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  #41 (permalink)   Report Post  
Sheldon
 
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zxcvbob wrote:
>
>
> I paid $45 for a 22 quart Presto pressure canner about a year ago on
> clearance. I already had 2 canners, but they make a lot of noise and

DW
> hates them. The Presto has a dial gauge and is silent, so I can do

my
> canning late at night without bothering anybody. (that was my
> rationalization for getting it)
>
> Here's a more reasonbly sized pressure cooker that can also be used

to
> can pint and half-pint jars:
>

http://www.goodmans.net/get_item_mi-...ure-cooker.htm

"Retains valuable nutrients lost in conventional cooking."

I read the above statement at that web site... sounds like a lotta
hooey to me. I don't quite see how that can be.... minerals aren't
lost in cooking by either method, minerals don't evaporate, neither do
vitamins but but some vitamins are destroyed by heat so I'd think since
pressure cookers operate at higher temps they would destroy more
vitamins. What other nutrients are they talking about... oh, fiber...
well, then higher temperatures also break down more fiber. Only other
way I know of losing nutrients from cooking in a pot is if one tosses
the cooking liquid down the drain... but that applies equally
regardless. And evaporation of water, water is not a nutrient. What
am I missing?

  #42 (permalink)   Report Post  
zxcvbob
 
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Sheldon wrote:
> zxcvbob wrote:
>
>>
>>I paid $45 for a 22 quart Presto pressure canner about a year ago on
>>clearance. I already had 2 canners, but they make a lot of noise and

>
> DW
>
>>hates them. The Presto has a dial gauge and is silent, so I can do

>
> my
>
>>canning late at night without bothering anybody. (that was my
>>rationalization for getting it)
>>
>>Here's a more reasonbly sized pressure cooker that can also be used

>
> to
>
>>can pint and half-pint jars:
>>

>
> http://www.goodmans.net/get_item_mi-...ure-cooker.htm
>
> "Retains valuable nutrients lost in conventional cooking."
>
> I read the above statement at that web site... sounds like a lotta
> hooey to me. I don't quite see how that can be.... minerals aren't
> lost in cooking by either method, minerals don't evaporate, neither do
> vitamins but but some vitamins are destroyed by heat so I'd think since
> pressure cookers operate at higher temps they would destroy more
> vitamins. What other nutrients are they talking about... oh, fiber...
> well, then higher temperatures also break down more fiber. Only other
> way I know of losing nutrients from cooking in a pot is if one tosses
> the cooking liquid down the drain... but that applies equally
> regardless. And evaporation of water, water is not a nutrient. What
> am I missing?
>


That particular statement you found probably *is* a lot of hooey. I
don't know what they are talking about.

Best regards,
Bob
  #43 (permalink)   Report Post  
Sheldon
 
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Don't knock it 'till you've tried it!

For once Shel', you are out of your area of expereince...

Sorry!

K.

I guess one doesn't miss what they don't know... you must really enjoy
two minute meals, goes well with your usual two minute sex! <G>

Sheldon

  #44 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
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In article .com>,
"Sheldon" > wrote:

> Don't knock it 'till you've tried it!
>
> For once Shel', you are out of your area of expereince...
>
> Sorry!
>
> K.
>
> I guess one doesn't miss what they don't know... you must really enjoy
> two minute meals, goes well with your usual two minute sex! <G>
>
> Sheldon
>


<raises eybrows>

2 minutes of sex??? TWO MINUTES???

Must be going by your own standards! <lol>
No wonder you are lonely!

I never go less than 2 hours!

As for quick meals, yeah, I really often don't have a lot of time during
the week to cook so speed is nice. That's why I live mostly on stir fry.
I only do serious, involved cooking on my days off.......

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


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  #45 (permalink)   Report Post  
D.Currie
 
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"aem" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> zxcvbob wrote:
>> [snip]
>> Let's see... The beans were raw when they went in, and cooked when
>> they came out. Cooking is a process, so I don't know why you think
>> this distiction is important.

>
> We've never had a pressure cooker, and I've never understood why they
> are used for cooking, since they seem to require extra care to avoid
> kitchen disasters. I'm curious to knw if there is any advantage to
> them other than saving time?
>
> -aem
>


I never thought I'd need one until I moved to a higher altitude. Most of the
time, I have no problem with letting things simmer as long as they need to,
but sometimes that's not practical. Dried beans and some long-cooked meats
end up taking way too long if I want to use them the same day. And the water
boils off faster, too, so that's another consideration.

A little farther uphill, and you get to a point where beans simply won't
cook all the way through, so you need a pressure cooker to get the job done.




  #46 (permalink)   Report Post  
serene
 
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On Mon, 28 Feb 2005 06:28:02 -0800, Katra wrote
(in article
>):

> Maybe not for you, but pressuring seems to be the only way I can ever get it


> right! :-P I've tried just steaming rice in a covered pot on the stove and it


> always comes out hard and crunchy. I've not figured out what I'm doing wrong!


> It just won't absorb the darned liquid, but pressuring makes perfect rice for


> me every time! :-)


Weird. I've never had a problem with it. Ah, well, glad you found a
way that works.

serene

  #47 (permalink)   Report Post  
Leila
 
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I don't. The Presto manual says do, but Deborah Madison in Vegetarian
Cooking for Everyone says don't bother. I tried the Madison way and it
works fine.

Google Leila +pressure cooker + beans for a couple of recent recipes. I
would use less water in the pinto bean recipe - it was from an early
iteration based on the Presto manual that came with my cooker.

If you follow manufacturer's guidelines you won't have explosions.

Turning dried beans into cooked soup in 45 minutes seems like a time
saver to me. Regarding taste - well I do tend to cook the things a
couple of minutes less than recommended and then finish cooking with
lid off after adjusting seasonings. Maybe certain persons who think the
things are an abomination just don't have experience with using them.

I also used it for a pot roast the other day when I realized I didn't
have time for conventional method. Am wondering if it would work with
my Mark Bittman braised lamb shanks recipe...

Leila

  #48 (permalink)   Report Post  
Leila
 
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Recipes that work best in crockpot or pressure cooker often start with
browning. Trouble with the crockpot is you must brown in a separate
utensil - really a pain in the ass, and defeats the so-called
convenience of the crockpot.

I like browning meat or sweating onions in the pressure cooker before
adding liquid, other ingredients and clamping on the lid. Yes, if you
just stuck cold meat and liquid in and pressure cooked, you would get -
boiled meat. Quick boiled meat. Now there are many fine boiled meat
recipes in world cuisines but they're aren't the fashion these days.
But if you should have browned the meat in the traditional style recipe
then you really ought to do it for the pressure cooker or crockpot
recipe, else you'll get that boring watery taste.

I've decided that the crockpot is no "timesaver" or convenience for me.
I mostly use it to boil up Chinese herbs that need to cook in a
non-metal pan. OTOH, the pressure cooker, which I'd always assumed was
an unnecessary appliance, gets used almost once a week around here, and
I'm not even cooking that much since I've been in chemo. (Which is done
btw, I'm just sweating out the last round of side effects).

I still don't see the big benefit to pressure cooking rice however.
First of all, I'd have to find a metal container that fits inside the
pressure cooker and is big enough to hold the rice. Too much work. You
have to do this in a covered interior container because the tiny rice
grains might clog the valve.

Leila

  #49 (permalink)   Report Post  
serene
 
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On Mon, 28 Feb 2005 23:18:14 -0800, Leila wrote
(in article . com>):

> Recipes that work best in crockpot or pressure cooker often start with
> browning. Trouble with the crockpot is you must brown in a separate utensil -


> really a pain in the ass, and defeats the so-called convenience of the
> crockpot.


I have a slow-cooker that has a removable, stove-safe pot -- I brown
the stuff, then put it on the slow-cooker base.

serene

  #50 (permalink)   Report Post  
Gregory Morrow
 
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Sheldon wrote:

Katra sez:
>> Pressure cooking food is never a crap shoot!
>> If you know what you are doing with any recipe and add all the right
>> ingredients and flavorings/spices in the first place, there is no need
>> to keep lifting the lid and "adjusting" it!

>
> Sheesh!
>
>> Shel' honey, just 'cause your mom did not teach you how to use one does

>
>> not mean that it's not a very cool cooking tool!.

>
>> There is more to than pressure! You are applying heat as well which
>> means you are "cooking" it.

>
>> And it does more than just save time!

>
>> Try yams or potatoes in a pressure cooker sometime!
>> And it makes the most wonderful pot roasts.......
>> K.

>
> Yeah, right... everything cooks in the same time, eh... I can see a
> slow cooker where everything is cooked *gently*, but tossing everything
> in a pot all at once and lettin' it RIPPPPP is NOT cooking.... that's
> culinary homicide!
>
> I'm very, very glad my mom didn't teach me how to murder food.
>



Cheap cuts of beef, e.g. blade/chuck roasts I braise on the stove top in my
Le Creuset dutch oven, takes two hours max to get a buttah soft result, and
during the last half of cooking I'll add the spuds, etc...

I rarely fiddle anymore with the oven for smaller cuts of beef or pork...a
pork roast too is just fine browned and then braised in beer, etc.on the
stove top...

I guess a pressure cooker would be okay for beef doing something like the
Cuban dish Ropa Vieja ("Old Clothes) or for bbq, but it's really not
necessary at least for me...

Now I have to ask Katra up there if her "cooker" has ever "exploded"...has
she ever found herself on top of the ceiling...heehee...

:-p

--
Best
Greg






  #51 (permalink)   Report Post  
Gregory Morrow
 
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Katra wrote:

> <grins> The pressure cooker is more versatile than Sheldon knows.....


;----D


> but, like any other good tool, they last forever. You just
> have to replace the rubber parts from time to time.



Oooooooh bay - bee...!!!

;-p

--
Best
Greg


  #52 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
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In article . com>,
"Leila" > wrote:

> I don't. The Presto manual says do, but Deborah Madison in Vegetarian
> Cooking for Everyone says don't bother. I tried the Madison way and it
> works fine.
>
> Google Leila +pressure cooker + beans for a couple of recent recipes. I
> would use less water in the pinto bean recipe - it was from an early
> iteration based on the Presto manual that came with my cooker.
>
> If you follow manufacturer's guidelines you won't have explosions.
>
> Turning dried beans into cooked soup in 45 minutes seems like a time
> saver to me. Regarding taste - well I do tend to cook the things a
> couple of minutes less than recommended and then finish cooking with
> lid off after adjusting seasonings. Maybe certain persons who think the
> things are an abomination just don't have experience with using them.
>
> I also used it for a pot roast the other day when I realized I didn't
> have time for conventional method. Am wondering if it would work with
> my Mark Bittman braised lamb shanks recipe...
>
> Leila
>


My mother made a divine shepards stew with lamb breast. :-)
She pre-roasted the lamb breast first to get rid of the majority of the
fat, then went from there.

It was always amazing......

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...user id=katra
  #53 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
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In article . com>,
"Leila" > wrote:

> Recipes that work best in crockpot or pressure cooker often start with
> browning. Trouble with the crockpot is you must brown in a separate
> utensil - really a pain in the ass, and defeats the so-called
> convenience of the crockpot.


Yay! :-)
I also brown stuff in the bottom of the open cooker first.
Mom taught me to do that.

>
> I like browning meat or sweating onions in the pressure cooker before
> adding liquid, other ingredients and clamping on the lid. Yes, if you
> just stuck cold meat and liquid in and pressure cooked, you would get -
> boiled meat. Quick boiled meat. Now there are many fine boiled meat
> recipes in world cuisines but they're aren't the fashion these days.
> But if you should have browned the meat in the traditional style recipe
> then you really ought to do it for the pressure cooker or crockpot
> recipe, else you'll get that boring watery taste.
>
> I've decided that the crockpot is no "timesaver" or convenience for me.
> I mostly use it to boil up Chinese herbs that need to cook in a
> non-metal pan. OTOH, the pressure cooker, which I'd always assumed was
> an unnecessary appliance, gets used almost once a week around here, and
> I'm not even cooking that much since I've been in chemo. (Which is done
> btw, I'm just sweating out the last round of side effects).


Hey, that's a good idea!
I gave my crock pot away since I never really used it.
Never thought of it for making infusions.

What kind of cancer do you have if you don't mind me asking?

>
> I still don't see the big benefit to pressure cooking rice however.
> First of all, I'd have to find a metal container that fits inside the
> pressure cooker and is big enough to hold the rice. Too much work. You
> have to do this in a covered interior container because the tiny rice
> grains might clog the valve.


Uh, no, I don't use any kind of interior container! I just dump the rice
into the pressure cooker and add 2 cups of liquid stock per cup of rice
plus a little extra, some garlic powder and a fresh chopped onion, mix
it up good with a little lemon pepper, slap on the lid and take it away!
When it comes up to pressure, I turn it down to low and let it pressure
for about 20 to 30 minutes.

Open it up and add anything else (like butter and a bit of fresh grated
parmesan cheese) and it's good to go!

>
> Leila


Kat
>


--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...user id=katra
  #54 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
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In article . net>,
"Gregory Morrow"
<gregorymorrowEMERGENCYCANCELLATIONARCHIMEDES@eart hlink.net> wrote:

> Sheldon wrote:
>
> Katra sez:
> >> Pressure cooking food is never a crap shoot!
> >> If you know what you are doing with any recipe and add all the right
> >> ingredients and flavorings/spices in the first place, there is no need
> >> to keep lifting the lid and "adjusting" it!

> >
> > Sheesh!
> >
> >> Shel' honey, just 'cause your mom did not teach you how to use one does

> >
> >> not mean that it's not a very cool cooking tool!.

> >
> >> There is more to than pressure! You are applying heat as well which
> >> means you are "cooking" it.

> >
> >> And it does more than just save time!

> >
> >> Try yams or potatoes in a pressure cooker sometime!
> >> And it makes the most wonderful pot roasts.......
> >> K.

> >
> > Yeah, right... everything cooks in the same time, eh... I can see a
> > slow cooker where everything is cooked *gently*, but tossing everything
> > in a pot all at once and lettin' it RIPPPPP is NOT cooking.... that's
> > culinary homicide!
> >
> > I'm very, very glad my mom didn't teach me how to murder food.
> >

>
>
> Cheap cuts of beef, e.g. blade/chuck roasts I braise on the stove top in my
> Le Creuset dutch oven, takes two hours max to get a buttah soft result, and
> during the last half of cooking I'll add the spuds, etc...
>
> I rarely fiddle anymore with the oven for smaller cuts of beef or pork...a
> pork roast too is just fine browned and then braised in beer, etc.on the
> stove top...
>
> I guess a pressure cooker would be okay for beef doing something like the
> Cuban dish Ropa Vieja ("Old Clothes) or for bbq, but it's really not
> necessary at least for me...
>
> Now I have to ask Katra up there if her "cooker" has ever "exploded"...has
> she ever found herself on top of the ceiling...heehee...


Never. Ever. :-)
Don't overfill it and that won't happen!
I've had a loss of pressure due to seals that needed to be replaced from
time to time, but that's it! No muss, no fuss!

>
> :-p


--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...user id=katra
  #55 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
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In article .net>,
"Gregory Morrow"
<gregorymorrowEMERGENCYCANCELLATIONARCHIMEDES@eart hlink.net> wrote:

> Katra wrote:
>
> > <grins> The pressure cooker is more versatile than Sheldon knows.....

>
> ;----D
>
>
> > but, like any other good tool, they last forever. You just
> > have to replace the rubber parts from time to time.

>
>
> Oooooooh bay - bee...!!!
>
> ;-p


Mmmmm... replace the rubbers for a hot time eh greg?

<lol>

Kat

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...user id=katra


  #56 (permalink)   Report Post  
Sheldon
 
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I just dump the rice
into the pressure cooker and add 2 cups of liquid stock per cup of rice

plus a little extra, slap on the lid and take it away!
When it comes up to pressure, I turn it down to low and let it pressure

for about 20 to 30 minutes.

Kat

Huh... an ordinary pot cooks rice in 12 minutes and with no
machinations... now I'm positive that what yoose pressure cukoos call
coozine I call hog slop even a hog won't eat.

  #57 (permalink)   Report Post  
Bob (this one)
 
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Sheldon wrote:

> zxcvbob wrote:
>
>>
>>I paid $45 for a 22 quart Presto pressure canner about a year ago on
>>clearance. I already had 2 canners, but they make a lot of noise and

>
> DW
>
>>hates them. The Presto has a dial gauge and is silent, so I can do

>
> my
>
>>canning late at night without bothering anybody. (that was my
>>rationalization for getting it)
>>
>>Here's a more reasonbly sized pressure cooker that can also be used

>
> to
>
>>can pint and half-pint jars:
>>

>
> http://www.goodmans.net/get_item_mi-...ure-cooker.htm
>
> "Retains valuable nutrients lost in conventional cooking."
>
> I read the above statement at that web site... sounds like a lotta
> hooey to me. I don't quite see how that can be.... minerals aren't
> lost in cooking by either method, minerals don't evaporate, neither do
> vitamins but but some vitamins are destroyed by heat so I'd think since
> pressure cookers operate at higher temps they would destroy more
> vitamins. What other nutrients are they talking about... oh, fiber...
> well, then higher temperatures also break down more fiber. Only other
> way I know of losing nutrients from cooking in a pot is if one tosses
> the cooking liquid down the drain... but that applies equally
> regardless. And evaporation of water, water is not a nutrient. What
> am I missing?


Slow, easy grounder...

Anybody...

Pastorio

  #58 (permalink)   Report Post  
Serendipity
 
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Katra wrote:

> In article >,
> Melba's Jammin' > wrote:
>
>
>>In article >,
>>Katra > wrote:
>>
>>
>>>I love pressure cooking for a LOT of things.
>>>It speeds things up and prevents things from drying out.
>>>
>>>I always use it for rice as well (30 minutes once it comes up to
>>>pressure, usually cook with meat stock) and it makes the most FABulous
>>>yams you've ever had!
>>>
>>>kat

>>
>>Huh? How much rice and what kind? I cook one cup of raw white long
>>grain rice in two cups of water in the microwave in about 15 minutes.

>
>
> I like to mix brown rice and black wild rice. :-)
>
> I've microwaved white rice as well and that works, but I inevitably make
> a mess in the microwave with the starchy liquid coming out, boiling over
> and making a nasty, sticky puddle on the bottom of the m-wave...
>

I haven't tried the pressure cooker for rice as the rice maker does a
nice job. Like you, my results using the microwave were awful. Cooking
rice on the stovetop never worked well for me either. I envy those who
can cook rice on the stovetop!
  #59 (permalink)   Report Post  
Serendipity
 
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Default

aem wrote:

> zxcvbob wrote:
>
>>[snip]
>>Let's see... The beans were raw when they went in, and cooked when
>>they came out. Cooking is a process, so I don't know why you think
>>this distiction is important.

>
>
> We've never had a pressure cooker, and I've never understood why they
> are used for cooking, since they seem to require extra care to avoid
> kitchen disasters. I'm curious to knw if there is any advantage to
> them other than saving time?


The modern pressure cookers are quite safe. I have two pressure cookers
and one pressure canner. While a pressure canner can be used for
cooking, a pressure cooker cannot be used for canning. Pressure cookers
are perfect for tenderizing tough cuts of meat quickly. Unlike a slow
cooker, you can brown the meat directly in the pressure cooker. You can
have a delectable meal start to finish in about 40 minutes instead of
having to leave a slow cooker on all day. I've never been comfortable
with leaving the house with the slow cooker on. Pressure cookers are
great energy savers as well.
>
> -aem
>


  #60 (permalink)   Report Post  
Serendipity
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Katra wrote:

> In article >,
> notbob > wrote:
>
>
>>On 2005-02-28, Sheldon > wrote:
>>
>>
>>>Musta applied heat to your brain too, for certain it's cooked.
>>>Pressure canning is a process, NOT cooking... cooking took place
>>>*prior* to the pressure process (which is a preserving process).

>>
>>More disinformation from the Village Idiot(tm).

>
>
> Yep... ;-)
>
> Pressure cooking food is never a crap shoot!
> If you know what you are doing with any recipe and add all the right
> ingredients and flavorings/spices in the first place, there is no need
> to keep lifting the lid and "adjusting" it!


I haven't found pressure cooking to be a crap shoot either. The trick
to any appliance is knowing how to use it properly
>
> Sheesh!
>
> Shel' honey, just 'cause your mom did not teach you how to use one does
> not mean that it's not a very cool cooking tool!.
>
> There is more to than pressure! You are applying heat as well which
> means you are "cooking" it.
>
> And it does more than just save time!
>
> Try yams or potatoes in a pressure cooker sometime!
> And it makes the most wonderful pot roasts.......
>




  #61 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article .com>,
"Sheldon" > wrote:

> I just dump the rice
> into the pressure cooker and add 2 cups of liquid stock per cup of rice
>
> plus a little extra, slap on the lid and take it away!
> When it comes up to pressure, I turn it down to low and let it pressure
>
> for about 20 to 30 minutes.
>
> Kat
>
> Huh... an ordinary pot cooks rice in 12 minutes and with no
> machinations... now I'm positive that what yoose pressure cukoos call
> coozine I call hog slop even a hog won't eat.
>


I Wasn't talking about instant rice Sheldon!

There is NO WAY that fresh, hard rice is going to cook in 12 minutes on
the stovetop! Hell I can't even get it to cook in a regular pot if I
leave it for an hour or so!

I can't stand instant rice. :-P

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...user id=katra
  #62 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
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In article >,
Serendipity > wrote:

> Katra wrote:
>
> > In article >,
> > Melba's Jammin' > wrote:
> >
> >
> >>In article >,
> >>Katra > wrote:
> >>
> >>
> >>>I love pressure cooking for a LOT of things.
> >>>It speeds things up and prevents things from drying out.
> >>>
> >>>I always use it for rice as well (30 minutes once it comes up to
> >>>pressure, usually cook with meat stock) and it makes the most FABulous
> >>>yams you've ever had!
> >>>
> >>>kat
> >>
> >>Huh? How much rice and what kind? I cook one cup of raw white long
> >>grain rice in two cups of water in the microwave in about 15 minutes.

> >
> >
> > I like to mix brown rice and black wild rice. :-)
> >
> > I've microwaved white rice as well and that works, but I inevitably make
> > a mess in the microwave with the starchy liquid coming out, boiling over
> > and making a nasty, sticky puddle on the bottom of the m-wave...
> >

> I haven't tried the pressure cooker for rice as the rice maker does a
> nice job. Like you, my results using the microwave were awful. Cooking
> rice on the stovetop never worked well for me either. I envy those who
> can cook rice on the stovetop!


Me too... <sigh>
I've just _never_ been able to get it to cook well for me on the stove
top! I don't have a rice cooker. :-) We don't eat enough rice to
justify another kitchen gadget... or is it good for anything else?

Actually, microwaving is ok, it's just messy! I really do prefer
pressuring it... The texture comes out perfect! And anything else I've
added to it (like chopped onions, celery and grated carrots) comes out
well cooked also.

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...user id=katra
  #63 (permalink)   Report Post  
Gregory Morrow
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Katra wrote:

> Mmmmm... replace the rubbers for a hot time eh greg?
>
> <lol>



Certainly...you *are* speaking of those old - fashioned *canning* jar
"rubbers", right...???

;-D

--
Best
Greg



  #64 (permalink)   Report Post  
Sheldon
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Katra wrote:
> In article .com>,
> "Sheldon" > wrote:
>
> > I just dump the rice
> > into the pressure cooker and add 2 cups of liquid stock per cup of

rice
> >
> > plus a little extra, slap on the lid and take it away!
> > When it comes up to pressure, I turn it down to low and let it

pressure
> >
> > for about 20 to 30 minutes.
> >
> > Kat
> >
> > Huh... an ordinary pot cooks rice in 12 minutes and with no
> > machinations... now I'm positive that what yoose pressure cukoos

call
> > coozine I call hog slop even a hog won't eat.
> >

>
> I Wasn't talking about instant rice Sheldon!
>
> There is NO WAY that fresh, hard rice is going to cook in 12 minutes

on
> the stovetop! Hell I can't even get it to cook in a regular pot if I
> leave it for an hour or so!
>
> I can't stand instant rice. :-P


You've never cooked any kind of rice, in fact from reading your posts I
know that you've never cooked anything, you *can't* cook.

Ordinary long grain white rice cooks perfectly in 15-20 minutes
or less, every package of rice says so... 12 minutes works well for me,
probably because I let rice soak in it's cooking water for about 30
minutes before turning on the heat... I've found the soaking results in
more separate grains. You need an hour or more to cook ordinary
rice... brown rice cooks in less than an hour... now I know with
absolute certainty that you are either a bold faced liar, a psycho, or
both... I vote both. No normal brained person cooks rice in a pressure
cooker... billions of consumate rice eaters on this planet cook rice in
an ordinary pot, have for thousands of years.

Sheldon

  #65 (permalink)   Report Post  
Damsel in dis Dress
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Katra >, if that's their real name, wrote:

>There is NO WAY that fresh, hard rice is going to cook in 12 minutes on
>the stovetop! Hell I can't even get it to cook in a regular pot if I
>leave it for an hour or so!


An hour? Something's not right. I cook mine for 15-20 minutes. How do
you make your rice on the stove? Maybe someone could figure out what's
going wrong.

Carol
--
"Years ago my mother used to say to me... She'd say,
'In this world Elwood, you must be oh-so smart or oh-so pleasant.'
Well, for years I was smart.... I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."

*James Stewart* in the 1950 movie, _Harvey_


  #66 (permalink)   Report Post  
ravinwulf
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Tue, 01 Mar 2005 12:48:06 -0600, Katra
> wrote:

>In article .com>,
> "Sheldon" > wrote:
>
>> I just dump the rice
>> into the pressure cooker and add 2 cups of liquid stock per cup of rice
>>
>> plus a little extra, slap on the lid and take it away!
>> When it comes up to pressure, I turn it down to low and let it pressure
>>
>> for about 20 to 30 minutes.
>>
>> Kat
>>
>> Huh... an ordinary pot cooks rice in 12 minutes and with no
>> machinations... now I'm positive that what yoose pressure cukoos call
>> coozine I call hog slop even a hog won't eat.
>>

>
>I Wasn't talking about instant rice Sheldon!
>
>There is NO WAY that fresh, hard rice is going to cook in 12 minutes on
>the stovetop! Hell I can't even get it to cook in a regular pot if I
>leave it for an hour or so!


Much as I hate to admit it, Sheldon's right this time, Katra. Simple
method: Put 1 part rinsed rice, 2 parts water* in a saucepan with a
tight lid. Bring it to a full boil, uncovered. Put the lid on, reduce
the heat to low, and let it cook for 15 minutes. Take it off the heat
and let it sit, covered, for 10 minutes or so. Fluff it up. Eat it. If
you're using brown rice, use a little more water and let it sit on the
heat for 45 minutes instead of 15. I make rice at least twice a week
this way and it's always perfect.


* A little butter or oil and a pinch of salt can also be added, if you
want.



Regards,
Tracy R.
  #67 (permalink)   Report Post  
Sheldon
 
Posts: n/a
Default


ravinwulf wrote:
> On Tue, 01 Mar 2005 12:48:06 -0600, Katra
> > wrote:
>
> >In article .com>,
> > "Sheldon" > wrote:
> >
> >> I just dump the rice
> >> into the pressure cooker and add 2 cups of liquid stock per cup of

rice
> >>
> >> plus a little extra, slap on the lid and take it away!
> >> When it comes up to pressure, I turn it down to low and let it

pressure
> >>
> >> for about 20 to 30 minutes.
> >>
> >> Kat
> >>
> >> Huh... an ordinary pot cooks rice in 12 minutes and with no
> >> machinations... now I'm positive that what yoose pressure cukoos

call
> >> coozine I call hog slop even a hog won't eat.
> >>

> >
> >I Wasn't talking about instant rice Sheldon!
> >
> >There is NO WAY that fresh, hard rice is going to cook in 12 minutes

on
> >the stovetop! Hell I can't even get it to cook in a regular pot if I


> >leave it for an hour or so!

>
> Much as I hate to admit it, Sheldon's right this time, Katra. Simple
> method: Put 1 part rinsed rice, 2 parts water* in a saucepan with a
> tight lid. Bring it to a full boil, uncovered. Put the lid on, reduce
> the heat to low, and let it cook for 15 minutes. Take it off the heat
> and let it sit, covered, for 10 minutes or so. Fluff it up. Eat it.

If
> you're using brown rice, use a little more water and let it sit on

the
> heat for 45 minutes instead of 15. I make rice at least twice a week
> this way and it's always perfect.


Why do you hate to agree with me... wouldn't you prefer to be on the
winning side rather than with the losers/lamers.

http://www.carolinarice.com/carolinarice/faq/faq1.cfm

Sheldon

  #68 (permalink)   Report Post  
aem
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Katra wrote:
[snips]
> Hell I can't even get it to cook in a regular pot if I
> leave it for an hour or so!


Here's an alternative method if you want rice when the pressure cooker
is already in use for something else. It has the advantage of being
uncritical as to quantities or timing.

1. bring large pot of water to boil--several times the quantity of
rice.
2. add rice--sprinkle it in, or stir once or twice to prevent
lumping.
3. let boil uncovered for 8 to 10 minutes or so, timing not
critical.
4. drain into colander or strainer. Return pot to stove with a
couple of inches of water, bring to simmer.
5. place colander or strainer or steamer basket above the simmering
water, cover the rice with a dish towel, cover the pot. Let it steam.
6. rice should be done in about 10 to 12 minutes, taste to test.
7. let rice continue to steam, or turn off heat and leave it there
to stay warm until you're ready to serve. Only thing that matters is
not to let all the water boil away and burn the pot!

Mind you, this is not how I cook rice because the closed pot method
works well on auto-pilot for me, but you might try it as an experiment
because the other way doesn't work for you. A friend who is a fine
cook swears that this method works every time.

-aem

  #69 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article et>,
"Gregory Morrow"
<gregorymorrowEMERGENCYCANCELLATIONARCHIMEDES@eart hlink.net> wrote:

> Katra wrote:
>
> > Mmmmm... replace the rubbers for a hot time eh greg?
> >
> > <lol>

>
>
> Certainly...you *are* speaking of those old - fashioned *canning* jar
> "rubbers", right...???
>
> ;-D


The rubber seals on the pressure cooker..... <lol>
--
K.
  #70 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article .com>,
"Sheldon" > wrote:

> Katra wrote:
> > In article .com>,
> > "Sheldon" > wrote:
> >
> > > I just dump the rice
> > > into the pressure cooker and add 2 cups of liquid stock per cup of

> rice
> > >
> > > plus a little extra, slap on the lid and take it away!
> > > When it comes up to pressure, I turn it down to low and let it

> pressure
> > >
> > > for about 20 to 30 minutes.
> > >
> > > Kat
> > >
> > > Huh... an ordinary pot cooks rice in 12 minutes and with no
> > > machinations... now I'm positive that what yoose pressure cukoos

> call
> > > coozine I call hog slop even a hog won't eat.
> > >

> >
> > I Wasn't talking about instant rice Sheldon!
> >
> > There is NO WAY that fresh, hard rice is going to cook in 12 minutes

> on
> > the stovetop! Hell I can't even get it to cook in a regular pot if I
> > leave it for an hour or so!
> >
> > I can't stand instant rice. :-P

>
> You've never cooked any kind of rice, in fact from reading your posts I
> know that you've never cooked anything, you *can't* cook.
>
> Ordinary long grain white rice cooks perfectly in 15-20 minutes
> or less, every package of rice says so... 12 minutes works well for me,
> probably because I let rice soak in it's cooking water for about 30
> minutes before turning on the heat... I've found the soaking results in
> more separate grains. You need an hour or more to cook ordinary
> rice... brown rice cooks in less than an hour... now I know with
> absolute certainty that you are either a bold faced liar, a psycho, or
> both... I vote both. No normal brained person cooks rice in a pressure
> cooker... billions of consumate rice eaters on this planet cook rice in
> an ordinary pot, have for thousands of years.
>
> Sheldon
>


I repeat an old post. I. Can't. Seem. To. Get. Rice. To. Cook.
Properly. On. The. Stovtop!!!

And I'm not the only one. :-P

Why do you think rice cookers are so popular? If it was that easy, those
would not sell!

And I nearly always add wild rice to my rice. It's less boring than
plain white rice.

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...user id=katra


  #71 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article >,
Damsel in dis Dress > wrote:

> Katra >, if that's their real name, wrote:
>
> >There is NO WAY that fresh, hard rice is going to cook in 12 minutes on
> >the stovetop! Hell I can't even get it to cook in a regular pot if I
> >leave it for an hour or so!

>
> An hour? Something's not right. I cook mine for 15-20 minutes. How do
> you make your rice on the stove? Maybe someone could figure out what's
> going wrong.
>
> Carol


Thank you Carol! :-)

I put the rice into a stainless steel pot, the ones with the "self
sealing" lids. I rinse the rice first in a colander then add it to the
pot with 1 cup of rice to 2 cups of water or chicken broth. I turn it on
to medium high with the lid off, and when it starts to simmer, I put the
lid on and leave it on low. I was taught that that was supposed to
"steam" it to perfection, but it just never seems to work somehow and
nearly always also ends up scorching on the bottom of the pot!

It must not be the right method, because it never works worth a damn.

Kat

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...user id=katra
  #72 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article >,
ravinwulf > wrote:

> On Tue, 01 Mar 2005 12:48:06 -0600, Katra
> > wrote:
>
> >In article .com>,
> > "Sheldon" > wrote:
> >
> >> I just dump the rice
> >> into the pressure cooker and add 2 cups of liquid stock per cup of rice
> >>
> >> plus a little extra, slap on the lid and take it away!
> >> When it comes up to pressure, I turn it down to low and let it pressure
> >>
> >> for about 20 to 30 minutes.
> >>
> >> Kat
> >>
> >> Huh... an ordinary pot cooks rice in 12 minutes and with no
> >> machinations... now I'm positive that what yoose pressure cukoos call
> >> coozine I call hog slop even a hog won't eat.
> >>

> >
> >I Wasn't talking about instant rice Sheldon!
> >
> >There is NO WAY that fresh, hard rice is going to cook in 12 minutes on
> >the stovetop! Hell I can't even get it to cook in a regular pot if I
> >leave it for an hour or so!

>
> Much as I hate to admit it, Sheldon's right this time, Katra.


I'll admit I don't know how to cook rice. ;-)
That's obvious... but Shel' COULD throw some hints my way and not be so
rude... but that's Sheldon! <sigh>

Thanks for the below:

> Simple
> method: Put 1 part rinsed rice, 2 parts water* in a saucepan with a
> tight lid. Bring it to a full boil, uncovered. Put the lid on, reduce
> the heat to low, and let it cook for 15 minutes. Take it off the heat
> and let it sit, covered, for 10 minutes or so. Fluff it up. Eat it. If
> you're using brown rice, use a little more water and let it sit on the
> heat for 45 minutes instead of 15. I make rice at least twice a week
> this way and it's always perfect.


Leave brown rice on low with the stove on low for 45 minutes before
removing from the heat?

>
>
> * A little butter or oil and a pinch of salt can also be added, if you
> want.
>
>
>
> Regards,
> Tracy R.


I'll give this a shot... I prefer to cook rice using stock or broth tho'
as it gives it more flavor.

Will the above still work???

Kat

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...user id=katra
  #73 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article .com>,
"Sheldon" > wrote:

> ravinwulf wrote:
> > On Tue, 01 Mar 2005 12:48:06 -0600, Katra
> > > wrote:
> >
> > >In article .com>,
> > > "Sheldon" > wrote:
> > >
> > >> I just dump the rice
> > >> into the pressure cooker and add 2 cups of liquid stock per cup of

> rice
> > >>
> > >> plus a little extra, slap on the lid and take it away!
> > >> When it comes up to pressure, I turn it down to low and let it

> pressure
> > >>
> > >> for about 20 to 30 minutes.
> > >>
> > >> Kat
> > >>
> > >> Huh... an ordinary pot cooks rice in 12 minutes and with no
> > >> machinations... now I'm positive that what yoose pressure cukoos

> call
> > >> coozine I call hog slop even a hog won't eat.
> > >>
> > >
> > >I Wasn't talking about instant rice Sheldon!
> > >
> > >There is NO WAY that fresh, hard rice is going to cook in 12 minutes

> on
> > >the stovetop! Hell I can't even get it to cook in a regular pot if I

>
> > >leave it for an hour or so!

> >
> > Much as I hate to admit it, Sheldon's right this time, Katra. Simple
> > method: Put 1 part rinsed rice, 2 parts water* in a saucepan with a
> > tight lid. Bring it to a full boil, uncovered. Put the lid on, reduce
> > the heat to low, and let it cook for 15 minutes. Take it off the heat
> > and let it sit, covered, for 10 minutes or so. Fluff it up. Eat it.

> If
> > you're using brown rice, use a little more water and let it sit on

> the
> > heat for 45 minutes instead of 15. I make rice at least twice a week
> > this way and it's always perfect.

>
> Why do you hate to agree with me... wouldn't you prefer to be on the
> winning side rather than with the losers/lamers.
>
> http://www.carolinarice.com/carolinarice/faq/faq1.cfm
>
> Sheldon
>


<sigh> Sheldong, just because I've had trouble getting RICE right does
not mean I can't cook other stuff. ;-)

I've posted a few recipes and I've never seen you flame them!

Like everyone else here, I still have things to learn BUT AT LEAST I
ADMIT IT!!!

And you are too chicken to try a pressure cooker. ;-)
They DO have their uses!

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...user id=katra
  #74 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article .com>,
"aem" > wrote:

> Katra wrote:
> [snips]
> > Hell I can't even get it to cook in a regular pot if I
> > leave it for an hour or so!

>
> Here's an alternative method if you want rice when the pressure cooker
> is already in use for something else. It has the advantage of being
> uncritical as to quantities or timing.
>
> 1. bring large pot of water to boil--several times the quantity of
> rice.
> 2. add rice--sprinkle it in, or stir once or twice to prevent
> lumping.
> 3. let boil uncovered for 8 to 10 minutes or so, timing not
> critical.
> 4. drain into colander or strainer. Return pot to stove with a
> couple of inches of water, bring to simmer.
> 5. place colander or strainer or steamer basket above the simmering
> water, cover the rice with a dish towel, cover the pot. Let it steam.
> 6. rice should be done in about 10 to 12 minutes, taste to test.
> 7. let rice continue to steam, or turn off heat and leave it there
> to stay warm until you're ready to serve. Only thing that matters is
> not to let all the water boil away and burn the pot!
>
> Mind you, this is not how I cook rice because the closed pot method
> works well on auto-pilot for me, but you might try it as an experiment
> because the other way doesn't work for you. A friend who is a fine
> cook swears that this method works every time.
>
> -aem
>


Neat idea... :-)
I do have a couple of screen colanders, but I AM going to give the
stovetop pot method one more try using the methods others have kindly
posted to me first.

I need to learn this......

Kat

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...user id=katra
  #75 (permalink)   Report Post  
Maverick
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Katra" > wrote in message
...
> In article >,
> Damsel in dis Dress > wrote:
>
>> Katra >, if that's their real name, wrote:
>>
>> >There is NO WAY that fresh, hard rice is going to cook in 12 minutes on
>> >the stovetop! Hell I can't even get it to cook in a regular pot if I
>> >leave it for an hour or so!

>>
>> An hour? Something's not right. I cook mine for 15-20 minutes. How do
>> you make your rice on the stove? Maybe someone could figure out what's
>> going wrong.
>>
>> Carol

>
> Thank you Carol! :-)
>
> I put the rice into a stainless steel pot, the ones with the "self
> sealing" lids. I rinse the rice first in a colander then add it to the
> pot with 1 cup of rice to 2 cups of water or chicken broth. I turn it on
> to medium high with the lid off, and when it starts to simmer, I put the
> lid on and leave it on low. I was taught that that was supposed to
> "steam" it to perfection, but it just never seems to work somehow and
> nearly always also ends up scorching on the bottom of the pot!
>
> It must not be the right method, because it never works worth a damn.
>
> Kat


Kat, I think you are missing something here. Everyone has been saying to
bring it to a full boil before lowering the heat. I think that has a lot to
do with your problem. :-)

Try it their way and let us know how it turns out, please.

Bret



----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet News==----
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  #76 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article >,
"Maverick" > wrote:

> "Katra" > wrote in message
> ...
> > In article >,
> > Damsel in dis Dress > wrote:
> >
> >> Katra >, if that's their real name, wrote:
> >>
> >> >There is NO WAY that fresh, hard rice is going to cook in 12 minutes on
> >> >the stovetop! Hell I can't even get it to cook in a regular pot if I
> >> >leave it for an hour or so!
> >>
> >> An hour? Something's not right. I cook mine for 15-20 minutes. How do
> >> you make your rice on the stove? Maybe someone could figure out what's
> >> going wrong.
> >>
> >> Carol

> >
> > Thank you Carol! :-)
> >
> > I put the rice into a stainless steel pot, the ones with the "self
> > sealing" lids. I rinse the rice first in a colander then add it to the
> > pot with 1 cup of rice to 2 cups of water or chicken broth. I turn it on
> > to medium high with the lid off, and when it starts to simmer, I put the
> > lid on and leave it on low. I was taught that that was supposed to
> > "steam" it to perfection, but it just never seems to work somehow and
> > nearly always also ends up scorching on the bottom of the pot!
> >
> > It must not be the right method, because it never works worth a damn.
> >
> > Kat

>
> Kat, I think you are missing something here. Everyone has been saying to
> bring it to a full boil before lowering the heat. I think that has a lot to
> do with your problem. :-)
>
> Try it their way and let us know how it turns out, please.
>
> Bret
>


Yes, I've read the other posts now and committed them to memory.
Looks like I was just not getting it hot enough! That makes sense.

I knew I had to be doing SOMETHING wrong since everyone else seems to be
able to do it, I was just not sure what it was! :-)

Thanks to all the polite and helpful people that posted the proper
cooking method!

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...user id=katra
  #77 (permalink)   Report Post  
Gregory Morrow
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Katra wrote:

> Leave brown rice on low with the stove on low for 45 minutes before
> removing from the heat?



Yup...it's true...perfect brown rice every time...you want to initially
bring the rice to a ROILING boil for a coupla minutes, then reduce heat to
simmer...then when ready yell to Sheldon "Rices' ready, honey...!!!".

)

BTW one of my fave easy and cheap meals is stir - fried asparagus served
over brown rice. To the asparagus I add garlic, soy sauce, some onion, a
bit of brown sugar, red bell pepper strips, etc. The SeKRet ingredient is
the brown sugar, the asparagus is like candy - ambrosia!



--
Best
Greg



  #78 (permalink)   Report Post  
Gregory Morrow
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Katra wrote:

> In article et>,
> "Gregory Morrow"
> <gregorymorrowEMERGENCYCANCELLATIONARCHIMEDES@eart hlink.net> wrote:
>
> > Katra wrote:
> >
> > > Mmmmm... replace the rubbers for a hot time eh greg?
> > >
> > > <lol>

> >
> >
> > Certainly...you *are* speaking of those old - fashioned *canning* jar
> > "rubbers", right...???
> >
> > ;-D

>
> The rubber seals on the pressure cooker..... <lol>



Okay ;-)

--
Best
Greg


  #79 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article . net>,
"Gregory Morrow"
<gregorymorrowEMERGENCYCANCELLATIONARCHIMEDES@eart hlink.net> wrote:

> Katra wrote:
>
> > Leave brown rice on low with the stove on low for 45 minutes before
> > removing from the heat?

>
>
> Yup...it's true...perfect brown rice every time...you want to initially
> bring the rice to a ROILING boil for a coupla minutes, then reduce heat to
> simmer...then when ready yell to Sheldon "Rices' ready, honey...!!!".
>
> )


Heh... I'll serve Sheldon rice all right!
Next time I find a nice roadkill.. <lol>
Those crawly little rice grains are supposed
to be a delicacy. <shiver>

Thanks for the hint tho'! I never have brought it to a rolling boil
before, just a good simmer! Nice to finally know what I've been doing
wrong. I'd given up ages ago and just used the m-wave or the pressure
cooker.


>
> BTW one of my fave easy and cheap meals is stir - fried asparagus served
> over brown rice. To the asparagus I add garlic, soy sauce, some onion, a
> bit of brown sugar, red bell pepper strips, etc. The SeKRet ingredient is
> the brown sugar, the asparagus is like candy - ambrosia!


Don't forget to add a small handful of sesame seeds! ;-d
I mostly stir fry in EVOO, but just a little dash of sesame oil can add
an extra oomph to stir fry's. You have to be REALLY careful with sesame
oil tho'!

If and when I finally get back into weight lifting, rice is a standard
food for low fat carbs for building muscle..... I used to mix rice with
tuna or chopped chicken breast with a light grating of fresh parmesan
cheese for extra flavoring.

I live for the day when I can deadlift 210 lbs. again. <sigh> I MISS
being that strong! It's been a good 10 years since I was serious about
it.

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


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Katra
 
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In article et>,
"Gregory Morrow"
<gregorymorrowEMERGENCYCANCELLATIONARCHIMEDES@eart hlink.net> wrote:

> Katra wrote:
>
> > In article et>,
> > "Gregory Morrow"
> > <gregorymorrowEMERGENCYCANCELLATIONARCHIMEDES@eart hlink.net> wrote:
> >
> > > Katra wrote:
> > >
> > > > Mmmmm... replace the rubbers for a hot time eh greg?
> > > >
> > > > <lol>
> > >
> > >
> > > Certainly...you *are* speaking of those old - fashioned *canning* jar
> > > "rubbers", right...???
> > >
> > > ;-D

> >
> > The rubber seals on the pressure cooker..... <lol>

>
>
> Okay ;-)


<rolls eyes and laughs...>

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


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