (I know but that was the
>recipe). It came out fine, but it was so sweet I felt like I was eating
>desert. The second qiche was made with eggs, mushrooms, tomatos and 2%
>milk, it tasted funny, but no matter how much we cooked it, it never
>really set up.
>
>Can anybody tell me what I am doing wrong, or point me to a recipe that
>they have tried and had work well.
>
>Thanks!
>Matt Shoop


Are you sure the recipe didn't cal for evaporated milk, not condensed
milk? It's easy to get them mixed up, they sell them side by side on
the shelf, they are both canned milk, but they are vastly different
products. I can see a quiche made with evaporated milk but not
condensed milk.

My favorite quiche recipe uses sour cream, eggs, a variety of cheeses,
onions and bacon. It's pretty foolproof.

Cathy


  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Amarantha
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Matt Shoop > wrote in news:d1qc3a$pim$1
@domitilla.aioe.org:

>
> Can anybody tell me what I am doing wrong, or point me to a recipe that
> they have tried and had work well.
>


we use:
home-made pastry, blind-baked
300ml cream
4 eggs
flavourings of your choice (i use seeded mustard, salt and pepper and
chopped fresh chilli, sometimes cheese)
contents of your choice (i use stuff like tinned sweetcorn, leftover bbq
chicken, ham, sun-dried tomatoes and so on
toppings of your choice (cheese, shredded ham, a few thin tomato slices)
Cook in moderate oven ~45min (or until golden brown and puffed up)
Notes: We like to spread chilli jam on the inside of the pastry crust
before filling it. Try not to go overboard with the chunky bits or the egg
mixture won't all fit. Different ingredients can cause different outcomes
where texture is concerned, but I've never had one I didn't like.

Good luck

K
--
nil illegitimi carborundum
  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
cathy
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Actually condensed milk and evaporated milk are very similar. The only
real difference is condensed milk is heavily sweetened and evaporated
milk isn't. Otherwise the process that evaporates/condenses the milk
is pretty much the same thing.

Some times evaporated milk is called condensed milk, which is correct,
because what we call condensed milk is properly called "sweetened
condensed milk".

I think the recipe the op quoted was either sloppy in it's terminology
or just plain wrong (misprint?). A quiche made with evaporated milk
should work just fine.

Cathy
  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Edwin Pawlowski
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Marcella Peek" > wrote in message
>
> Well, I think the first thing wrong is that the recipe likely called for
> evaporated milk not condensed milk.



Now why would you make a dumb statement like that.
Crab Quiche


Ingredients:



1 lb. Crabmeat

1 cup condensed milk (one 14 oz can = 1 cup)

1/2 cup onions chopped

2 cans cream of mushroom soup

8 eggs

8 oz. shredded cheddar cheese

8 oz. shredded mozzarella cheese

Dash of nutmeg

2 9" deep dish pie shells



Prick pie shells, set aside. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Beat eggs
slightly, add all other ingredients. Mix together and pour into pie shell.



Bake at 350 degrees for one hour (or until knife inserted in center comes
out clean).



Cool 20 minutes.



Serves 12. Can be frozen and reheated.



Sue Hertzler Dragon Run Inn

804-758-5719

www.dragon-run-inn.com


  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Edwin Pawlowski
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Matt Shoop" > wrote in message

> and 2% milk,


Bingo!


  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Edwin Pawlowski
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"cathy" > wrote in message
> . I can see a quiche made with evaporated milk but not
> condensed milk.



See the recipe I just posted. Hundreds of people have eaten and enjoyed it
as we did when we stayed at the Dragon Run Inn. It was Saturday breakfast.
We make it a couple of times a year.




  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
Gal Called J.J.
 
Posts: n/a
Default

One time on Usenet, Matt Shoop > said:
> I have tried to make a number of quiches in the last few months and have
> yet you have one that came out really good. The first one was made with
> eggs, ham, mushrooms and condensed milk (I know but that was the
> recipe).


Does the recipe call for condensed milk or evaporated milk? Condensed is
usually? always? sweetened.

> It came out fine, but it was so sweet I felt like I was eating
> desert. The second qiche was made with eggs, mushrooms, tomatos and 2%
> milk, it tasted funny,


What did it taste like that was "funny"?

> but no matter how much we cooked it, it never
> really set up.


2% might be too thin -- I use half & half or whipping cream.

> Can anybody tell me what I am doing wrong, or point me to a recipe that
> they have tried and had work well.


I do, I do! :

Bacon Quiche

Pastry for one 9-inch pie crust
10-12 slices bacon, cooked and crumbled
C. swiss cheese, shredded
C. cheddar cheese, shredded
C. onion, finely chopped
4 eggs
2 C. whipping cream
tsp. salt
tsp. black pepper
1/8 tsp. red (cayenne) pepper, ground

Heat oven to 425. Lay pastry in quiche pan. Sprinkle
with bacon, cheese, and onion. Beat eggs slightly, beat in
remaining ingredients. Pour into quiche pan, bake uncovered
for 15 minutes. Reduce oven to 300 F, bake about 30 minutes
longer, or until inserted knife comes out clean. Let stand
10 minutes before cutting.

Chicken Quiche: Replace bacon with one whole chicken
breast, cooked and cut into cubes. Replace red pepper
with tsp. dried thyme, crushed.

--
J.J. in WA ~ mom, vid gamer, novice cook ~
"You still haven't explained why the pool is
filled with elf blood." - Frylock, ATHF
  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
Sheldon
 
Posts: n/a
Default


cathy wrote:
> Actually condensed milk and evaporated milk are very similar. The

only
> real difference is condensed milk is heavily sweetened and evaporated
> milk isn't. Otherwise the process that evaporates/condenses the milk
> is pretty much the same thing.
>
> Some times evaporated milk is called condensed milk, which is

correct,
> because what we call condensed milk is properly called "sweetened
> condensed milk".
>
> I think the recipe the op quoted was either sloppy in it's

terminology
> or just plain wrong (misprint?). A quiche made with evaporated milk
> should work just fine.
>
> Cathy


Actually not. Evaporated milk and condensed milk are synonymous (no
"similar" about it), they are exactly precisely in every respect 100%
identical. Sweetened condensed milk is an entirely different product.
When a recipe calls for sweetened condensed milk evaporated milk or
condensed milk will not work, and vice versa.

Sheldon

  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Edwin Pawlowski wrote:
> "Marcella Peek" > wrote in message
> >
> > Well, I think the first thing wrong is that the recipe likely

called for
> > evaporated milk not condensed milk.

>
>
> Now why would you make a dumb statement like that.
> Crab Quiche
>
>
> Ingredients:
>
>
>
> 1 lb. Crabmeat
>
> 1 cup condensed milk (one 14 oz can = 1 cup)
>
> 1/2 cup onions chopped
>
> 2 cans cream of mushroom soup
>
> 8 eggs
>
> 8 oz. shredded cheddar cheese
>
> 8 oz. shredded mozzarella cheese
>
> Dash of nutmeg
>
> 2 9" deep dish pie shells
>
>
>
> Prick pie shells, set aside. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Beat eggs


> slightly, add all other ingredients. Mix together and pour into pie

shell.
>
>
>
> Bake at 350 degrees for one hour (or until knife inserted in center

comes
> out clean).
>
>
>
> Cool 20 minutes.
>


Yeah, but Ed, I've never seen "condensed" milk on the shelf at the
store - I can buy evaporated milk (what I use in quiche) OR SWEETENED
condensed milk, which is the only condensed milk on the shelf at my
store.

You evidently can buy "condensed" milk which is, I understand, the same
as evaporated milk. I cannot.

(Actually, I use skim evaporated milk in quiche.)

N.

  #14 (permalink)   Report Post  
notbob
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On 2005-03-23, Edwin Pawlowski > wrote:

> 1 lb. Crabmeat
>
> 1 cup condensed milk (one 14 oz can = 1 cup)


Fourteen ounces equals one cup!? No wonder they call it "condensed"
milk.

n
  #15 (permalink)   Report Post  
notbob
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On 2005-03-23, Matt Shoop > wrote:

> milk, it tasted funny, but no matter how much we cooked it, it never
> really set up.


Use 4 large eggs OR 3 extra large eggs to 8 ozs of heavy (whipping)
cream. Sweat veggies, mushrooms or asparagus for example, to drive
out most (not all) of the natural moisture.

nbo


  #16 (permalink)   Report Post  
cathy
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On 23 Mar 2005 05:23:56 -0800, "Sheldon" > wrote:

>
>cathy wrote:
>> Actually condensed milk and evaporated milk are very similar. The

>only
>> real difference is condensed milk is heavily sweetened and evaporated
>> milk isn't. Otherwise the process that evaporates/condenses the milk
>> is pretty much the same thing.
>>
>> Some times evaporated milk is called condensed milk, which is

>correct,
>> because what we call condensed milk is properly called "sweetened
>> condensed milk".
>>
>> I think the recipe the op quoted was either sloppy in it's

>terminology
>> or just plain wrong (misprint?). A quiche made with evaporated milk
>> should work just fine.
>>
>> Cathy

>
>Actually not. Evaporated milk and condensed milk are synonymous (no
>"similar" about it), they are exactly precisely in every respect 100%
>identical. Sweetened condensed milk is an entirely different product.
>When a recipe calls for sweetened condensed milk evaporated milk or
>condensed milk will not work, and vice versa.
>
>Sheldon


I'm sorry, I was as clear as mud. You're absolutely right, sweetened
condenesed milk and evaporated milk are NOT interchangeable. I meant
that evaporated milk could easily be substituted for whole milk or
half and half or even cream in a quiche recipe, but not sweetened
condensed milk.

I'm sure there are quiches that can and do use sweetened condenesed
milk successfully, but not the recipe the op was complaining about. I
feel that =that= recipe was either misprinted or sloppily written.

Cathy
  #17 (permalink)   Report Post  
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I would say that in the second case, the 2% milk is probably
the problem, but did you seed and drain the tomatoes? They
might have been juicy which wouldn't have helped. Also, are
you sure your oven is working properly?

On Tue, 22 Mar 2005, Matt Shoop wrote:

> I have tried to make a number of quiches in the last few months and have yet
> you have one that came out really good. The first one was made with eggs,
> ham, mushrooms and condensed milk (I know but that was the recipe). It came
> out fine, but it was so sweet I felt like I was eating desert. The second
> qiche was made with eggs, mushrooms, tomatos and 2% milk, it tasted funny,
> but no matter how much we cooked it, it never really set up.
>
> Can anybody tell me what I am doing wrong, or point me to a recipe that they
> have tried and had work well.
>
> Thanks!
> Matt Shoop
>


^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Katherine Becker "As god is my witness
I thought turkeys could fly"
NEVER SEND A FERRET TO DO A WEASEL's JOB --WKRP

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
  #18 (permalink)   Report Post  
Sheldon
 
Posts: n/a
Default


wrote:
> Edwin Pawlowski wrote:
> > "Marcella Peek" > wrote in message
> > >
> > > Well, I think the first thing wrong is that the recipe likely

> called for
> > > evaporated milk not condensed milk.

> >
> >
> > Now why would you make a dumb statement like that.
> > Crab Quiche
> >
> >
> > Ingredients:
> >
> >
> >
> > 1 lb. Crabmeat
> >
> > 1 cup condensed milk (one 14 oz can = 1 cup)
> >
> > 1/2 cup onions chopped
> >
> > 2 cans cream of mushroom soup
> >
> > 8 eggs
> >
> > 8 oz. shredded cheddar cheese
> >
> > 8 oz. shredded mozzarella cheese
> >
> > Dash of nutmeg
> >
> > 2 9" deep dish pie shells
> >
> >
> >
> > Prick pie shells, set aside. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Beat

eggs
>
> > slightly, add all other ingredients. Mix together and pour into

pie
> shell.
> >
> >
> >
> > Bake at 350 degrees for one hour (or until knife inserted in center

> comes
> > out clean).
> >
> >
> >
> > Cool 20 minutes.
> >

>
> Yeah, but Ed, I've never seen "condensed" milk on the shelf at the
> store - I can buy evaporated milk (what I use in quiche) OR SWEETENED
> condensed milk, which is the only condensed milk on the shelf at my
> store.
>
> You evidently can buy "condensed" milk which is, I understand, the

same
> as evaporated milk. I cannot.
>
> (Actually, I use skim evaporated milk in quiche.)
>
> N.


Depends where in the world one lives. Originally, before the name
changed to evaporated milk it was called condensed milk (change was do
to changes in the manufacturing process and from other manufacturers
joining the fray and mergers, but the resultant product is the same).
In many parts of the world and in many parts of the US (typically
Hispanic areas) it's still labeled condensed milk. If it's "Sweetened
Condensed Milk one wants then the product must be marked "Sweetened
Condensed Milk". Could just as easily be called "Sweetened Evaporated
Milk" but because mostly Hispanic populations use the SWEETENED version
and they are more familiar with the older/original "Condensed" format
it is called Sweetened Condensed Milk rather than Sweetened Evaporated
Milk. We've discussed this here many times over the years, and I've
often posted links to the history of these products, so I'm surprised
at how you of all people (you've been here forever) choose not to
remember... I say "choose" because I'd not want to be cited for
implying that you are suffering from senile dementia. hehe

Sheldon

  #19 (permalink)   Report Post  
Rick & Cyndi
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Matt Shoop" > wrote in message
...
>I have tried to make a number of quiches in the last few months and have
>yet you have one that came out really good. The first one was made with
>eggs, ham, mushrooms and condensed milk (I know but that was the recipe).
>It came out fine, but it was so sweet I felt like I was eating desert. The
>second qiche was made with eggs, mushrooms, tomatos and 2% milk, it tasted
>funny, but no matter how much we cooked it, it never really set up.
>
> Can anybody tell me what I am doing wrong, or point me to a recipe that
> they have tried and had work well.
>
> Thanks!
> Matt Shoop

=============

I think the recipe was supposed to say "evaporated" milk... "condensed" is
*sweetened*...

Cyndi


  #20 (permalink)   Report Post  
Jude
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Every quiche I've made has some type of cheese in it, which would seem
to act as a binder/thickener.

My mom's basic recipe:

pie shell
grated cheeese over the bottom
whatever veggies / meats/ seafood you want
3 eggs whisked with 1 c. whole milk.....sometimes I use my 2% but add a
shot of half-and-half to riichen it

Bake at 375 for 45 minutes.

Let it stand for 5 - 10 minutes befoer serving to set.



  #21 (permalink)   Report Post  
Serene
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Matt Shoop > wrote:

> I have tried to make a number of quiches in the last few months and have
> yet you have one that came out really good. The first one was made with
> eggs, ham, mushrooms and condensed milk (I know but that was the
> recipe). It came out fine, but it was so sweet I felt like I was eating
> desert.


Wow, I've seen evaporated milk in a quiche recipe, but not condensed.

The recipe I use as a basic starting point is here, but as often as not,
I grate the cheese and mix it in; otherwise, I find the layered textures
a little off. Also, I often use four eggs rather than three:

http://groups-beta.google.com/group/...msg/29fc41613b
b392e5?dmode=source

serene
--
http://serenejournal.livejournal.com
http://www.jhuger.com
Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
TAB quiche Paul M. Cook General Cooking 10 01-12-2013 10:30 PM
Quiche [email protected] General Cooking 110 10-09-2006 07:07 PM
quiche problems - again!! serene General Cooking 32 06-09-2006 10:49 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 10:32 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2024, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2024 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"