General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #121 (permalink)   Report Post  
Sheldon
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Lena B Katz claims:
Brown rice is inherently inferior, and most families in India would be
ashamed to put it on the table.

Inferior how/why... brown rice is inherently more nutritious than white
rice, however to me, personally, brown rice is inferior, but only
because I don't care for it's flavor.

  #122 (permalink)   Report Post  
Lena B Katz
 
Posts: n/a
Default



On Fri, 4 Mar 2005, Sheldon wrote:

> Lena B Katz claims:
> Brown rice is inherently inferior, and most families in India would be
> ashamed to put it on the table.
>
> brown rice is inherently more nutritious than white
> rice, however to me, personally, brown rice is inferior, but only
> because I don't care for it's flavor.


they are two different species. I'd love to see the evidence that brown
rice is better than white.

Is this "evidence" coming from brown having more fiber? b/c the body
hates it when you give it fiber. makes body not happy.

lena
  #123 (permalink)   Report Post  
Bob
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Lena wrote about the difference between brown rice and white rice:

> they are two different species.


No, they're the same species. If you're THAT ignorant, there's really no use
talking to you. Do your homework first, THEN try to participate in the
discussion.

> the body hates it when you give it fiber. makes body not happy.


OH! I see the problem: You haven't been ingesting fiber, so you're full of
shit.

Bob


  #124 (permalink)   Report Post  
Sheldon
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Lena B Katz wrote:
> On Fri, 4 Mar 2005, Sheldon wrote:
>
> > Lena B Katz claims:
> > Brown rice is inherently inferior, and most families in India would

be
> > ashamed to put it on the table.
> >
> > brown rice is inherently more nutritious than white
> > rice, however to me, personally, brown rice is inferior, but only
> > because I don't care for it's flavor.

>
> they are two different species.


Nope... ALL white rice begins as brown rice.... to make white rice ALL
the good nutrition of brown rice is milled away.

I'd love to see the evidence that brown
> rice is better than white.


Never said brown rice is better, only that it's more nutritious, which
it most definitely is (check any food nutrition web site). What I
also said is that to me, *personally*, as in *subjectively*, white rice
is "better" only because I detest the flavor, and odor, of brown rice
(It STINKS like Indian/Chogie homes, ie. septic tanks). I don't much
care for white rice per se either, it's totally devoid of all
meaningful nutrition except cheapo starch carbs (ever heard of
beri-beri), and on it's own has little to no flavor... gotta mix in
flavoroids to make white rice more palatable than library paste. For
cheapo starch carbs I'd much rather dago pasta, in fact I've been
making 'rice a roni' (half rice, half pasta) from long before it's been
a marketed product... San Franny yer ass... it's really a Brooklyn
treat.

Btw, I've been a landlord for many, many years and have rented to lots
of different peoples... ever you rent to Indians (Asian) who do Indian
cooking, the only remedy after they leave is to have the house
incinerated, no filthier people on the planet, not even the entire
universe... do you know that Indian people never ever bathe, not even
once during their entire lifetime... when they die they still stink of
the same rotted placenta birthed them.

  #125 (permalink)   Report Post  
Damsel in dis Dress
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Lena B Katz >, if that's their real name, wrote:

>Is this "evidence" coming from brown having more fiber? b/c the body
>hates it when you give it fiber. makes body not happy.


Enter your insanity plea now and get it over with.

Carol


  #126 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article >,
zxcvbob > wrote:

> Katra wrote:
> > In article >,
> > Rodney Myrvaagnes > wrote:
> >
> >
> >>On Thu, 03 Mar 2005 14:10:59 -0600, Katra
> > wrote:
> >>
> >>
> >>>Thanks Sheldon! ;-)
> >>>
> >>>I've saved it with the others to the nutrition folder...
> >>>It appears that my problem with past attempts at stovetop rice was that
> >>>I never brought it to a boil. Just a simmer which was not initially hot
> >>>enough.
> >>>
> >>>Now, what is YOUR timing for brown rice cooked in chicken broth rather
> >>>than water? One poster said to cook for twice as long as white rice
> >>>which sounded about right.
> >>>
> >>>I have some saffron up in the cabinet and have never used it. I'll have
> >>>to give that a try. Does it really add flavor and not just color???
> >>>
> >>>Kat
> >>
> >>I cooked some brown basmati rice a couple of days ago according to the
> >>directions on the bag. It was 2:1 water to rice after rinsing the
> >>rice, same as white rice, but after coming to a boil simmer for 50
> >>minutes covered, and let sit 10 minutes, still covered, after turning
> >>the heat off. Then fluff with fork.
> >>
> >>It worked fine. I gritted my teeth to try it because I thought it
> >>would dry out. After all, the cover is just that. It isn't a pressure
> >>cooker. But it wasn't dried.
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>Rodney Myrvaagnes

> >
> >
> > So Basmati rice takes longer to cook?

>
>
> Basmati rice cooks just like any other long-grain rice. Fifteen to 20
> minutes for white basmati, and 45 minutes for brown unless you soak it
> first. If you soak it first, it cooks faster, but I don't know how much
> faster.
>
> Best regards,
> Bob


Well, in the pressure cooker (which is what started all this!) brown
rice cooks in 20 minutes once it comes up to pressure, and that takes no
more time than bringing the water up to boil I believe? :-)

Considering I do most of my cooking for my father and he will not eat
white rice, it's probably a better bet in the long run.

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...user id=katra
  #127 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article et>,
"Sherry" > wrote:

> "zxcvbob" > wrote in message
> >
> >
> > Basmati rice cooks just like any other long-grain rice. Fifteen to 20
> > minutes for white basmati, and 45 minutes for brown unless you soak it
> > first. If you soak it first, it cooks faster, but I don't know how much
> > faster.
> >
> > Best regards,
> > Bob

>
> Many years ago while watching The Frugal Gourmet "The Frug" said, well it
> was more of a plea actually, that white Basmati rice should never be cooked
> more than 10 minutes. I never cook it more than 10 minutes and it comes out
> perfect every time.
>
>


What is really amusing about the "cooking time" for rice is that nobody
adds the time it takes the water to come up to a boil to the total
cooking time...... <G>
--
K.
  #128 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article
>,
Lena B Katz > wrote:

> On Fri, 4 Mar 2005, Rodney Myrvaagnes wrote:
>
> > On Fri, 04 Mar 2005 00:36:29 -0600, Katra
> > > wrote:
> >
> >> In article >,
> >> Rodney Myrvaagnes > wrote:
> >>
> >>> On Thu, 03 Mar 2005 14:10:59 -0600, Katra
> >>> > wrote:
> >>>
> >>>> Thanks Sheldon! ;-)
> >>>>
> >>>> I've saved it with the others to the nutrition folder...
> >>>> It appears that my problem with past attempts at stovetop rice was that
> >>>> I never brought it to a boil. Just a simmer which was not initially hot
> >>>> enough.
> >>>>
> >>>> Now, what is YOUR timing for brown rice cooked in chicken broth rather
> >>>> than water? One poster said to cook for twice as long as white rice
> >>>> which sounded about right.
> >>>>
> >>>> I have some saffron up in the cabinet and have never used it. I'll have
> >>>> to give that a try. Does it really add flavor and not just color???
> >>>>
> >>>> Kat
> >>> I cooked some brown basmati rice a couple of days ago according to the
> >>> directions on the bag. It was 2:1 water to rice after rinsing the
> >>> rice, same as white rice, but after coming to a boil simmer for 50
> >>> minutes covered, and let sit 10 minutes, still covered, after turning
> >>> the heat off. Then fluff with fork.
> >>>
> >>> It worked fine. I gritted my teeth to try it because I thought it
> >>> would dry out. After all, the cover is just that. It isn't a pressure
> >>> cooker. But it wasn't dried.
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> Rodney Myrvaagnes
> >>
> >> So Basmati rice takes longer to cook?

> >
> > It sure does. I don't know why. I also haven't used a lot of different
> > brown rices, but I seriously doubt that all of them need that kind of
> > time.

>
> I think most brown rice takes double the time of regular to cook.
> (different species).
>
> Oh, well, the point is moot.
>
> Why must health food nuts conclude that because something is white, that
> it is bleached?


It's not bleached. It's polished.
The brown coating is taken off of the rice which removes most of the
vitamins, minerals and nutrition leaving nothing but pure starch behind.

Also, brown rice has more of a nutty flavor and it's really good!
The brown rice bag says 30 to 45 minutes cooking time but the pressure
cooker does it in 20 minutes.

>
> Brown rice is inherently inferior, and most families in India would be
> ashamed to put it on the table.


Nope! :-)

>
> lena


--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...user id=katra
  #129 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article .com>,
"Sheldon" > wrote:

> Lena B Katz claims:
> Brown rice is inherently inferior, and most families in India would be
> ashamed to put it on the table.
>
> Inferior how/why... brown rice is inherently more nutritious than white
> rice, however to me, personally, brown rice is inferior, but only
> because I don't care for it's flavor.
>


While I prefer it's flavor...

White rice, unless heavily flavored, tastes like library paste. <G>
It's a great carrier for other foods and flavors tho' which is why I use
broth rather than water to cook rice, regardless of whether or not it's
white or brown. It's a great base for stir fry's also, and goes well in
soups to add texture.

Seriously, does anyone here cook white rice with water, and then eat it
_plain_ with no salt, pepper, butter, gravy, etc.?????

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...user id=katra
  #130 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article >,
Lena B Katz > wrote:

> On Fri, 4 Mar 2005, Sheldon wrote:
>
> > Lena B Katz claims:
> > Brown rice is inherently inferior, and most families in India would be
> > ashamed to put it on the table.
> >
> > brown rice is inherently more nutritious than white
> > rice, however to me, personally, brown rice is inferior, but only
> > because I don't care for it's flavor.

>
> they are two different species. I'd love to see the evidence that brown
> rice is better than white.


I just did a brief google search and found _lots_ of info. on why brown
rice is more nutritious than white rice...

You are welcome to conduct your own. ;-) Go to http://www.google.com and
type in "brown rice".

>
> Is this "evidence" coming from brown having more fiber? b/c the body
> hates it when you give it fiber. makes body not happy.


You have _got_ to be kidding!!!
Rice bran is one of the best cholesterol lowering foods on the market!
Makes a yummy breakfast cereal with a texture similar to cream of wheat,
and it's a soluble fiber so very easy on the intestines.

I have issues with too much fiber also due to IBS so I understand a bit
what you are saying, but the alternative to a diet TOO low in fiber is
chronic constipation which will make your body even MORE unhappy!!!

>
> lena


--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...user id=katra


  #131 (permalink)   Report Post  
Gregory Morrow
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Sheldon wrote:

> Lena B Katz wrote:
> > On Fri, 4 Mar 2005, Sheldon wrote:
> >
> > > Lena B Katz claims:
> > > Brown rice is inherently inferior, and most families in India would

> be
> > > ashamed to put it on the table.
> > >
> > > brown rice is inherently more nutritious than white
> > > rice, however to me, personally, brown rice is inferior, but only
> > > because I don't care for it's flavor.

> >
> > they are two different species.

>
> Nope... ALL white rice begins as brown rice.... to make white rice ALL
> the good nutrition of brown rice is milled away.
>
> I'd love to see the evidence that brown
> > rice is better than white.

>
> Never said brown rice is better, only that it's more nutritious, which
> it most definitely is (check any food nutrition web site). What I
> also said is that to me, *personally*, as in *subjectively*, white rice
> is "better" only because I detest the flavor, and odor, of brown rice
> (It STINKS like Indian/Chogie homes, ie. septic tanks). I don't much
> care for white rice per se either, it's totally devoid of all
> meaningful nutrition except cheapo starch carbs (ever heard of
> beri-beri), and on it's own has little to no flavor... gotta mix in
> flavoroids to make white rice more palatable than library paste. For
> cheapo starch carbs I'd much rather dago pasta, in fact I've been
> making 'rice a roni' (half rice, half pasta) from long before it's been
> a marketed product... San Franny yer ass... it's really a Brooklyn
> treat.
>
> Btw, I've been a landlord for many, many years and have rented to lots
> of different peoples... ever you rent to Indians (Asian) who do Indian
> cooking, the only remedy after they leave is to have the house
> incinerated, no filthier people on the planet, not even the entire
> universe... do you know that Indian people never ever bathe, not even
> once during their entire lifetime... when they die they still stink of
> the same rotted placenta birthed them.



Yup...it's true, you don't even want them as neighbors, they stink up their
whole environs with the aromas of cooking grease and cheap curry...it
doesn't matter their income or caste...

On alt.home.cleaning their was recently a thread by someone who had just
moved into a place that had previously belonged to some dot heads, they were
asking for tips on how to clean the scrum of grease off of everything in the
kitchen, also IIRC the place just generally stank. The poster mentioned
that they were "respectable"..."respectable" or not it doesn't matter with
Indians, they all have that GREEZY aura about them...

I won't set foot anymore in an Indian resto or even an Indian bizness, even
if you are purchasing a non - food item when you bring it home you will be
probably be bringing home cock - a - roaches and such...

There used to be an Indian - owned convenience store down the block, the
place stank to high heaven. Upon a little investigation I discovered that
they were turning their freezer/fridge cases OFF at night to save $$$. I am
glad to say that the city sanitation inspectors shut the pesthole RIGHT down
within 24 hours of my calling them...

This kind of thing is SOP with that culture...

OH! and don't EVER fly Air India, their toilets are literally overflowing
with human waste, it's actually running out the terlet door and DOWN THE
AISLES of their planes...

--
Best
Greg
>



  #132 (permalink)   Report Post  
Gregory Morrow
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Katra wrote:

> In article >,
> Lena B Katz > wrote:
>
> > On Fri, 4 Mar 2005, Sheldon wrote:
> >
> > > Lena B Katz claims:
> > > Brown rice is inherently inferior, and most families in India would be
> > > ashamed to put it on the table.
> > >
> > > brown rice is inherently more nutritious than white
> > > rice, however to me, personally, brown rice is inferior, but only
> > > because I don't care for it's flavor.

> >
> > they are two different species. I'd love to see the evidence that brown
> > rice is better than white.

>
> I just did a brief google search and found _lots_ of info. on why brown
> rice is more nutritious than white rice...



Yup...it's true Katra...brown rice is one of the better complex carbs, white
rice is just about the worst, right on par with Wonder Bread (or even
*worse*)...

--
Best
Greg


  #133 (permalink)   Report Post  
Damsel in dis Dress
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Katra >, if that's their real name, wrote:

>Seriously, does anyone here cook white rice with water, and then eat it
>_plain_ with no salt, pepper, butter, gravy, etc.?????


No, but it's great served hot with milk and cinnamon/sugar.

Carol
--
"Years ago my mother used to say to me... She'd say,
'In this world Elwood, you must be oh-so smart or oh-so pleasant.'
Well, for years I was smart.... I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."

*James Stewart* in the 1950 movie, _Harvey_
  #134 (permalink)   Report Post  
Gregory Morrow
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Katra wrote:

> In article .com>,
> "Sheldon" > wrote:
>
> > Lena B Katz claims:
> > Brown rice is inherently inferior, and most families in India would be
> > ashamed to put it on the table.
> >
> > Inferior how/why... brown rice is inherently more nutritious than white
> > rice, however to me, personally, brown rice is inferior, but only
> > because I don't care for it's flavor.
> >

>
> While I prefer it's flavor...
>
> White rice, unless heavily flavored, tastes like library paste. <G>
> It's a great carrier for other foods and flavors tho' which is why I use
> broth rather than water to cook rice, regardless of whether or not it's
> white or brown. It's a great base for stir fry's also, and goes well in
> soups to add texture.



OH! I meant to tell ya...

One of the best ways to cook rice (I always use brown, done in my rice
cooker) is to throw a can of coconut milk in with the liquid...and into the
liquid I dissolve a half - pouch of Knorr Tamarind Soup Base powder (Knorr
makes lotsa neat and different flavorings/soup bases for various ethnic
markets). It's a Filipino thang, you can probably find it down yer way in
Asian or even Hispanic stores. If you can't find that, you can substitute
tamarind juice or even Key Lime juice, orange or lemon juice...the citrus
nicely complements the richness of the coconut milk. If concerned about
calories there is low - fat coconut milk out there, or just use a little
bit.

I also usually throw some hot red pepper flakes into this rice...

This all gives the rice a nice rich but piquant taste, you'll like
it...since yer such a "piquant" person :-)


> Seriously, does anyone here cook white rice with water, and then eat it
> _plain_ with no salt, pepper, butter, gravy, etc.?????



Google "congee"... ;-)

--
Best
Greg



  #135 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article t>,
"Gregory Morrow"
<gregorymorrowEMERGENCYCANCELLATIONARCHIMEDES@eart hlink.net> wrote:

> Katra wrote:
>
> > In article >,
> > Lena B Katz > wrote:
> >
> > > On Fri, 4 Mar 2005, Sheldon wrote:
> > >
> > > > Lena B Katz claims:
> > > > Brown rice is inherently inferior, and most families in India would be
> > > > ashamed to put it on the table.
> > > >
> > > > brown rice is inherently more nutritious than white
> > > > rice, however to me, personally, brown rice is inferior, but only
> > > > because I don't care for it's flavor.
> > >
> > > they are two different species. I'd love to see the evidence that brown
> > > rice is better than white.

> >
> > I just did a brief google search and found _lots_ of info. on why brown
> > rice is more nutritious than white rice...

>
>
> Yup...it's true Katra...brown rice is one of the better complex carbs, white
> rice is just about the worst, right on par with Wonder Bread (or even
> *worse*)...


White sugar? <G>

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...user id=katra


  #136 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article >,
Damsel in dis Dress > wrote:

> Katra >, if that's their real name, wrote:
>
> >Seriously, does anyone here cook white rice with water, and then eat it
> >_plain_ with no salt, pepper, butter, gravy, etc.?????

>
> No, but it's great served hot with milk and cinnamon/sugar.
>
> Carol


Ahhh yes!
Rice pudding........ ;-d

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...user id=katra
  #137 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article . net>,
"Gregory Morrow"
<gregorymorrowEMERGENCYCANCELLATIONARCHIMEDES@eart hlink.net> wrote:

>
> Katra wrote:
>
> > In article .com>,
> > "Sheldon" > wrote:
> >
> > > Lena B Katz claims:
> > > Brown rice is inherently inferior, and most families in India would be
> > > ashamed to put it on the table.
> > >
> > > Inferior how/why... brown rice is inherently more nutritious than white
> > > rice, however to me, personally, brown rice is inferior, but only
> > > because I don't care for it's flavor.
> > >

> >
> > While I prefer it's flavor...
> >
> > White rice, unless heavily flavored, tastes like library paste. <G>
> > It's a great carrier for other foods and flavors tho' which is why I use
> > broth rather than water to cook rice, regardless of whether or not it's
> > white or brown. It's a great base for stir fry's also, and goes well in
> > soups to add texture.

>
>
> OH! I meant to tell ya...
>
> One of the best ways to cook rice (I always use brown, done in my rice
> cooker) is to throw a can of coconut milk in with the liquid...and into the
> liquid I dissolve a half - pouch of Knorr Tamarind Soup Base powder (Knorr
> makes lotsa neat and different flavorings/soup bases for various ethnic
> markets). It's a Filipino thang, you can probably find it down yer way in
> Asian or even Hispanic stores. If you can't find that, you can substitute
> tamarind juice or even Key Lime juice, orange or lemon juice...the citrus
> nicely complements the richness of the coconut milk. If concerned about
> calories there is low - fat coconut milk out there, or just use a little
> bit.


I have some cans of coconut milk in the cabinet...
I considered using some today in the fried rice I just made, but decided
against it.

>
> I also usually throw some hot red pepper flakes into this rice...


Mmmmm...

>
> This all gives the rice a nice rich but piquant taste, you'll like
> it...since yer such a "piquant" person :-)


Hee! The dish I just finished made my neighbor drool due to the smell.
She asked for some when I was nearly done. <lol> She only wanted a
couple of spoonfulls but eagerly consumed the small bowl I gave her.

I made some brown rice in the pressure cooker last night to re-test my
method before posting it to someone that asked for it via e-mail. Since
I've been on a low-carb kick, it's been at least a year since I've
cooked rice.

I did 2 cups of brown rice with 1 quart of chicken broth and 1 cup of
water, 2 thinly sliced carrots, one chopped onion, some salt free lemon
pepper and a little garlic powder. Pressured it for 20 minutes then
tilted the weight after I turned it off. It came out a little bit wet so
next time I won't add an entire cup of water. Maybe 1/4 cup.

Dad was drooling over the cooker, just waiting for that rice! <lol> It's
been so long since I've served it... He munched a large bowl and I
doled myself out 1/4 cup.

I put the rest into the 'frige and it absorbed the remaining liquid
overnight which softened it a bit more. Brown rice has a nice chewy
texture that I like.

So, today, I scrambled up 7 eggs with a little bit of mozarella cheese
for richness, broke it up into small pieces and put it aside.

I then took one poblano chile and sliced that up in thin strips after
removing the core and seeds, chopped up another onion and sauteed' that
together in some EVOO in the cast iron skillet.

While that was cooking, I had a couple of braised chicken thighs left
over from yesterday and de-boned them, chopped them up into small pieces
and added that to the scrambled egg in the bowl.

I took the cold rice and added it to the now slightly carmelized onions
and pepper, and mixed that up well so it was all broken up, then added
the eggs, chicken and a can of well drained salt free sweet peas.

Fabulous. ;-d

>
>
> > Seriously, does anyone here cook white rice with water, and then eat it
> > _plain_ with no salt, pepper, butter, gravy, etc.?????

>
>
> Google "congee"... ;-)


Hmmmm... ok, so they cook it plain, but it looks like in most cases it's
not served by itself?

>
> --
> Best
> Greg


--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...user id=katra
  #138 (permalink)   Report Post  
Arri London
 
Posts: n/a
Default



Katra wrote:
>
> In article .com>,
> "Sheldon" > wrote:
>
> > Lena B Katz claims:
> > Brown rice is inherently inferior, and most families in India would be
> > ashamed to put it on the table.
> >
> > Inferior how/why... brown rice is inherently more nutritious than white
> > rice, however to me, personally, brown rice is inferior, but only
> > because I don't care for it's flavor.
> >

>
> While I prefer it's flavor...
>
> White rice, unless heavily flavored, tastes like library paste. <G>
> It's a great carrier for other foods and flavors tho' which is why I use
> broth rather than water to cook rice, regardless of whether or not it's
> white or brown. It's a great base for stir fry's also, and goes well in
> soups to add texture.
>
> Seriously, does anyone here cook white rice with water, and then eat it
> _plain_ with no salt, pepper, butter, gravy, etc.?????
>
> --
> K.
>


I do, although I eat it accompanied by my stirfry dishes. But the rice
is cooked without salt or fats. Those first few *plain* spoonfuls are
heaven! And cooking/eating it plain is a good way to judge the quality
and flavour of the rice.

Pilaf/pilau is another matter; the rice is sauteed in fat and flavoured
with herbs/spices.
  #139 (permalink)   Report Post  
aem
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Katra wrote:
[snip]
> Seriously, does anyone here cook white rice with water, and then eat
> it _plain_ with no salt, pepper, butter, gravy, etc.?????
> --
> K.


Well, yes, we eat plain white rice as the starch of our meals more
often than potatoes or pasta or pilaf or fried rice. It's often
flavored with the gravy from the entree, whether that's a Chinese
stirfry or fried chicken or a steak with mushroom sauce, but that's
incidental. Plain white rice cooked in water is very high on the list,
possibly even at the top, of the most eaten foods in the entire world.
You can't be surprised to hear this....

-aem

  #140 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article .com>,
"aem" > wrote:

> Katra wrote:
> [snip]
> > Seriously, does anyone here cook white rice with water, and then eat
> > it _plain_ with no salt, pepper, butter, gravy, etc.?????
> > --
> > K.

>
> Well, yes, we eat plain white rice as the starch of our meals more
> often than potatoes or pasta or pilaf or fried rice. It's often
> flavored with the gravy from the entree, whether that's a Chinese
> stirfry or fried chicken or a steak with mushroom sauce, but that's
> incidental. Plain white rice cooked in water is very high on the list,
> possibly even at the top, of the most eaten foods in the entire world.
> You can't be surprised to hear this....
>
> -aem
>


No....

But you made my point:

> It's often
> flavored with the gravy from the entree, whether that's a Chinese
> stirfry or fried chicken or a steak with mushroom sauce, but that's
> incidental.


You don't eat it PLAIN! :-)
--
K.


  #141 (permalink)   Report Post  
Phred
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article .com>, "aem" > wrote:
>Katra wrote:
>[snip]
>> Seriously, does anyone here cook white rice with water, and then eat
>> it _plain_ with no salt, pepper, butter, gravy, etc.?????

>
>Well, yes, we eat plain white rice as the starch of our meals more
>often than potatoes or pasta or pilaf or fried rice. It's often
>flavored with the gravy from the entree, whether that's a Chinese
>stirfry or fried chicken or a steak with mushroom sauce, but that's
>incidental. Plain white rice cooked in water is very high on the list,
>possibly even at the top, of the most eaten foods in the entire world.
>You can't be surprised to hear this....


I think I could handle a permanent diet of plain white rice for a CHO
source rather better than spuds or pasta. A good medium rare rump
steak with plain boiled rice is great! (Though I admit there are
probably some pan scrapings, if not gravy per se, to go with the
combo.)

Cheers, Phred.

--
LID

  #142 (permalink)   Report Post  
serene (Sandra Vannoy)
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Sat, 05 Mar 2005 12:51:26 -0600, Katra
> wrote:

>Seriously, does anyone here cook white rice with water, and then eat it
>_plain_ with no salt, pepper, butter, gravy, etc.?????


I love it. Seriously.

Especially when I'm sick.

Yum.

serene
  #143 (permalink)   Report Post  
Sheldon
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Katra wrote:
> In article .com>,
> "Sheldon" > wrote:
>
> > Katra wrote:
> > > Thanks Sheldon! ;-)
> > >
> > > I've saved it with the others to the nutrition folder...
> > > It appears that my problem with past attempts at stovetop rice

was
> > that
> > > I never brought it to a boil. Just a simmer which was not

initially
> > hot
> > > enough.
> > >
> > > Now, what is YOUR timing for brown rice cooked in chicken broth

> > rather
> > > than water? One poster said to cook for twice as long as white

rice
> > > which sounded about right.
> > >
> > > I have some saffron up in the cabinet and have never used it.

I'll
> > have
> > > to give that a try. Does it really add flavor and not just

color???
> >
> > I'm not a big fan of brown rice but occasionally (like every 5 yrs)

I
> > will give it another shot, brown rice (gack) always fails.

>
> If brown rice always fails for you, you could try a pressure cooker!



I've no problem with the cooking, it's its flavor that fails
"(gack)"... I also don't like the aroma of brown rice (gack).


Sheldon

  #144 (permalink)   Report Post  
aem
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Katra wrote:
> [snip]
> I do love rice! And I'm so sick of low carb I can hardly stand it,

but
> it is working. Once I can get this weight off, I look forward to
> re-adding more rice back to my diet.
>

I don't want to start anything with the diet faithful, but any diet
that thinks plain rice needs to be eliminated as part of a weight-loss
strategy is plain stupid.

-aem

  #145 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article >,
(Phred) wrote:

> In article .com>, "aem"
> > wrote:
> >Katra wrote:
> >[snip]
> >> Seriously, does anyone here cook white rice with water, and then eat
> >> it _plain_ with no salt, pepper, butter, gravy, etc.?????

> >
> >Well, yes, we eat plain white rice as the starch of our meals more
> >often than potatoes or pasta or pilaf or fried rice. It's often
> >flavored with the gravy from the entree, whether that's a Chinese
> >stirfry or fried chicken or a steak with mushroom sauce, but that's
> >incidental. Plain white rice cooked in water is very high on the list,
> >possibly even at the top, of the most eaten foods in the entire world.
> >You can't be surprised to hear this....

>
> I think I could handle a permanent diet of plain white rice for a CHO
> source rather better than spuds or pasta. A good medium rare rump
> steak with plain boiled rice is great! (Though I admit there are
> probably some pan scrapings, if not gravy per se, to go with the
> combo.)
>
> Cheers, Phred.



I will concur that rice is superior to spuds and pasta...

I DO like pasta still, but cannot eat wheat pasta.
DeBohls make a very good corn pasta, as well as rice pasta.
The corn is easier to prepare as it's easy to overcook the rice pasta.

We've not had a potato in the house now for a good 2 years.

I don't miss them.

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...user id=katra


  #146 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article . com>,
"Sheldon" > wrote:

> Katra wrote:
> > In article .com>,
> > "Sheldon" > wrote:
> >
> > > Katra wrote:
> > > > Thanks Sheldon! ;-)
> > > >
> > > > I've saved it with the others to the nutrition folder...
> > > > It appears that my problem with past attempts at stovetop rice

> was
> > > that
> > > > I never brought it to a boil. Just a simmer which was not

> initially
> > > hot
> > > > enough.
> > > >
> > > > Now, what is YOUR timing for brown rice cooked in chicken broth
> > > rather
> > > > than water? One poster said to cook for twice as long as white

> rice
> > > > which sounded about right.
> > > >
> > > > I have some saffron up in the cabinet and have never used it.

> I'll
> > > have
> > > > to give that a try. Does it really add flavor and not just

> color???
> > >
> > > I'm not a big fan of brown rice but occasionally (like every 5 yrs)

> I
> > > will give it another shot, brown rice (gack) always fails.

> >
> > If brown rice always fails for you, you could try a pressure cooker!

>
>
> I've no problem with the cooking, it's its flavor that fails
> "(gack)"... I also don't like the aroma of brown rice (gack).
>
>
> Sheldon
>


Oh! Ok, I understand...
To each their own!

To me, brown rice has a delightful "nutty" flavor.

But, if you've had trouble with Indian residents, that makes sense.
The smell can turn you off based on memory.

It was literally YEARS before I could appreciate the smell and taste of
curry again after living in hotels in Kansas for a couple of months when
I was 19.

Both hotels were run by Hindus and the places absolutely REEKED of
grease and curry mixed! :-P Nasty. And the hotels were only marginally
cleaned. We re-cleaned the rooms ourselves when we moved in.

Fortunately, it was winter so there were no roaches.

I learned to hate the smell of curry for a long time. It's only been in
the past couple of years that I've re-discovered how good it really can
be used in MODERATE amounts!

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...user id=katra
  #147 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article . com>,
"aem" > wrote:

> Katra wrote:
> > [snip]
> > I do love rice! And I'm so sick of low carb I can hardly stand it,

> but
> > it is working. Once I can get this weight off, I look forward to
> > re-adding more rice back to my diet.
> >

> I don't want to start anything with the diet faithful, but any diet
> that thinks plain rice needs to be eliminated as part of a weight-loss
> strategy is plain stupid.
>
> -aem
>


I have insulin resistance. ;-)
ANY starches are a no-no...

All of my carbs right now pretty much come from only fresh steamed green
veggies such as squash, brocolli, etc.

There are specific medical indications for eliminating starches and
simple sugars from the diet for awhile, and I needed to lose 123 lbs.
Fruit is also out. <sigh>

I'm also on Metformin.

I ate a couple of small servings of the fried rice I made yesterday
because I just could not resist. My heart rate shot up to 130 for about
an hour as it also shot up my glucose levels. :-P

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...user id=katra
  #148 (permalink)   Report Post  
Serendipity
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Sheldon wrote:


> I don't think saffron would go well with brown rice, not wild rice
> either... but taste is subjective. If your saffron is good quality
> threads (not ground), it should keep virtually forever, and yes,
> saffron imparts not only a gorgeous deep daffodil yellow color but also
> the flavor of the goddesses... about twenty threads per cup of white
> rice. Just so happened that Monday night I prepared saffron rice with
> basmati... basmati is a whole nother book.


Thanks for this tip. I just bought saffron threads and was unsure how
much to add to rice. I can't wait to try it!
>
> Sheldon
>


  #149 (permalink)   Report Post  
Arri London
 
Posts: n/a
Default



Katra wrote:
>
> In article .com>,
> "aem" > wrote:
>
> > Katra wrote:
> > [snip]
> > > Seriously, does anyone here cook white rice with water, and then eat
> > > it _plain_ with no salt, pepper, butter, gravy, etc.?????
> > > --
> > > K.

> >
> > Well, yes, we eat plain white rice as the starch of our meals more
> > often than potatoes or pasta or pilaf or fried rice. It's often
> > flavored with the gravy from the entree, whether that's a Chinese
> > stirfry or fried chicken or a steak with mushroom sauce, but that's
> > incidental. Plain white rice cooked in water is very high on the list,
> > possibly even at the top, of the most eaten foods in the entire world.
> > You can't be surprised to hear this....
> >
> > -aem
> >

>
> No....
>
> But you made my point:
>
> > It's often
> > flavored with the gravy from the entree, whether that's a Chinese
> > stirfry or fried chicken or a steak with mushroom sauce, but that's
> > incidental.

>
> You don't eat it PLAIN! :-)
> --
> K.


But I *do* and so do a lot of other people.
  #150 (permalink)   Report Post  
Sheldon
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Arri London wrote:
> Katra wrote:
> >
> > In article .com>,
> > "aem" > wrote:
> >
> > > Katra wrote:
> > > [snip]
> > > > Seriously, does anyone here cook white rice with water, and

then eat
> > > > it _plain_ with no salt, pepper, butter, gravy, etc.?????
> > > > --
> > > > K.
> > >
> > > Well, yes, we eat plain white rice as the starch of our meals

more
> > > often than potatoes or pasta or pilaf or fried rice. It's often
> > > flavored with the gravy from the entree, whether that's a Chinese
> > > stirfry or fried chicken or a steak with mushroom sauce, but

that's
> > > incidental. Plain white rice cooked in water is very high on the

list,
> > > possibly even at the top, of the most eaten foods in the entire

world.
> > > You can't be surprised to hear this....
> > >
> > > -aem
> > >

> >
> > No....
> >
> > But you made my point:
> >
> > > It's often
> > > flavored with the gravy from the entree, whether that's a Chinese
> > > stirfry or fried chicken or a steak with mushroom sauce, but

that's
> > > incidental.

> >
> > You don't eat it PLAIN! :-)
> > --
> > K.

>
> But I *do* and so do a lot of other people.


Most of the world's people have rice as their staff of life and the
vast majority of them mostly eat their rice plain.

Sheldon



  #151 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article >, Arri London >
wrote:

> Katra wrote:
> >
> > In article .com>,
> > "aem" > wrote:
> >
> > > Katra wrote:
> > > [snip]
> > > > Seriously, does anyone here cook white rice with water, and then eat
> > > > it _plain_ with no salt, pepper, butter, gravy, etc.?????
> > > > --
> > > > K.
> > >
> > > Well, yes, we eat plain white rice as the starch of our meals more
> > > often than potatoes or pasta or pilaf or fried rice. It's often
> > > flavored with the gravy from the entree, whether that's a Chinese
> > > stirfry or fried chicken or a steak with mushroom sauce, but that's
> > > incidental. Plain white rice cooked in water is very high on the list,
> > > possibly even at the top, of the most eaten foods in the entire world.
> > > You can't be surprised to hear this....
> > >
> > > -aem
> > >

> >
> > No....
> >
> > But you made my point:
> >
> > > It's often
> > > flavored with the gravy from the entree, whether that's a Chinese
> > > stirfry or fried chicken or a steak with mushroom sauce, but that's
> > > incidental.

> >
> > You don't eat it PLAIN! :-)
> > --
> > K.

>
> But I *do* and so do a lot of other people.


<shrugs> It was not meant as a criticism, not at all!
I was just curious...

I personally find plain white rice cooked in water to have almost no
flavor, but I do like the way it works as a recipe ingredient, and I
also like it sorta plain but with butter and some fresh ground pepper.

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...user id=katra
  #152 (permalink)   Report Post  
Damsel in dis Dress
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"aem" >, if that's their real name, wrote:

>Katra wrote:
>> [snip]
>> I do love rice! And I'm so sick of low carb I can hardly stand it,

>but
>> it is working. Once I can get this weight off, I look forward to
>> re-adding more rice back to my diet.
>>

>I don't want to start anything with the diet faithful, but any diet
>that thinks plain rice needs to be eliminated as part of a weight-loss
>strategy is plain stupid.


In the case of diabetics who are trying to lose weight, that's not the
case. We have to keep the carbs down in order to regulate our blood sugar
levels. Works well for diabetics even if they're at optimal weight.

That being said, we're having homemade chicken fried rice for dinner
tomorrow. I'll have a small serving as a side dish to a chicken breast
"half" and an enormous serving of buttered broccoli (Wow, that sounds like
the Carbohydrate Addicts Diet "CAD"). Crash loves the fried rice we make
at home so much, that it won't be much of a problem to stay away from
eating too much of it. It'll already be gone. LOL!

Carol
--
"Years ago my mother used to say to me... She'd say,
'In this world Elwood, you must be oh-so smart or oh-so pleasant.'
Well, for years I was smart.... I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."

*James Stewart* in the 1950 movie, _Harvey_
  #153 (permalink)   Report Post  
Serendipity
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Katra wrote:

> In article .com>,
> "aem" > wrote:
>
>
>>Katra wrote:
>>[snip]
>>
>>>Seriously, does anyone here cook white rice with water, and then eat
>>>it _plain_ with no salt, pepper, butter, gravy, etc.?????
>>>--
>>>K.

>>
>>Well, yes, we eat plain white rice as the starch of our meals more
>>often than potatoes or pasta or pilaf or fried rice. It's often
>>flavored with the gravy from the entree, whether that's a Chinese
>>stirfry or fried chicken or a steak with mushroom sauce, but that's
>>incidental. Plain white rice cooked in water is very high on the list,
>>possibly even at the top, of the most eaten foods in the entire world.
>>You can't be surprised to hear this....
>>
>>-aem
>>

>
>
> No....
>
> But you made my point:
>
>
>>It's often
>>flavored with the gravy from the entree, whether that's a Chinese
>>stirfry or fried chicken or a steak with mushroom sauce, but that's
>>incidental.

>
>
> You don't eat it PLAIN! :-)


I eat rice plain Just rice cooked in water. Sometimes though I
like a little pat of butter on white rice but I seldom eat white rice
anyway. Other rice is just fine plain to me anyway.

  #154 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article >,
Serendipity > wrote:

> Katra wrote:
>
> > In article .com>,
> > "aem" > wrote:
> >
> >
> >>Katra wrote:
> >>[snip]
> >>
> >>>Seriously, does anyone here cook white rice with water, and then eat
> >>>it _plain_ with no salt, pepper, butter, gravy, etc.?????
> >>>--
> >>>K.
> >>
> >>Well, yes, we eat plain white rice as the starch of our meals more
> >>often than potatoes or pasta or pilaf or fried rice. It's often
> >>flavored with the gravy from the entree, whether that's a Chinese
> >>stirfry or fried chicken or a steak with mushroom sauce, but that's
> >>incidental. Plain white rice cooked in water is very high on the list,
> >>possibly even at the top, of the most eaten foods in the entire world.
> >>You can't be surprised to hear this....
> >>
> >>-aem
> >>

> >
> >
> > No....
> >
> > But you made my point:
> >
> >
> >>It's often
> >>flavored with the gravy from the entree, whether that's a Chinese
> >>stirfry or fried chicken or a steak with mushroom sauce, but that's
> >>incidental.

> >
> >
> > You don't eat it PLAIN! :-)

>
> I eat rice plain Just rice cooked in water. Sometimes though I
> like a little pat of butter on white rice but I seldom eat white rice
> anyway. Other rice is just fine plain to me anyway.
>


What type of rice do you like?
Central Market carries a 4 grain wild rice mix that is very tasty with
just a little butter.

Overall tho', I prefer to cook rice (or pearl barley) in broth.....

Just a personal preference! :-)

Unless I want to make rice pudding of course! <lol>

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...user id=katra
Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
cooking dried beans sf[_9_] General Cooking 40 13-02-2011 10:45 PM
Pressure cooking dried pinto beans Melba's Jammin' General Cooking 39 08-12-2010 08:49 PM
What is the minimum size for pressure cooking dried beans Dee Dee Cooking Equipment 6 23-04-2008 03:33 AM
Curry plant [Was: It's about rice actually ;-) [Was: ? pressure cooking dried beans]] Phred General Cooking 7 06-03-2005 10:36 PM
Slow cooking dried beans C-Beeby Vegetarian cooking 11 25-08-2004 09:31 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 04:27 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2024, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2024 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"