General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
zxcvbob
 
Posts: n/a
Default ? pressure cooking dried beans

Do you still have to soak them first? How many minutes to cook navy
beans at 15 pounds? Thanks.

Best regards,
Bob
  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article >,
zxcvbob > wrote:

> Do you still have to soak them first? How many minutes to cook navy
> beans at 15 pounds? Thanks.
>
> Best regards,
> Bob


I've done lentils and split peas in a pressure cooker without soaking
them.....

I put 2 cups of water per cup of lentils (or split peas) into the
pressure cooker with a chopped onion, some garlic powder, fresh ground
pepper and a ham bone, bring up to pressure then turn down and let
pressure for about 2 hours or so on low.

Works fine for me, and I'm sure it'd work with beans as well.

I know this is gonna get me flamed, but I usually just stick with canned
beans as I rarely ever eat them. Seems to eliminate the "gas" factor.

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...user id=katra
  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
zxcvbob
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Katra wrote:
> In article >,
> zxcvbob > wrote:
>
>
>>Do you still have to soak them first? How many minutes to cook navy
>>beans at 15 pounds? Thanks.
>>
>>Best regards,
>>Bob

>
>
> I've done lentils and split peas in a pressure cooker without soaking
> them.....
>
> I put 2 cups of water per cup of lentils (or split peas) into the
> pressure cooker with a chopped onion, some garlic powder, fresh ground
> pepper and a ham bone, bring up to pressure then turn down and let
> pressure for about 2 hours or so on low.
>
> Works fine for me, and I'm sure it'd work with beans as well.
>
> I know this is gonna get me flamed, but I usually just stick with canned
> beans as I rarely ever eat them. Seems to eliminate the "gas" factor.
>



Thanks. Lentils and split peas don't have to be soaked, so I'm not sure
that means anything for beans. I've soaked the beans for a couple of
hours and they are almost plumped. I think that's probably enough that
I can pressure cook them. I'm going to add bay leaf, black pepper,
summer savory, some celery leaves, and a couple of ham hocks. When the
beans are done I'll add some sauteed onions.

Gas is half the fun of eating beans.

Best regards, ;-)
Bob
  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article >,
zxcvbob > wrote:

> Katra wrote:
> > In article >,
> > zxcvbob > wrote:
> >
> >
> >>Do you still have to soak them first? How many minutes to cook navy
> >>beans at 15 pounds? Thanks.
> >>
> >>Best regards,
> >>Bob

> >
> >
> > I've done lentils and split peas in a pressure cooker without soaking
> > them.....
> >
> > I put 2 cups of water per cup of lentils (or split peas) into the
> > pressure cooker with a chopped onion, some garlic powder, fresh ground
> > pepper and a ham bone, bring up to pressure then turn down and let
> > pressure for about 2 hours or so on low.
> >
> > Works fine for me, and I'm sure it'd work with beans as well.
> >
> > I know this is gonna get me flamed, but I usually just stick with canned
> > beans as I rarely ever eat them. Seems to eliminate the "gas" factor.
> >

>
>
> Thanks. Lentils and split peas don't have to be soaked, so I'm not sure
> that means anything for beans. I've soaked the beans for a couple of
> hours and they are almost plumped. I think that's probably enough that
> I can pressure cook them. I'm going to add bay leaf, black pepper,
> summer savory, some celery leaves, and a couple of ham hocks. When the
> beans are done I'll add some sauteed onions.


Sounds yummy!

>
> Gas is half the fun of eating beans.


<giggles>

>
> Best regards, ;-)
> Bob


I love pressure cooking for a LOT of things.
It speeds things up and prevents things from drying out.

I always use it for rice as well (30 minutes once it comes up to
pressure, usually cook with meat stock) and it makes the most FABulous
yams you've ever had!

kat

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...user id=katra
  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
serene
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Sun, 27 Feb 2005 14:35:59 -0800, Katra wrote
(in article
>):

> I always use it for rice as well (30 minutes once it comes up to pressure,
> usually cook with meat stock)


But rice only takes me 20 minutes from the boil in the conventional
manner (45-50 minutes for brown rice). That doesn't seem like much
of a time savings.

serene



  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Melba's Jammin'
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article >,
Katra > wrote:

> I love pressure cooking for a LOT of things.
> It speeds things up and prevents things from drying out.
>
> I always use it for rice as well (30 minutes once it comes up to
> pressure, usually cook with meat stock) and it makes the most FABulous
> yams you've ever had!
>
> kat


Huh? How much rice and what kind? I cook one cup of raw white long
grain rice in two cups of water in the microwave in about 15 minutes.
--
-Barb, <www.jamlady.eboard.com> Sweet Potato Follies added 2/24/05.
"I read recipes the way I read science fiction: I get to the end and
say,'Well, that's not going to happen.'" - Comedian Rita Rudner,
performance at New York, New York, January 10, 2005.
  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
zxcvbob
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Katra wrote:
> In article >,
> zxcvbob > wrote:
>
>
>>Katra wrote:
>>
>>>In article >,
>>> zxcvbob > wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>>Do you still have to soak them first? How many minutes to cook navy
>>>>beans at 15 pounds? Thanks.
>>>>
>>>>Best regards,
>>>>Bob
>>>
>>>
>>>I've done lentils and split peas in a pressure cooker without soaking
>>>them.....
>>>
>>>I put 2 cups of water per cup of lentils (or split peas) into the
>>>pressure cooker with a chopped onion, some garlic powder, fresh ground
>>>pepper and a ham bone, bring up to pressure then turn down and let
>>>pressure for about 2 hours or so on low.
>>>
>>>Works fine for me, and I'm sure it'd work with beans as well.
>>>
>>>I know this is gonna get me flamed, but I usually just stick with canned
>>>beans as I rarely ever eat them. Seems to eliminate the "gas" factor.
>>>

>>
>>
>>Thanks. Lentils and split peas don't have to be soaked, so I'm not sure
>>that means anything for beans. I've soaked the beans for a couple of
>>hours and they are almost plumped. I think that's probably enough that
>>I can pressure cook them. I'm going to add bay leaf, black pepper,
>>summer savory, some celery leaves, and a couple of ham hocks. When the
>>beans are done I'll add some sauteed onions.

>
>
> Sounds yummy!
>
>
>>Gas is half the fun of eating beans.

>
>
> <giggles>
>
>>Best regards, ;-)
>>Bob

>
>
> I love pressure cooking for a LOT of things.
> It speeds things up and prevents things from drying out.
>
> I always use it for rice as well (30 minutes once it comes up to
> pressure, usually cook with meat stock) and it makes the most FABulous
> yams you've ever had!
>
> kat
>



Are you sure you're using a pressure cooker? I just cooked the
half-soaked beans for 10 minutes in some salty ham broth (and then let
the cooker cool slowly without releasing the pressure) and they are
cooked nice and soft. Any longer and they would be mushy. If you
pressure cook rice for 30 minutes, even brown rice would turn into paste.

Best regards,
Bob
  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Dwayne
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Bob, I have just canned about 3 cookers full of pinto beans, and just about
have it down to an art.

First I soak the dried beans for 24 to 36 hours. Where I have had problems
is in not allowing enough head space. Even though they soak that long, they
will still expand and not let the jars seal.

Finally I learned that if I fill the jar to within 2 inches of the top with
beans and then add water to within 1/2 to1 inch from the top, they will come
out OK. Otherwise the top 1 to 2 inches of beans are not covered in juice.

If I do it that way, the beans expand and still have enough juice. It makes
them a lot better eating also. I have also canned them with ham, ham hocks,
pork, onions, and garlic. So far they have all tasted OK (except for one
quart that I forgot to add the teaspoon of salt).

Everyone likes mine better because I can control the amount of salt that
goes in it. Some that I have bought were really salty.

Dwayne


"zxcvbob" > wrote in message
...
> Do you still have to soak them first? How many minutes to cook navy beans
> at 15 pounds? Thanks.
>
> Best regards,
> Bob




  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
zxcvbob
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Dwayne wrote:
> Bob, I have just canned about 3 cookers full of pinto beans, and just about
> have it down to an art.
>
> First I soak the dried beans for 24 to 36 hours. Where I have had problems
> is in not allowing enough head space. Even though they soak that long, they
> will still expand and not let the jars seal.
>
> Finally I learned that if I fill the jar to within 2 inches of the top with
> beans and then add water to within 1/2 to1 inch from the top, they will come
> out OK. Otherwise the top 1 to 2 inches of beans are not covered in juice.
>
> If I do it that way, the beans expand and still have enough juice. It makes
> them a lot better eating also. I have also canned them with ham, ham hocks,
> pork, onions, and garlic. So far they have all tasted OK (except for one
> quart that I forgot to add the teaspoon of salt).
>
> Everyone likes mine better because I can control the amount of salt that
> goes in it. Some that I have bought were really salty.
>
> Dwayne
>


Thanks. I wasn't canning them this time, just cooking a mess o' beans.
(They turned out pretty good.)

I had the same problem when I canned beans. So I figured next time I
would parboil the soaked beans before I filled the jars.

Best regards,
Bob
  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
CaptCook
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"zxcvbob" wrote ...
> Do you still have to soak them first? How many minutes to cook navy
> beans at 15 pounds? Thanks.


I regularly do pinto beans at 15 pounds for 10 minutes. No presoak.




  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article et>,
serene > wrote:

> On Sun, 27 Feb 2005 14:35:59 -0800, Katra wrote
> (in article
> >):
>
> > I always use it for rice as well (30 minutes once it comes up to pressure,
> > usually cook with meat stock)

>
> But rice only takes me 20 minutes from the boil in the conventional
> manner (45-50 minutes for brown rice). That doesn't seem like much
> of a time savings.
>
> serene
>


Maybe not for you, but pressuring seems to be the only way I can ever
get it right! :-P I've tried just steaming rice in a covered pot on the
stove and it always comes out hard and crunchy. I've not figured out
what I'm doing wrong! It just won't absorb the darned liquid, but
pressuring makes perfect rice for me every time! :-)

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...user id=katra
  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article >,
Melba's Jammin' > wrote:

> In article >,
> Katra > wrote:
>
> > I love pressure cooking for a LOT of things.
> > It speeds things up and prevents things from drying out.
> >
> > I always use it for rice as well (30 minutes once it comes up to
> > pressure, usually cook with meat stock) and it makes the most FABulous
> > yams you've ever had!
> >
> > kat

>
> Huh? How much rice and what kind? I cook one cup of raw white long
> grain rice in two cups of water in the microwave in about 15 minutes.


I like to mix brown rice and black wild rice. :-)

I've microwaved white rice as well and that works, but I inevitably make
a mess in the microwave with the starchy liquid coming out, boiling over
and making a nasty, sticky puddle on the bottom of the m-wave...

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...user id=katra
  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article >,
zxcvbob > wrote:

> Katra wrote:
> > In article >,
> > zxcvbob > wrote:
> >
> >
> >>Katra wrote:
> >>
> >>>In article >,
> >>> zxcvbob > wrote:
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>>Do you still have to soak them first? How many minutes to cook navy
> >>>>beans at 15 pounds? Thanks.
> >>>>
> >>>>Best regards,
> >>>>Bob
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>I've done lentils and split peas in a pressure cooker without soaking
> >>>them.....
> >>>
> >>>I put 2 cups of water per cup of lentils (or split peas) into the
> >>>pressure cooker with a chopped onion, some garlic powder, fresh ground
> >>>pepper and a ham bone, bring up to pressure then turn down and let
> >>>pressure for about 2 hours or so on low.
> >>>
> >>>Works fine for me, and I'm sure it'd work with beans as well.
> >>>
> >>>I know this is gonna get me flamed, but I usually just stick with canned
> >>>beans as I rarely ever eat them. Seems to eliminate the "gas" factor.
> >>>
> >>
> >>
> >>Thanks. Lentils and split peas don't have to be soaked, so I'm not sure
> >>that means anything for beans. I've soaked the beans for a couple of
> >>hours and they are almost plumped. I think that's probably enough that
> >>I can pressure cook them. I'm going to add bay leaf, black pepper,
> >>summer savory, some celery leaves, and a couple of ham hocks. When the
> >>beans are done I'll add some sauteed onions.

> >
> >
> > Sounds yummy!
> >
> >
> >>Gas is half the fun of eating beans.

> >
> >
> > <giggles>
> >
> >>Best regards, ;-)
> >>Bob

> >
> >
> > I love pressure cooking for a LOT of things.
> > It speeds things up and prevents things from drying out.
> >
> > I always use it for rice as well (30 minutes once it comes up to
> > pressure, usually cook with meat stock) and it makes the most FABulous
> > yams you've ever had!
> >
> > kat
> >

>
>
> Are you sure you're using a pressure cooker? I just cooked the
> half-soaked beans for 10 minutes in some salty ham broth (and then let
> the cooker cool slowly without releasing the pressure) and they are
> cooked nice and soft. Any longer and they would be mushy. If you
> pressure cook rice for 30 minutes, even brown rice would turn into paste.
>
> Best regards,
> Bob


I turn the stove all the way down to low and slow cook after the weight
starts to rock.

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...user id=katra
  #14 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article >,
zxcvbob > wrote:

> Dwayne wrote:
> > Bob, I have just canned about 3 cookers full of pinto beans, and just about
> > have it down to an art.
> >
> > First I soak the dried beans for 24 to 36 hours. Where I have had problems
> > is in not allowing enough head space. Even though they soak that long,
> > they
> > will still expand and not let the jars seal.
> >
> > Finally I learned that if I fill the jar to within 2 inches of the top with
> > beans and then add water to within 1/2 to1 inch from the top, they will
> > come
> > out OK. Otherwise the top 1 to 2 inches of beans are not covered in juice.
> >
> > If I do it that way, the beans expand and still have enough juice. It
> > makes
> > them a lot better eating also. I have also canned them with ham, ham
> > hocks,
> > pork, onions, and garlic. So far they have all tasted OK (except for one
> > quart that I forgot to add the teaspoon of salt).
> >
> > Everyone likes mine better because I can control the amount of salt that
> > goes in it. Some that I have bought were really salty.
> >
> > Dwayne
> >

>
> Thanks. I wasn't canning them this time, just cooking a mess o' beans.
> (They turned out pretty good.)
>
> I had the same problem when I canned beans. So I figured next time I
> would parboil the soaked beans before I filled the jars.
>
> Best regards,
> Bob


How long did you let them cook? :-)
--
K.
  #15 (permalink)   Report Post  
zxcvbob
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Katra wrote:
> In article et>,
> serene > wrote:
>
>
>>On Sun, 27 Feb 2005 14:35:59 -0800, Katra wrote
>>(in article
>):
>>
>>
>>>I always use it for rice as well (30 minutes once it comes up to pressure,
>>>usually cook with meat stock)

>>
>>But rice only takes me 20 minutes from the boil in the conventional
>>manner (45-50 minutes for brown rice). That doesn't seem like much
>>of a time savings.
>>
>>serene
>>

>
>
> Maybe not for you, but pressuring seems to be the only way I can ever
> get it right! :-P I've tried just steaming rice in a covered pot on the
> stove and it always comes out hard and crunchy. I've not figured out
> what I'm doing wrong! It just won't absorb the darned liquid, but
> pressuring makes perfect rice for me every time! :-)
>



You don't perhaps live in Leadville, Colorado (10200' elevation) do you?

Best regards,
Bob


  #16 (permalink)   Report Post  
zxcvbob
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Katra wrote:

> In article >,
> zxcvbob > wrote:
>
>
>>Dwayne wrote:
>>
>>>Bob, I have just canned about 3 cookers full of pinto beans, and just about
>>>have it down to an art.
>>>
>>>First I soak the dried beans for 24 to 36 hours. Where I have had problems
>>>is in not allowing enough head space. Even though they soak that long,
>>>they
>>>will still expand and not let the jars seal.
>>>
>>>Finally I learned that if I fill the jar to within 2 inches of the top with
>>>beans and then add water to within 1/2 to1 inch from the top, they will
>>>come
>>>out OK. Otherwise the top 1 to 2 inches of beans are not covered in juice.
>>>
>>>If I do it that way, the beans expand and still have enough juice. It
>>>makes
>>>them a lot better eating also. I have also canned them with ham, ham
>>>hocks,
>>>pork, onions, and garlic. So far they have all tasted OK (except for one
>>>quart that I forgot to add the teaspoon of salt).
>>>
>>>Everyone likes mine better because I can control the amount of salt that
>>>goes in it. Some that I have bought were really salty.
>>>
>>>Dwayne
>>>

>>
>>Thanks. I wasn't canning them this time, just cooking a mess o' beans.
>> (They turned out pretty good.)
>>
>>I had the same problem when I canned beans. So I figured next time I
>>would parboil the soaked beans before I filled the jars.
>>
>>Best regards,
>>Bob

>
>
> How long did you let them cook? :-)


I cooked the beans for 10 minutes at 15 pounds.

When I *canned* some beans last year, I processed at 10 pounds for
something like 75 minutes.

Bob
  #17 (permalink)   Report Post  
Sheldon
 
Posts: n/a
Default


zxcvbob wrote:
> Do you still have to soak them first? How many minutes to cook navy
> beans at 15 pounds?


Preparing food with a pressure cooker is NOT "cooking"... it's
*processing*. "Pressure cooker" is a misnomer, should be *pressure
processor*... more at Crap Shoot.

  #18 (permalink)   Report Post  
zxcvbob
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Sheldon wrote:
> zxcvbob wrote:
>
>>Do you still have to soak them first? How many minutes to cook navy
>>beans at 15 pounds?

>
>
> Preparing food with a pressure cooker is NOT "cooking"... it's
> *processing*. "Pressure cooker" is a misnomer, should be *pressure
> processor*... more at Crap Shoot.
>



Let's see... The beans were raw when they went in, and cooked when they
came out. Cooking is a process, so I don't know why you think this
distiction is important.

I believe you are getting confused by the difference between a pressure
cooker and a pressure canner. Pressure canners are a subset of usually
large pressure cookers that are designed to hold jars (or cans) of food
on a rack and have precise pressure controls. In fact, I was using my
smallest canner last night, but I was cooking in it, not canning
(processing). I think my bigger canner came with directions for using
it as an autoclave to sterilize bandages etc.

Best regards,
Bob
  #19 (permalink)   Report Post  
aem
 
Posts: n/a
Default

zxcvbob wrote:
> [snip]
> Let's see... The beans were raw when they went in, and cooked when
> they came out. Cooking is a process, so I don't know why you think
> this distiction is important.


We've never had a pressure cooker, and I've never understood why they
are used for cooking, since they seem to require extra care to avoid
kitchen disasters. I'm curious to knw if there is any advantage to
them other than saving time?

-aem

  #20 (permalink)   Report Post  
Melba's Jammin'
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article >,
Katra > wrote:

> I've microwaved white rice as well and that works, but I inevitably make
> a mess in the microwave with the starchy liquid coming out, boiling over
> and making a nasty, sticky puddle on the bottom of the m-wave...


Cooking vessel needs to be large enough to handle it - I know what
you're talking about. I do mine in a 2-quart Pyrex mixing pitcher and
add about 1/2 tsp oil to it, too.
--
-Barb, <www.jamlady.eboard.com> Sweet Potato Follies added 2/24/05.
"I read recipes the way I read science fiction: I get to the end and
say,'Well, that's not going to happen.'" - Comedian Rita Rudner,
performance at New York, New York, January 10, 2005.


  #21 (permalink)   Report Post  
notbob
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On 2005-02-28, zxcvbob > wrote:

> I believe you are getting confused by the difference between a pressure
> cooker and a pressure canner. Pressure canners are a subset of usually
> large pressure cookers that are designed to hold jars (or cans) of food
> on a rack and have precise pressure controls.


While I agree, I think you are also confusing the issue. Pressure
canners do the exact same thing as pressure cookers. They both apply
heat to food, which is one of the definitions of cook.

nb
  #22 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article >,
zxcvbob > wrote:

> Katra wrote:
> > In article et>,
> > serene > wrote:
> >
> >
> >>On Sun, 27 Feb 2005 14:35:59 -0800, Katra wrote
> >>(in article
> >):
> >>
> >>
> >>>I always use it for rice as well (30 minutes once it comes up to pressure,
> >>>usually cook with meat stock)
> >>
> >>But rice only takes me 20 minutes from the boil in the conventional
> >>manner (45-50 minutes for brown rice). That doesn't seem like much
> >>of a time savings.
> >>
> >>serene
> >>

> >
> >
> > Maybe not for you, but pressuring seems to be the only way I can ever
> > get it right! :-P I've tried just steaming rice in a covered pot on the
> > stove and it always comes out hard and crunchy. I've not figured out
> > what I'm doing wrong! It just won't absorb the darned liquid, but
> > pressuring makes perfect rice for me every time! :-)
> >

>
>
> You don't perhaps live in Leadville, Colorado (10200' elevation) do you?
>
> Best regards,
> Bob


<lol> No, and I'm well aware of the association between high altitude
and boiling water... ;-) We used to live at 8,000 ft. above Denver
Colorado. A pressure cooker is an indespensable tool when you live at
those hights!

I live in Central Texas which is plenty low enough to boil water
properly.

Honestly, I have no idea why I've never had good luck cooking rice the
standard way on the stovetop! :-(

Pressure cooker or microwave works fine tho'. I just really like the
texture of pressured rice!

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...user id=katra
  #23 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article .com>,
"aem" > wrote:

> zxcvbob wrote:
> > [snip]
> > Let's see... The beans were raw when they went in, and cooked when
> > they came out. Cooking is a process, so I don't know why you think
> > this distiction is important.

>
> We've never had a pressure cooker, and I've never understood why they
> are used for cooking, since they seem to require extra care to avoid
> kitchen disasters. I'm curious to knw if there is any advantage to
> them other than saving time?
>
> -aem
>


Pressure cookers are not as risky as one would think as long as you use
them right! Mom taught me to use one and she used it more than I ever
have.

The ONLY accident she ever had was once when she was cooking Lengua in
there. She had put in two of them and one curled up against the lid and
covered up the center pressure outlet blocking it!

Pressure cookers do have an additional little rubber pressure indicator
in the lid. That little rubber plug blew out and the sudden release of
pressure sprayed Lengua juice everywhere. ;-)

She was careful to never overload a pressure cooker again!

I've been using one now since I first started learning to cook from her
at 4 years of age and I'm 42 now and have never, ever had an accident or
problem! They are not as difficult to use as one might think and they,
at least in my opinion, seem to lock in flavor and texture for certain
foods and yes, save a LOT of time for some foods!

They are fantastic for making chicken or beef bone stock, and if cooked
long enough, the bones go very soft and can be crushed ane ether
composted or fed to the chickens.

They are a neat tool. :-)

Sorry about the overcooking I recommended for beans! Like I said, beans
are one thing I've never cooked in a pressure cooker! I've cooked splits
and lentils and liked to long, slow cook those to get the ham bone
flavor to really work itself into the mix.

Once the cooker comes up to pressure, rather than letting it continue on
high or medium, I turn it all the way down to low and just let it go. It
sort of acts as a slow cooker that way, but still cooks in a fraction of
the time it would have taken to use a crock pot.

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...user id=katra
  #24 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article >,
Melba's Jammin' > wrote:

> In article >,
> Katra > wrote:
>
> > I've microwaved white rice as well and that works, but I inevitably make
> > a mess in the microwave with the starchy liquid coming out, boiling over
> > and making a nasty, sticky puddle on the bottom of the m-wave...

>
> Cooking vessel needs to be large enough to handle it - I know what
> you're talking about. I do mine in a 2-quart Pyrex mixing pitcher and
> add about 1/2 tsp oil to it, too.


Cool. :-)
Does the oil keep the rice from being sticky?
I've honestly never tried adding oil to uncooked rice!

I've added chopped onion and grated carrot tho'......

I have large, flat, covered corningware baking dishes that I use.

Guess they are too shallow. <G>

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...user id=katra
  #25 (permalink)   Report Post  
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I love my pressure cooker.

Like many specialized kitchen appliances,
it does a few things very very well.
fork-tender pot-roasts with great gravy,
beans, some stews..

Replace the "rocker" with a heat resistant tube,
and you can even distill your own booze... ( I've been told )

I don't understand the tales of kitchen disasters.
There are safety pressure releases,
and, once up to pressure. it'd take a gorilla to open the lid.

Periodically, KMART has one on sale for $19.95.
Invest a twenty if you want to experiment.



On 28 Feb 2005 08:47:42 -0800, "aem" > wrote:

>zxcvbob wrote:
>> [snip]
>> Let's see... The beans were raw when they went in, and cooked when
>> they came out. Cooking is a process, so I don't know why you think
>> this distiction is important.

>
>We've never had a pressure cooker, and I've never understood why they
>are used for cooking, since they seem to require extra care to avoid
>kitchen disasters. I'm curious to knw if there is any advantage to
>them other than saving time?
>
>-aem


<rj>


  #26 (permalink)   Report Post  
Sheldon
 
Posts: n/a
Default


aem wrote:
> zxcvbob wrote:
> > [snip]
> > Let's see... The beans were raw when they went in, and cooked when
> > they came out. Cooking is a process, so I don't know why you think
> > this distiction is important.

>
> We've never had a pressure cooker, and I've never understood why they
> are used for cooking, since they seem to require extra care to avoid
> kitchen disasters. I'm curious to knw if there is any advantage to
> them other than saving time?
>
> -aem


As previously mentioned, pressure cooking is a "crap shoot"... put
everything in a pot, seal it and hope for the best... without ever
even once lifting the lid to make any adjustments or to check if
whether it's done cooking or not before undoing the contraption. So if
one is lucky enough to have low culinary expectations then I suppose
the time saved is important. But I honestly see no time saved
regardless, especially not where cooking beans is concerned... I mean
like who stands around for hours *constantly* staring at a pot of beans
cooking. And if someone were truely/honestly in a hurry they'd buy
canned... anyone says pressure cookers save time is a
LIAR/IDIOT-Both... yoose choose.

  #27 (permalink)   Report Post  
Sheldon
 
Posts: n/a
Default


notbob wrote:
> On 2005-02-28, zxcvbob > wrote:
>
> > I believe you are getting confused by the difference between a

pressure
> > cooker and a pressure canner. Pressure canners are a subset of

usually
> > large pressure cookers that are designed to hold jars (or cans) of

food
> > on a rack and have precise pressure controls.

>
> While I agree, I think you are also confusing the issue. Pressure
> canners do the exact same thing as pressure cookers. They both apply
> heat to food, which is one of the definitions of cook.
>
> nb


Musta applied heat to your brain too, for certain it's cooked.
Pressure canning is a process, NOT cooking... cooking took place
*prior* to the pressure process (which is a preserving process).

  #28 (permalink)   Report Post  
Gregory Morrow
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Sheldon wrote:

> As previously mentioned, pressure cooking is a "crap shoot"... put
> everything in a pot, seal it and hope for the best... without ever
> even once lifting the lid to make any adjustments or to check if
> whether it's done cooking or not before undoing the contraption. So if
> one is lucky enough to have low culinary expectations then I suppose
> the time saved is important. But I honestly see no time saved
> regardless, especially not where cooking beans is concerned... I mean
> like who stands around for hours *constantly* staring at a pot of beans
> cooking.



I've been cooking beans for years now and have never had to cook them for
over an hour or two (at most)...I don't even bother to soak them
"overnight", the method I generally use is to put the beans in the pot,
bring the water to a roiling boil, turn the heat off, let 'em sit for an
hour or so until they plump up, and then put the pot on "simmer"...perfect
every time. Garbanzos (when I choose to cook them, canned is often cheaper)
and lentils take even less time, practically speaking practically no time at
all...lentils in most cases practically take no longer to cook than white
rice...

Some of these folx soaking beans for *days* and then cooking them by
pressure or on the stove top for hours and hours on end must be using some
pretty OLD beenz - like from the Triassic Era or some such...they should add
some trilobite fossils to their beans so as to have a "Bean and Seafood
Delite" I guess ;-)

--
Best
Greg


  #29 (permalink)   Report Post  
Sheldon
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Gregory Morrow wrote:
> Sheldon wrote:
>
> > As previously mentioned, pressure cooking is a "crap shoot"... put
> > everything in a pot, seal it and hope for the best... without ever
> > even once lifting the lid to make any adjustments or to check if
> > whether it's done cooking or not before undoing the contraption.

So if
> > one is lucky enough to have low culinary expectations then I

suppose
> > the time saved is important. But I honestly see no time saved
> > regardless, especially not where cooking beans is concerned... I

mean
> > like who stands around for hours *constantly* staring at a pot of

beans
> > cooking.

>
>
> I've been cooking beans for years now and have never had to cook them

for
> over an hour or two (at most)...I don't even bother to soak them
> "overnight", the method I generally use is to put the beans in the

pot,
> bring the water to a roiling boil, turn the heat off, let 'em sit for

an
> hour or so until they plump up, and then put the pot on

"simmer"...perfect
> every time. Garbanzos (when I choose to cook them, canned is often

cheaper)
> and lentils take even less time, practically speaking practically no

time at
> all...lentils in most cases practically take no longer to cook than

white
> rice...
>
> Some of these folx soaking beans for *days* and then cooking them by
> pressure or on the stove top for hours and hours on end must be using

some
> pretty OLD beenz - like from the Triassic Era or some such...they

should add
> some trilobite fossils to their beans so as to have a "Bean and

Seafood
> Delite" I guess ;-)
>
> --
> Best
> Greg


If I had a penny for every bean I've cooked I'd be richer than the Shah
of Iran... not a day passed for a number of years I didn't cook beans
to feed 300-400 hungry sailers (often two types of beans in one day)...
never had any of the problems mentioned here and never used any
fercocktah pressure cooker.

  #30 (permalink)   Report Post  
notbob
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On 2005-02-28, Sheldon > wrote:

> Musta applied heat to your brain too, for certain it's cooked.
> Pressure canning is a process, NOT cooking... cooking took place
> *prior* to the pressure process (which is a preserving process).


More disinformation from the Village Idiot(tm).


  #31 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article >,
notbob > wrote:

> On 2005-02-28, Sheldon > wrote:
>
> > Musta applied heat to your brain too, for certain it's cooked.
> > Pressure canning is a process, NOT cooking... cooking took place
> > *prior* to the pressure process (which is a preserving process).

>
> More disinformation from the Village Idiot(tm).


Yep... ;-)

Pressure cooking food is never a crap shoot!
If you know what you are doing with any recipe and add all the right
ingredients and flavorings/spices in the first place, there is no need
to keep lifting the lid and "adjusting" it!

Sheesh!

Shel' honey, just 'cause your mom did not teach you how to use one does
not mean that it's not a very cool cooking tool!.

There is more to than pressure! You are applying heat as well which
means you are "cooking" it.

And it does more than just save time!

Try yams or potatoes in a pressure cooker sometime!
And it makes the most wonderful pot roasts.......

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...user id=katra
  #32 (permalink)   Report Post  
Sheldon
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Pressure cooking food is never a crap shoot!
If you know what you are doing with any recipe and add all the right
ingredients and flavorings/spices in the first place, there is no need
to keep lifting the lid and "adjusting" it!

Sheesh!

Shel' honey, just 'cause your mom did not teach you how to use one does

not mean that it's not a very cool cooking tool!.

There is more to than pressure! You are applying heat as well which
means you are "cooking" it.

And it does more than just save time!

Try yams or potatoes in a pressure cooker sometime!
And it makes the most wonderful pot roasts.......
K.

Yeah, right... everything cooks in the same time, eh... I can see a
slow cooker where everything is cooked *gently*, but tossing everything
in a pot all at once and lettin' it RIPPPPP is NOT cooking.... that's
culinary homicide!

I'm very, very glad my mom didn't teach me how to murder food.

  #33 (permalink)   Report Post  
aem
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Katra wrote:
[snip]
> If you know what you are doing with any recipe and add all the right
> ingredients and flavorings/spices in the first place, there is no

need
> to keep lifting the lid and "adjusting" it! [more snips]


Well, I might not have said "crap shoot" but he's raising pretty much
the same question I've always had with regard to a lot of
slow-cooker/crockpot recipes I've seen, which is that they want you to
put all the ingredients in at once and then go away till it's done.
But when I make stew, for example, there's browning, and there's
caramelization, and some of the vegetables go in early and some go in
late and some later yet--you get the idea. If the pressure cooker
similarly makes you cook everything for the same length of time, then
the number of things that will come out well seems pretty limited.

That said, the responses have given me more to think about than I knew
before, thanks.

-aem

  #34 (permalink)   Report Post  
zxcvbob
 
Posts: n/a
Default

aem wrote:
> Katra wrote:
> [snip]
>
>>If you know what you are doing with any recipe and add all the right
>>ingredients and flavorings/spices in the first place, there is no

>
> need
>
>>to keep lifting the lid and "adjusting" it! [more snips]

>
>
> Well, I might not have said "crap shoot" but he's raising pretty much
> the same question I've always had with regard to a lot of
> slow-cooker/crockpot recipes I've seen, which is that they want you to
> put all the ingredients in at once and then go away till it's done.
> But when I make stew, for example, there's browning, and there's
> caramelization, and some of the vegetables go in early and some go in
> late and some later yet--you get the idea. If the pressure cooker
> similarly makes you cook everything for the same length of time, then
> the number of things that will come out well seems pretty limited.
>
> That said, the responses have given me more to think about than I knew
> before, thanks.
>
> -aem
>


He just doesn't know what he's talking about but felt compelled to shoot
his mouth off anyway. (at least he's been fairly civil lately)

Yesterday, I pressure cooked the ham hocks by themselves for about 45
minutes to maybe an hour -- I wanted them to pretty much dissolve into a
mass of gelatin. I picked the little bit of meat out of them and added
it back to the broth, added the partially soaked beans, 2 bay leaves, a
few grinds of black pepper, a pinch of summer savory, and some crumpled
dried hot peppers. I pressure cooked it for 10 minutes and let the
pressure drop slowly without quenching it. Meanwhile, I chopped up the
fat and skin and bones from the hocks and boiled them in a little fresh
water to extract the rest of the flavor. When I opened the cooker, I
strained the ham-water into the beans and stirred it up and tasted it
for seasoning. (it was pretty good and didn't *really* need anything)

I sauteed a half an onion and a little bit of celery in some vegetable
oil. Added it to the beans, along with a little garlic powder and a
little more black pepper. Simmered, uncovered, for just a few minutes
and it was done.

What part of this would you consider to be a crap shoot? The same thing
could have been done without a pressure cooker, but it would have taken
all day and not have turned out any better.

I ate a big bowl of 'em last night, with some french bread and some
bread 'n' butter pickles. Today I took some to work for lunch with some
leftover rice and some hot sauce.

Best regards,
Bob
  #35 (permalink)   Report Post  
aem
 
Posts: n/a
Default


zxcvbob wrote:
[snip]
> Yesterday, I pressure cooked the ham hocks by themselves for about 45


> minutes to maybe an hour -- I wanted them to pretty much dissolve

into a
> mass of gelatin. I picked the little bit of meat out of them and

added
> it back to the broth, added the partially soaked beans, 2 bay leaves,

a
> few grinds of black pepper, a pinch of summer savory, and some

crumpled
> dried hot peppers. I pressure cooked it for 10 minutes and let the
> pressure drop slowly without quenching it. Meanwhile, I chopped up

the
> fat and skin and bones from the hocks and boiled them in a little

fresh
> water to extract the rest of the flavor. When I opened the cooker, I


> strained the ham-water into the beans and stirred it up and tasted it


> for seasoning. (it was pretty good and didn't *really* need

anything)

> I sauteed a half an onion and a little bit of celery in some

vegetable
> oil. Added it to the beans, along with a little garlic powder and a
> little more black pepper. Simmered, uncovered, for just a few

minutes
> and it was done. [snip the rest]


Can't argue when a workman knows his tools. I didn't realize that
people used the cookers that flexibly. Thanks. Now, can you really
find a decent one for $20. I looked up some product 'reviews' and they
seemed to be in the $150 range.

-aem

p.s. the beans sounded great right up until you added celery....



  #36 (permalink)   Report Post  
Sheldon
 
Posts: n/a
Default


aem wrote:
> Katra wrote:
> [snip]
> > If you know what you are doing with any recipe and add all the

right
> > ingredients and flavorings/spices in the first place, there is no

> need
> > to keep lifting the lid and "adjusting" it! [more snips]

>
> Well, I might not have said "crap shoot" but he's raising pretty much
> the same question I've always had with regard to a lot of
> slow-cooker/crockpot recipes I've seen, which is that they want you

to
> put all the ingredients in at once and then go away till it's done.
> But when I make stew, for example, there's browning, and there's
> caramelization, and some of the vegetables go in early and some go in
> late and some later yet--you get the idea. If the pressure cooker
> similarly makes you cook everything for the same length of time, then
> the number of things that will come out well seems pretty limited.
>
> That said, the responses have given me more to think about than I

knew
> before, thanks.
>
> -aem


How can one know when it's done... whether pot roast or spuds,
whatever, they all don't cook in the same time, and you can't fork em
if you can't remove the lid. I've never yet met two pot roasts that
cook in the same time. Even potatoes, one batch will be perfectly
cooked in 20 minutes, another batch may need 25 minutes... and why
would anyone use a pressure cooker for potatoes... you may save all of
4 minutes and end up with a pot full of mush. If I can't know the
level of doneness until after the gizmo is shut down then it's
definitely a crap shoot[period]

Of course if what you call food is what I call hog slop then that
explains it.

Sheldon

  #37 (permalink)   Report Post  
Damsel in dis Dress
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"aem" >, if that's their real name, wrote:

>Can't argue when a workman knows his tools. I didn't realize that
>people used the cookers that flexibly. Thanks. Now, can you really
>find a decent one for $20. I looked up some product 'reviews' and they
>seemed to be in the $150 range.


My pressure cooker/canner is still in its original box (I'm terrified to
use it). But we paid around $20 on clearance, at the end of canning
season. Not sure if they'd be carried in most stores this time of year.

Carol
--
"Years ago my mother used to say to me... She'd say,
'In this world Elwood, you must be oh-so smart or oh-so pleasant.'
Well, for years I was smart.... I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."

*James Stewart* in the 1950 movie, _Harvey_
  #38 (permalink)   Report Post  
zxcvbob
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Damsel in dis Dress wrote:
> "aem" >, if that's their real name, wrote:
>
>
>>Can't argue when a workman knows his tools. I didn't realize that
>>people used the cookers that flexibly. Thanks. Now, can you really
>>find a decent one for $20. I looked up some product 'reviews' and they
>>seemed to be in the $150 range.

>
>
> My pressure cooker/canner is still in its original box (I'm terrified to
> use it). But we paid around $20 on clearance, at the end of canning
> season. Not sure if they'd be carried in most stores this time of year.
>
> Carol



I paid $45 for a 22 quart Presto pressure canner about a year ago on
clearance. I already had 2 canners, but they make a lot of noise and DW
hates them. The Presto has a dial gauge and is silent, so I can do my
canning late at night without bothering anybody. (that was my
rationalization for getting it)

Here's a more reasonbly sized pressure cooker that can also be used to
can pint and half-pint jars:
http://www.goodmans.net/get_item_mi-...ure-cooker.htm

It would probably cost about $25 if you ever found it in a clearance
sale. 8 quart is a good size for a pressure cooker, and it's about the
smallest size you can still use for canning.

Best regards,
Bob
  #39 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article . com>,
"aem" > wrote:

> zxcvbob wrote:
> [snip]
> > Yesterday, I pressure cooked the ham hocks by themselves for about 45

>
> > minutes to maybe an hour -- I wanted them to pretty much dissolve

> into a
> > mass of gelatin. I picked the little bit of meat out of them and

> added
> > it back to the broth, added the partially soaked beans, 2 bay leaves,

> a
> > few grinds of black pepper, a pinch of summer savory, and some

> crumpled
> > dried hot peppers. I pressure cooked it for 10 minutes and let the
> > pressure drop slowly without quenching it. Meanwhile, I chopped up

> the
> > fat and skin and bones from the hocks and boiled them in a little

> fresh
> > water to extract the rest of the flavor. When I opened the cooker, I

>
> > strained the ham-water into the beans and stirred it up and tasted it

>
> > for seasoning. (it was pretty good and didn't *really* need

> anything)
>
> > I sauteed a half an onion and a little bit of celery in some

> vegetable
> > oil. Added it to the beans, along with a little garlic powder and a
> > little more black pepper. Simmered, uncovered, for just a few

> minutes
> > and it was done. [snip the rest]

>
> Can't argue when a workman knows his tools. I didn't realize that
> people used the cookers that flexibly. Thanks. Now, can you really
> find a decent one for $20. I looked up some product 'reviews' and they
> seemed to be in the $150 range.
>
> -aem
>
> p.s. the beans sounded great right up until you added celery....
>


<grins> The pressure cooker is more versatile than Sheldon knows.....
I don't know why he got the impression that anyone adds in all the
ingredients at once either! When I make stews or pot roasts, I _still_
pre-brown the meat (and that can be done in the bottom of an open
pressure cooker) then add my onions, garlic and spices, then pre-cook
that first! The other veggies are added later and it takes a fraction of
the time to finish a good pot roast than doing it in the oven or on the
stovetop with the large cast iron pot, and it does not heat up the house
as much in the summer.

I've personally never seen the 6 quart cookers for $20.00. I'd never get
aluminum, just stainless steel. They are more in the $35.00 to $40.00
range but, like any other good kitchen tool, they last forever. You just
have to replace the rubber parts from time to time.

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...user id=katra
  #40 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article . com>,
"Sheldon" > wrote:

> aem wrote:
> > Katra wrote:
> > [snip]
> > > If you know what you are doing with any recipe and add all the

> right
> > > ingredients and flavorings/spices in the first place, there is no

> > need
> > > to keep lifting the lid and "adjusting" it! [more snips]

> >
> > Well, I might not have said "crap shoot" but he's raising pretty much
> > the same question I've always had with regard to a lot of
> > slow-cooker/crockpot recipes I've seen, which is that they want you

> to
> > put all the ingredients in at once and then go away till it's done.
> > But when I make stew, for example, there's browning, and there's
> > caramelization, and some of the vegetables go in early and some go in
> > late and some later yet--you get the idea. If the pressure cooker
> > similarly makes you cook everything for the same length of time, then
> > the number of things that will come out well seems pretty limited.
> >
> > That said, the responses have given me more to think about than I

> knew
> > before, thanks.
> >
> > -aem

>
> How can one know when it's done... whether pot roast or spuds,
> whatever, they all don't cook in the same time, and you can't fork em
> if you can't remove the lid. I've never yet met two pot roasts that
> cook in the same time. Even potatoes, one batch will be perfectly
> cooked in 20 minutes, another batch may need 25 minutes... and why
> would anyone use a pressure cooker for potatoes... you may save all of
> 4 minutes and end up with a pot full of mush. If I can't know the
> level of doneness until after the gizmo is shut down then it's
> definitely a crap shoot[period]


Only if you don't know what you are doing... ;-)
I've _never_ had potatoes turn to mush in the pressure cooker!

Never.

>
> Of course if what you call food is what I call hog slop then that
> explains it.
>
> Sheldon


Don't knock it 'till you've tried it!

For once Shel', you are out of your area of expereince...

Sorry!

>


--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...user id=katra
Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
cooking dried beans sf[_9_] General Cooking 40 13-02-2011 10:45 PM
Pressure cooking dried pinto beans Melba's Jammin' General Cooking 39 08-12-2010 08:49 PM
What is the minimum size for pressure cooking dried beans Dee Dee Cooking Equipment 6 23-04-2008 03:33 AM
Curry plant [Was: It's about rice actually ;-) [Was: ? pressure cooking dried beans]] Phred General Cooking 7 06-03-2005 10:36 PM
Slow cooking dried beans C-Beeby Vegetarian cooking 11 25-08-2004 09:31 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 04:25 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2024, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2024 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"