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  #81 (permalink)   Report Post  
notbob
 
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On 2005-03-02, Katra > wrote:


> I was taught that that was supposed to
> "steam" it to perfection, but it just never seems to work somehow and
> nearly always also ends up scorching on the bottom of the pot!


The trick is to get that rice up off the bottom of the pan. Steam
your rice like you would steam anything else. Fill a heat proof bowl
with the desired amount of washed rice and cover rice with about an
inch of water (I measure 1 knuckle deep). Steam for about 25-35 mins
in a covered steamer. The steam will supply the heat, the rice will
absorb the water in the bowl, and you will have fluffy steamed rice
(fluff with fork) that is not scorched.

The other solution is to get an electric rice cooker. These things
are basically idiot proof and cook rice to perfection. About the only
part of the rice eating world that hasn't changed over to this now
ubiquitous appliance are those who don't have anything to plug it
into.

nb
  #82 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
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In article >,
notbob > wrote:

> On 2005-03-02, Katra > wrote:
>
>
> > I was taught that that was supposed to
> > "steam" it to perfection, but it just never seems to work somehow and
> > nearly always also ends up scorching on the bottom of the pot!

>
> The trick is to get that rice up off the bottom of the pan. Steam
> your rice like you would steam anything else. Fill a heat proof bowl
> with the desired amount of washed rice and cover rice with about an
> inch of water (I measure 1 knuckle deep). Steam for about 25-35 mins
> in a covered steamer. The steam will supply the heat, the rice will
> absorb the water in the bowl, and you will have fluffy steamed rice
> (fluff with fork) that is not scorched.
>
> The other solution is to get an electric rice cooker. These things
> are basically idiot proof and cook rice to perfection. About the only
> part of the rice eating world that hasn't changed over to this now
> ubiquitous appliance are those who don't have anything to plug it
> into.
>
> nb


And Sheldon.... ;-)

Thanks!
Kat
--
K.
  #83 (permalink)   Report Post  
Damsel in dis Dress
 
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Katra >, if that's their real name, wrote:

>I put the rice into a stainless steel pot, the ones with the "self
>sealing" lids. I rinse the rice first in a colander then add it to the
>pot with 1 cup of rice to 2 cups of water or chicken broth. I turn it on
>to medium high with the lid off, and when it starts to simmer, I put the
>lid on and leave it on low. I was taught that that was supposed to
>"steam" it to perfection, but it just never seems to work somehow and
>nearly always also ends up scorching on the bottom of the pot!
>
>It must not be the right method, because it never works worth a damn.


That's precisely how I make mine, with one exception. I use a 1:1 ratio of
water to rice. Picked that up in a Chinese cookbook. It lets you make
fried rice with freshly cooked rice.

Carol
--
"Years ago my mother used to say to me... She'd say,
'In this world Elwood, you must be oh-so smart or oh-so pleasant.'
Well, for years I was smart.... I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."

*James Stewart* in the 1950 movie, _Harvey_
  #84 (permalink)   Report Post  
Phred
 
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In article >,
Katra > wrote:
[snip]
>I repeat an old post. I. Can't. Seem. To. Get. Rice. To. Cook.
>Properly. On. The. Stovtop!!!


G'day Katra,

This has got me intrigued! I've regularly cooked long grain white
rice in one of two ways, both with equal success at achieving expected
results. I've also used the second method for arborio rice etc. In
both cases most "recipes" call for adding salt to the water, but these
days I give it barely a token pinch. (A mate recently mentioned
"currying" the rice by adding a teaspoon of curry powder to the water
in the absorption method. I've tried it and it works well. :-)

Firstly, whichever way it's done, I first rinse the rice in cold [tap]
water until the rinse water runs pretty clear. Then:

Surplus water method -- Water/rice = 8/1
Bring water to boil, add rice, boil uncovered for 12 minutes.
Drain and it's ready to eat.

Absorption method -- Water/rice = 2/1
Bring water and rice to the boil, turn heat down to a *slow* simmer
and cook for 20 minutes tightly covered.
At the end all the water should be absorbed, so just eat.
[Note: I sometimes find this ends up a bit dry for my needs and taste,
so I tend to add a whisker more than 2 cups water per cup of rice --
but, bearing in mind I'm usually only cooking about 1/3 cup of rice,
this break with principle probably amounts to only about 3/4 a cup of
water rather than 2/3.]

Now *brown* rice is another matter entirely. It takes a *lot* longer
to cook and I have to confess I haven't yet managed to get it "done"
entirely to my satisfaction. :-(

I'm left wondering if you have a problem with boiling point depression
of water due to altitude? For example, while the standard boiling
point of water is 212F, if you're living at around 5000 feet above sea
level your "normal" BP would be around 203F (depending on actual
barometric pressure of course). Maybe that 9F makes the difference?
Especially as a change of only 10C (18F) will halve (-10C) or double
(+10C) the rate of a first order chemical reaction -- and will
similarly affect the rate of more complex reactions, though perhaps
not to the same extent. (My phys chem expires at this point.

I did a bit of googling for an example of the effect of altitude on BP
of water. The best I could come up with on a quick squiz was:
<http://www.biggreenegg.com/boilingPoint.htm>
where you can feed in your own data, or just read the table -- but I'm
only assuming the author has got it right!

>And I'm not the only one. :-P
>
>Why do you think rice cookers are so popular? If it was that easy, those
>would not sell!
>
>And I nearly always add wild rice to my rice. It's less boring than
>plain white rice.


Cheers, Phred.

--
LID

  #85 (permalink)   Report Post  
Hahabogus
 
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(Phred) wrote in
:

> In article >,
> Katra > wrote:
> [snip]
> >I repeat an old post. I. Can't. Seem. To. Get. Rice. To. Cook.
> >Properly. On. The. Stovtop!!!

>
> G'day Katra,
>
> This has got me intrigued! I've regularly cooked long grain white
> rice in one of two ways, both with equal success at achieving
> expected results. I've also used the second method for arborio rice
> etc. In both cases most "recipes" call for adding salt to the
> water, but these days I give it barely a token pinch. (A mate
> recently mentioned "currying" the rice by adding a teaspoon of curry
> powder to the water in the absorption method. I've tried it and it
> works well. :-)
>


Before I got a rice cooker, I used the Microwave to cook my rice. As I
failed at stove top rice cooking too. I used a ratio of 2 to 1. 2 mugs of
water to 1 mug of long grain rice. It took me a while to get the timing
down...but was well worth it. I would pour the coffee mug of rice in a
heat proof glass (pyrex) 'pot'(no lid), add some chicken stock granules
or cumin for seasoning and two mugs of water. I didn't rinse. Perhaps
your rice needs to be rinsed...I would cut back the water added then as
the 'wet' rice would hold say 1/4 cup of liquid. Well onwards...I found
that 22 minutes on high in the microwave worked for me and my microwave
when cooking the 1 mug of rice. My guess is that the coffee mug I used
was about 10 fluid ounces in capacity, so you'd need to work out the
timing for yourself. The mug allowed for enough rice cooked for a decent
serving for 2 kids and 2 adults as a side dish, with another veggie.

As I was looking for the magic 22 minutes cooking time I would check the
rice, by seeing if there was water in the bottom of the pot after 15
minutes. If so 5 minute of time got added. If not, rice was served time
noted and 1 minute was removed for the starting cooking time next batch.
After about 8 meals 22 minutes was the time I settled on.


--
No Bread Crumbs were hurt in the making of this Meal.
Type 2 Diabetic 1AC 5.6mmol or 101mg/dl
Continuing to be Manitoban


  #86 (permalink)   Report Post  
Serendipity
 
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Default

Katra wrote:

<snip>
>
> <sigh> Sheldong, just because I've had trouble getting RICE right does
> not mean I can't cook other stuff. ;-)
>
> I've posted a few recipes and I've never seen you flame them!
>
> Like everyone else here, I still have things to learn BUT AT LEAST I
> ADMIT IT!!!
>
> And you are too chicken to try a pressure cooker. ;-)
> They DO have their uses!


Speaking of chicken and pressure cookers, I'm making homemade chicken
noodle soup using the pressure cooker today. Contents in the pressure
cooker will be onion, celery, carrot, chicken, seasonings, and water.
Once pressure cooked, this will form a lovely broth and meat that falls
from the bone. On the stovetop, this would take 3 - 4 hours; pressure
cooking will achieve the same results in 45 min. The meat will be cut
into bite size pieces and returned to the pot. The bones, celery, and
carrot will be removed. From there, I will take it to homemade chicken
noodle soup with additional liquid, maggi, chives, and broad noodles.
I'm thinking a little white wine might be nice as part of the additional
liquid. Finally, broad egg noodles will be added for a hearty,
nutritious soup. I plan on serving the soup with homemade white bread.
>


  #87 (permalink)   Report Post  
Serendipity
 
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notbob wrote:

> On 2005-03-02, Katra > wrote:
>
>
>
>>I was taught that that was supposed to
>>"steam" it to perfection, but it just never seems to work somehow and
>>nearly always also ends up scorching on the bottom of the pot!

>
>
> The trick is to get that rice up off the bottom of the pan. Steam
> your rice like you would steam anything else. Fill a heat proof bowl
> with the desired amount of washed rice and cover rice with about an
> inch of water (I measure 1 knuckle deep). Steam for about 25-35 mins
> in a covered steamer. The steam will supply the heat, the rice will
> absorb the water in the bowl, and you will have fluffy steamed rice
> (fluff with fork) that is not scorched.
>
> The other solution is to get an electric rice cooker. These things
> are basically idiot proof and cook rice to perfection. About the only
> part of the rice eating world that hasn't changed over to this now
> ubiquitous appliance are those who don't have anything to plug it


I'll second the electric rice cooker. I cook rice a couple of times a
week during the winter. No muss, no fuss, just perfect rice everytime!
I have a Faberware Nutri Steam rice cooker. It has a removable
non-stick pot as well as a shallow steamer basket. While I have cooked
a variety of rices in the rice cooker, I have not used the steamer
basket other than in another pot. One nice thing about rice is you can
easily change the flavour just by changing the liquid you cook it in.
> into.
>
> nb


  #89 (permalink)   Report Post  
Sheldon
 
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Katra replies:

>Gregory M. asks:
>> Now I have to ask Katra up there if her "cooker" has ever

"exploded"...has
>> she ever found herself on top of the ceiling...heehee...


>Never. Ever. :-)
>Don't overfill it and that won't happen!
>I've had a loss of pressure due to seals that needed to be replaced

from
>time to time, but that's it! No muss, no fuss!


Lotsa older gals seem to share that problem... have you tried yoga?
hehe

  #90 (permalink)   Report Post  
zxcvbob
 
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Bubbabob wrote:
> "Gregory Morrow"
> <gregorymorrowEMERGENCYCANCELLATIONARCHIMEDES@eart hlink.net> wrote:
>
>
>>I guess a pressure cooker would be okay for beef doing something like the
>>Cuban dish Ropa Vieja ("Old Clothes) or for bbq, but it's really not
>>necessary at least for me...
>>

>
>
> How could you possibly make BBQ in a pressure cooker? It requires a wood or
> charcoal fire and a cooking temperature of 225F.




Notice that I never claimed to make bbq in a pressure cooker. But what
I have done several times is take a big tough gristly chuck roast and
pressure cook it on a rack. (The gristle turns to gelatin.) Save the
broth for another use. Carefully (so it doesn't fall apart) transfer
the meat to the smoke barrel and smoke it for a couple of hours to dry
it out a little and give it a smokey taste and color. The end result
doesn't have a bright red "smoke ring", and the bark is too thin, but is
otherwise almost indestiguishabled from real barbecue that spent all
night in 225 degree pit.

Best regards,
Bob


  #91 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
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Default

In article >,
(Phred) wrote:

> In article >,
> Katra > wrote:
> [snip]
> >I repeat an old post. I. Can't. Seem. To. Get. Rice. To. Cook.
> >Properly. On. The. Stovtop!!!

>
> G'day Katra,
>
> This has got me intrigued! I've regularly cooked long grain white
> rice in one of two ways, both with equal success at achieving expected
> results. I've also used the second method for arborio rice etc. In
> both cases most "recipes" call for adding salt to the water, but these
> days I give it barely a token pinch. (A mate recently mentioned
> "currying" the rice by adding a teaspoon of curry powder to the water
> in the absorption method. I've tried it and it works well. :-)

<snipped>
>
> Now *brown* rice is another matter entirely. It takes a *lot* longer
> to cook and I have to confess I haven't yet managed to get it "done"
> entirely to my satisfaction. :-(
>
> I'm left wondering if you have a problem with boiling point depression

<snipped>
>
> Cheers, Phred.


Thanks Phred!

We use mostly brown rice...
The problem seems to be that I never brought it up to a boil.

I'll give it another shot this weekend and see what happens, thanks!

Kat

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...user id=katra
  #92 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
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Default

In article >,
Hahabogus > wrote:

> (Phred) wrote in
> :
>
> > In article >,
> > Katra > wrote:
> > [snip]
> > >I repeat an old post. I. Can't. Seem. To. Get. Rice. To. Cook.
> > >Properly. On. The. Stovtop!!!

> >
> > G'day Katra,
> >
> > This has got me intrigued! I've regularly cooked long grain white
> > rice in one of two ways, both with equal success at achieving
> > expected results. I've also used the second method for arborio rice
> > etc. In both cases most "recipes" call for adding salt to the
> > water, but these days I give it barely a token pinch. (A mate
> > recently mentioned "currying" the rice by adding a teaspoon of curry
> > powder to the water in the absorption method. I've tried it and it
> > works well. :-)
> >

>
> Before I got a rice cooker, I used the Microwave to cook my rice. As I
> failed at stove top rice cooking too. I used a ratio of 2 to 1. 2 mugs of
> water to 1 mug of long grain rice. It took me a while to get the timing
> down...but was well worth it. I would pour the coffee mug of rice in a
> heat proof glass (pyrex) 'pot'(no lid), add some chicken stock granules
> or cumin for seasoning and two mugs of water. I didn't rinse. Perhaps
> your rice needs to be rinsed...I would cut back the water added then as
> the 'wet' rice would hold say 1/4 cup of liquid. Well onwards...I found
> that 22 minutes on high in the microwave worked for me and my microwave
> when cooking the 1 mug of rice. My guess is that the coffee mug I used
> was about 10 fluid ounces in capacity, so you'd need to work out the
> timing for yourself. The mug allowed for enough rice cooked for a decent
> serving for 2 kids and 2 adults as a side dish, with another veggie.
>
> As I was looking for the magic 22 minutes cooking time I would check the
> rice, by seeing if there was water in the bottom of the pot after 15
> minutes. If so 5 minute of time got added. If not, rice was served time
> noted and 1 minute was removed for the starting cooking time next batch.
> After about 8 meals 22 minutes was the time I settled on.


Microwaving always works well... I just need to get a deeper pyrex or
corningware! Mine tends to boil over.

I prefer to always use chicken or beef broth in place of water, or a
bullion cube in the water prior to adding it to the rice.

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...user id=katra
  #93 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article >,
Damsel in dis Dress > wrote:

> Katra >, if that's their real name, wrote:
>
> >I put the rice into a stainless steel pot, the ones with the "self
> >sealing" lids. I rinse the rice first in a colander then add it to the
> >pot with 1 cup of rice to 2 cups of water or chicken broth. I turn it on
> >to medium high with the lid off, and when it starts to simmer, I put the
> >lid on and leave it on low. I was taught that that was supposed to
> >"steam" it to perfection, but it just never seems to work somehow and
> >nearly always also ends up scorching on the bottom of the pot!
> >
> >It must not be the right method, because it never works worth a damn.

>
> That's precisely how I make mine, with one exception. I use a 1:1 ratio of
> water to rice. Picked that up in a Chinese cookbook. It lets you make
> fried rice with freshly cooked rice.
>
> Carol


Cool... but the consensus seems to be that I need to bring it up to a
full boil, not just simmer!

I've read recipes for mexican fried rice that start with DRY rice in the
pan! Never have had the nerve to try that. :-) I make fried rice with
fully cooked rice. I just don't add a lot of liquid ingredients!

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...user id=katra
  #94 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article >,
Serendipity > wrote:

> Katra wrote:
>
> <snip>
> >
> > <sigh> Sheldong, just because I've had trouble getting RICE right does
> > not mean I can't cook other stuff. ;-)
> >
> > I've posted a few recipes and I've never seen you flame them!
> >
> > Like everyone else here, I still have things to learn BUT AT LEAST I
> > ADMIT IT!!!
> >
> > And you are too chicken to try a pressure cooker. ;-)
> > They DO have their uses!

>
> Speaking of chicken and pressure cookers, I'm making homemade chicken
> noodle soup using the pressure cooker today. Contents in the pressure
> cooker will be onion, celery, carrot, chicken, seasonings, and water.
> Once pressure cooked, this will form a lovely broth and meat that falls
> from the bone. On the stovetop, this would take 3 - 4 hours; pressure
> cooking will achieve the same results in 45 min. The meat will be cut
> into bite size pieces and returned to the pot. The bones, celery, and
> carrot will be removed. From there, I will take it to homemade chicken
> noodle soup with additional liquid, maggi, chives, and broad noodles.
> I'm thinking a little white wine might be nice as part of the additional
> liquid. Finally, broad egg noodles will be added for a hearty,
> nutritious soup. I plan on serving the soup with homemade white bread.
> >

>


Sounds fantabulous... :-)
I've pressure cooked chicken to make soup, or better yet, chicken taco
meat! It falls from the bone in no time and can be easily shredded.

Two other items that _always_ get cooked in the pressure cooker are pigs
feet and chicken feet.......

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...user id=katra
  #95 (permalink)   Report Post  
Damsel in dis Dress
 
Posts: n/a
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Katra >, if that's their real name, wrote:

>In article >,
> Damsel in dis Dress > wrote:
>
>> Katra >, if that's their real name, wrote:
>>
>> >I put the rice into a stainless steel pot, the ones with the "self
>> >sealing" lids. I rinse the rice first in a colander then add it to the
>> >pot with 1 cup of rice to 2 cups of water or chicken broth. I turn it on
>> >to medium high with the lid off, and when it starts to simmer, I put the
>> >lid on and leave it on low. I was taught that that was supposed to
>> >"steam" it to perfection, but it just never seems to work somehow and
>> >nearly always also ends up scorching on the bottom of the pot!
>> >
>> >It must not be the right method, because it never works worth a damn.

>>
>> That's precisely how I make mine, with one exception. I use a 1:1 ratio of
>> water to rice. Picked that up in a Chinese cookbook. It lets you make
>> fried rice with freshly cooked rice.
>>
>> Carol

>
>Cool... but the consensus seems to be that I need to bring it up to a
>full boil, not just simmer!


Oops! I missed the critical word. I hope you'll have better luck now.

Carol
--
"Years ago my mother used to say to me... She'd say,
'In this world Elwood, you must be oh-so smart or oh-so pleasant.'
Well, for years I was smart.... I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."

*James Stewart* in the 1950 movie, _Harvey_


  #96 (permalink)   Report Post  
Sheldon
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Katra wrote:
> > >

> > http://www.carolinarice.com/carolinarice/faq/faq1.cfm
> >
> > Sheldon
> >

>
> <sigh> Sheldong, just because I've had trouble getting RICE right

does
> not mean I can't cook other stuff. ;-)


Hehe, you got one 'part' correct, Katrinka.

Shel'DONG' (and stop making untrue remarks that I won't help you - I'VE
NEVER EVER REFUSED ANYONE HELP HERE. - see Carolina Rice faq above,
posted previously)

  #97 (permalink)   Report Post  
zxcvbob
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Bubbabob wrote:
> zxcvbob > wrote:
>
>
>>Bubbabob wrote:
>>
>>>"Gregory Morrow"
>>><gregorymorrowEMERGENCYCANCELLATIONARCHIMEDES@e arthlink.net> wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>>I guess a pressure cooker would be okay for beef doing something like
>>>>the Cuban dish Ropa Vieja ("Old Clothes) or for bbq, but it's really
>>>>not necessary at least for me...
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>How could you possibly make BBQ in a pressure cooker? It requires a
>>>wood or charcoal fire and a cooking temperature of 225F.

>>
>>
>>
>>Notice that I never claimed to make bbq in a pressure cooker. But
>>what I have done several times is take a big tough gristly chuck roast
>>and pressure cook it on a rack. (The gristle turns to gelatin.) Save
>>the broth for another use. Carefully (so it doesn't fall apart)
>>transfer the meat to the smoke barrel and smoke it for a couple of
>>hours to dry it out a little and give it a smokey taste and color.
>>The end result doesn't have a bright red "smoke ring", and the bark is
>>too thin, but is otherwise almost indestiguishabled from real barbecue
>>that spent all night in 225 degree pit.
>>
>>Best regards,
>>Bob
>>

>
>
> But all of the flavor in that broth is lost from the meat. I can
> certainly tell the difference between meat prepared this way and meat
> that's properly BBQ'd.
>
> The smoke ring requires live nitrate-fixing bacteria working on the
> hemoglobin in the meat. Ring formation stops at 140F when these bacteria
> die. If you want a smoke ring and still want to do this terrible
> pressure-cooker thing to the meat, try smoking it first for an hour
> before it goes into the cooker.
>
> 'Drying' the meat in the smoker wouldn't work for me as I have a ceramic
> pit and you couldn't dry out a roast in it if you tried. I never even
> need to mop or baste. Rustbox cookers are another matter.



I knew you wouldn't approve, so I was careful not to actually call it
"barbecue". :-) I'd rather have a brisket that was properly smoked for
about 15 or 20 hours, but this is what I can do with the equipment I
have. My smoker doesn't get hot enough to really cook anything; I
built it to smoke bacon and sausages, or make beef jerky without cooking
it. Some day I should insulate it, and put in an electric heating
element and a thermostat...

Best regards,
Bob
  #98 (permalink)   Report Post  
zxcvbob
 
Posts: n/a
Default

zxcvbob wrote:

> Bubbabob wrote:
>
>> zxcvbob > wrote:
>>
>>
>>> Bubbabob wrote:
>>>
>>>> "Gregory Morrow"
>>>> <gregorymorrowEMERGENCYCANCELLATIONARCHIMEDES@eart hlink.net> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>> I guess a pressure cooker would be okay for beef doing something like
>>>>> the Cuban dish Ropa Vieja ("Old Clothes) or for bbq, but it's really
>>>>> not necessary at least for me...
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> How could you possibly make BBQ in a pressure cooker? It requires a
>>>> wood or charcoal fire and a cooking temperature of 225F.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Notice that I never claimed to make bbq in a pressure cooker. But
>>> what I have done several times is take a big tough gristly chuck roast
>>> and pressure cook it on a rack. (The gristle turns to gelatin.) Save
>>> the broth for another use. Carefully (so it doesn't fall apart)
>>> transfer the meat to the smoke barrel and smoke it for a couple of
>>> hours to dry it out a little and give it a smokey taste and color.
>>> The end result doesn't have a bright red "smoke ring", and the bark is
>>> too thin, but is otherwise almost indestiguishabled from real barbecue
>>> that spent all night in 225 degree pit.
>>>
>>> Best regards,
>>> Bob
>>>

>>
>>
>> But all of the flavor in that broth is lost from the meat. I can
>> certainly tell the difference between meat prepared this way and meat
>> that's properly BBQ'd.
>>
>> The smoke ring requires live nitrate-fixing bacteria working on the
>> hemoglobin in the meat. Ring formation stops at 140F when these
>> bacteria die. If you want a smoke ring and still want to do this
>> terrible pressure-cooker thing to the meat, try smoking it first for
>> an hour before it goes into the cooker.
>>
>> 'Drying' the meat in the smoker wouldn't work for me as I have a
>> ceramic pit and you couldn't dry out a roast in it if you tried. I
>> never even need to mop or baste. Rustbox cookers are another matter.

>
>
>
> I knew you wouldn't approve, so I was careful not to actually call it
> "barbecue". :-) I'd rather have a brisket that was properly smoked for
> about 15 or 20 hours, but this is what I can do with the equipment I
> have. My smoker doesn't get hot enough to really cook anything; I
> built it to smoke bacon and sausages, or make beef jerky without cooking
> it. Some day I should insulate it, and put in an electric heating
> element and a thermostat...
>
> Best regards,
> Bob



I forgot to mention, I bet the smoked PC'ed beef is closer to barbecue
than the abomination you were *expecting* to read about. I wonder what
Greg was referring to when he mentioned bbq'ing in a pressure cooker?

Bob
  #99 (permalink)   Report Post  
Gregory Morrow
 
Posts: n/a
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Bubbabob

> "Gregory Morrow"
> <gregorymorrowEMERGENCYCANCELLATIONARCHIMEDES@eart hlink.net> wrote:
>
> > I guess a pressure cooker would be okay for beef doing something like

the
> > Cuban dish Ropa Vieja ("Old Clothes) or for bbq, but it's really not
> > necessary at least for me...
> >

>
> How could you possibly make BBQ in a pressure cooker? It requires a wood

or
> charcoal fire and a cooking temperature of 225F.



I'm talkin' about fake "bbq"...say quickly rustlin' up a big mess of meat
for sammiches at a tavern feed or some such...

--
Best
Greg


  #100 (permalink)   Report Post  
Gregory Morrow
 
Posts: n/a
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Bubbabob wrote:

> zxcvbob > wrote:
>
> > Bubbabob wrote:
> >> "Gregory Morrow"
> >> <gregorymorrowEMERGENCYCANCELLATIONARCHIMEDES@eart hlink.net> wrote:
> >>
> >>
> >>>I guess a pressure cooker would be okay for beef doing something like
> >>>the Cuban dish Ropa Vieja ("Old Clothes) or for bbq, but it's really
> >>>not necessary at least for me...
> >>>
> >>
> >>
> >> How could you possibly make BBQ in a pressure cooker? It requires a
> >> wood or charcoal fire and a cooking temperature of 225F.

> >
> >
> >
> > Notice that I never claimed to make bbq in a pressure cooker. But
> > what I have done several times is take a big tough gristly chuck roast
> > and pressure cook it on a rack. (The gristle turns to gelatin.) Save
> > the broth for another use. Carefully (so it doesn't fall apart)
> > transfer the meat to the smoke barrel and smoke it for a couple of
> > hours to dry it out a little and give it a smokey taste and color.
> > The end result doesn't have a bright red "smoke ring", and the bark is
> > too thin, but is otherwise almost indestiguishabled from real barbecue
> > that spent all night in 225 degree pit.
> >
> > Best regards,
> > Bob
> >

>
> But all of the flavor in that broth is lost from the meat. I can
> certainly tell the difference between meat prepared this way and meat
> that's properly BBQ'd.
>
> The smoke ring requires live nitrate-fixing bacteria working on the
> hemoglobin in the meat. Ring formation stops at 140F when these bacteria
> die. If you want a smoke ring and still want to do this terrible
> pressure-cooker thing to the meat, try smoking it first for an hour
> before it goes into the cooker.
>
> 'Drying' the meat in the smoker wouldn't work for me as I have a ceramic
> pit and you couldn't dry out a roast in it if you tried. I never even
> need to mop or baste. Rustbox cookers are another matter.



Some of us live in apartments...no ready access to smokers and pits and such
like.

--
Best
Greg




  #101 (permalink)   Report Post  
Gregory Morrow
 
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zxcvbob wrote:

I wonder what
> Greg was referring to when he mentioned bbq'ing in a pressure cooker?
>



See my answer above...I've done it to quickly make a big bunch of meat for
events. Of course it's not authentic "bbq"...it's okay for sandwiches for a
crowd.

I mean I can hardly refer to it as "pressure - cooked meat", can I...???

Do you know that in Wisconsin they refer to *sloppy joes* as "bbq"? It's no
lie...

;-p

--
Best
Greg "lives in Illanoy..."



  #102 (permalink)   Report Post  
notbob
 
Posts: n/a
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On 2005-03-02, Gregory Morrow <gregorymorrowEMERGENCYCANCELLATIONARCHIMEDES@eart hlink.net> wrote:

> Do you know that in Wisconsin they refer to *sloppy joes* as "bbq"? It's no
> lie...


Yankees aren't the only one'd guilty of this. I lived in
Murphreesboro TN for a couple years way back when and the best "bbq"
for 3 counties was a local business that made it for all the
surrounding restarants and events. They made bbq pork and bbq beef
and it was basically the style where the meat is cooked to the death
in a bbq sauce and served up as a coarse, shredded, sloppy joe-like
concoction. Whether the meat was actually smoked/Q'd before immersion,
I can't say. I suspect not. Regardless, no one sniveled about it
being real bbq or questioned its authenticity, they just ate the Hell
out of it.

I heard the guy was in business for 40-50 years before he died and
took the sauce recipe to the grave. To this day, and despite the fact
I'm an avid true-Q'r (Bandera), I still love this non-authentic style.
There's a place here in the SFBA that makes a close approximation. I
hit it every chance I get.

nb
  #104 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article .com>,
"Sheldon" > wrote:

> Katra replies:
>
> >Gregory M. asks:
> >> Now I have to ask Katra up there if her "cooker" has ever

> "exploded"...has
> >> she ever found herself on top of the ceiling...heehee...

>
> >Never. Ever. :-)
> >Don't overfill it and that won't happen!
> >I've had a loss of pressure due to seals that needed to be replaced

> from
> >time to time, but that's it! No muss, no fuss!

>
> Lotsa older gals seem to share that problem... have you tried yoga?
> hehe
>


<rolls eyes>
You are SUCH a bad boy Sheldon! ;-)

Not sure if you'd know what to do with an older gal if you ever got hold
of one........ <snicker>

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


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  #105 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
Posts: n/a
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In article >,
Damsel in dis Dress > wrote:

> Katra >, if that's their real name, wrote:
>
> >In article >,
> > Damsel in dis Dress > wrote:
> >
> >> Katra >, if that's their real name, wrote:
> >>
> >> >I put the rice into a stainless steel pot, the ones with the "self
> >> >sealing" lids. I rinse the rice first in a colander then add it to the
> >> >pot with 1 cup of rice to 2 cups of water or chicken broth. I turn it on
> >> >to medium high with the lid off, and when it starts to simmer, I put the
> >> >lid on and leave it on low. I was taught that that was supposed to
> >> >"steam" it to perfection, but it just never seems to work somehow and
> >> >nearly always also ends up scorching on the bottom of the pot!
> >> >
> >> >It must not be the right method, because it never works worth a damn.
> >>
> >> That's precisely how I make mine, with one exception. I use a 1:1 ratio of
> >> water to rice. Picked that up in a Chinese cookbook. It lets you make
> >> fried rice with freshly cooked rice.
> >>
> >> Carol

> >
> >Cool... but the consensus seems to be that I need to bring it up to a
> >full boil, not just simmer!

>
> Oops! I missed the critical word. I hope you'll have better luck now.
>
> Carol


I plan to make rice this weekend, or maybe tomorrow morning. :-)

I'll report! I appreciate all the helpful posts offered after I
explained my little problem!

This is a great list!

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...user id=katra


  #106 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article om>,
"Sheldon" > wrote:

> Katra wrote:
> > > >
> > > http://www.carolinarice.com/carolinarice/faq/faq1.cfm
> > >
> > > Sheldon
> > >

> >
> > <sigh> Sheldong, just because I've had trouble getting RICE right

> does
> > not mean I can't cook other stuff. ;-)

>
> Hehe, you got one 'part' correct, Katrinka.
>
> Shel'DONG' (and stop making untrue remarks that I won't help you - I'VE
> NEVER EVER REFUSED ANYONE HELP HERE. - see Carolina Rice faq above,
> posted previously)
>


Okay, I apologize... <G> I did read that link and it pretty much said
what the other folks said, but I disagree with the part of that link
that said that pressure cooking is not recommended. Pressure cooking
rice works fine if you don't overcook it!

I'd just like to see you type out what YOU do instead of posting links!
That's too easy......... ;-D

Hugs?
Kat

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


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  #107 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
Posts: n/a
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In article >,
Bubbabob > wrote:

> Katra > wrote:
>
>
> > Sounds fantabulous... :-)
> > I've pressure cooked chicken to make soup, or better yet, chicken taco
> > meat! It falls from the bone in no time and can be easily shredded.
> >
> > Two other items that _always_ get cooked in the pressure cooker are
> > pigs feet and chicken feet.......
> >

>
> Good for tongue, too.


True, that, but tongue (lengua in my area!) was the only thing mom ever
blew a pressure cooker seal with! <lol> She stuffed in two of them,
overloading the cooker. One of the tongue tips curled up and blocked the
pressure outlet below the weight!

Wow what a mess!

> I can get pig tongues for $1.49/lb (compare that to


Oh my! Where? Beef lengua is never any lower than $7.00 per lb!
The best tongue I ever remember having is lambs tongue. I've never seen
pigs tongue. I'll have to go see if Fiesta carries it.

> the price these days for cow tongue, which used to be a cheap cut). I do
> them for about 45 min (35 at sea level) in a Chinese Red Cooking mixture of
> water, soy sauce, cinnamon sticks, star anise, black peppercorns,
> coriander, and dried red chiles. They taste EXACTLY like cow tongue done
> the same way. Great sandwich meat.


Indeed!

I have a lot of fond memories of tongue back when it was cheap.
It's a treat now! <sigh>

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


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  #108 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article > ,
Bubbabob > wrote:

> Katra > wrote:
>
>
> >
> > True, that, but tongue (lengua in my area!) was the only thing mom
> > ever blew a pressure cooker seal with! <lol> She stuffed in two of
> > them, overloading the cooker. One of the tongue tips curled up and
> > blocked the pressure outlet below the weight!
> >
> > Wow what a mess!
> >
> >> I can get pig tongues for $1.49/lb (compare that to

> >
> > Oh my! Where? Beef lengua is never any lower than $7.00 per lb!
> > The best tongue I ever remember having is lambs tongue. I've never
> > seen pigs tongue. I'll have to go see if Fiesta carries it.
> >
> >> the price these days for cow tongue, which used to be a cheap cut). I
> >> do them for about 45 min (35 at sea level) in a Chinese Red Cooking
> >> mixture of water, soy sauce, cinnamon sticks, star anise, black
> >> peppercorns, coriander, and dried red chiles. They taste EXACTLY like
> >> cow tongue done the same way. Great sandwich meat.

> >
> > Indeed!
> >
> > I have a lot of fond memories of tongue back when it was cheap.
> > It's a treat now! <sigh>
> >

>
> Pig tongues are a lot smaller. I can put 7 or 8 in at once (7 liter
> cooker). I get them at the local 99 Banh Supermarket. I think most
> Vietnamese markets that have a decent meat counter should have them.


Ah! Probably...

I've not tried the Asian market in Austin for tongue.
They carry a lot of pork, including whole pork legs that they will cut
up for you. I can get just the whole trotters there as well if that is
what I want, but pork hocks are wonderful as well. I just HATE the way
most stores cut trotters in half down the middle, and I won't buy them
that way! Darn bone splinters. :-P I look for them whole whenever I can.

I'll check My Thanh for pig tongues then, thanks!

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


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  #110 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article >,
Wayne Boatwright > wrote:

> On Wed 02 Mar 2005 11:38:04p, Katra wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>
> > In article >,
> > Hahabogus > wrote:
> >
> >> Katra > wrote in news:KatraMungBean-
> >> :
> >>
> >> > Microwaving always works well... I just need to get a deeper pyrex or
> >> > corningware! Mine tends to boil over.
> >> >
> >> > I prefer to always use chicken or beef broth in place of water, or a
> >> > bullion cube in the water prior to adding it to the rice.
> >> >
> >> > --
> >> >
> >>
> >>
> >> I used a fairly shallow pyrex dish...but it was broad. This seemed to
> >> reduce boil overs.
> >>
> >> After my small rice cooker purchase I'd cook my 1 cup of rice in a can
> >> of cream of chicken soup and enough water to make 2 cups. And maybe
> >> stir in a handfull of frozen peas just before serving.

> >
> > Gods that sounds good!!!
> > I'd also probably add a little chopped cooked chicken or turkey....
> >

>
> I make the same thing and arrange chicken tenders over the top, but I bake
> it in the oven. Never thought of using the microwave for it. It really is
> tasty and a quick simple meal. Sometimes I add curry powder to the mix.


Mmmm curry....
Thanks for reminding me of that!
I've not cooked with curry for awhile and I have plenty in the spice
cabinet, plus a live "curry" plant out in the herb garden.

Now I realize that curry is actually a mixture of spices including
turmeric and chiles, this "curry" plant I think is related to rosemary,
or at least the growth pattern is the same.

The bruised leaves smell just like curry and add a nice light flavor to
the meat that I put it on. It's not growing very well so I can't harvest
a lot at a time, but it's nice!

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


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  #111 (permalink)   Report Post  
Sheldon
 
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Katra writes:
I'd just like to see you type out what YOU do instead of posting links!

That's too easy......... ;-D

I don't understand the difficulty in cooking rice, the vast majority of
the world population cooks rice every day with no problems (and the
vast majority of those have no formal education whatsoever), nothing is
easier to cook than rice.

First, toss that friggin' worthless pressure cukoo in the trash bin...
that fercocktah piece of crap is your biggest problem.

Next figure out how much rice you want to cook... VERY important... you
need to properly size the pot to the amount cooked (which is yet
another reason your rice sucks, cukoo pot is probably way too large for
a cup or two) .... I like about two quarts of pot for every cup of
rice... when rice has fully cooked it should fill about 2/3 of the pot,
with about 1/3 of the pot empty (proper head room for steam is VERY
important). So choose an appropriately sized sturdy pot with a well
fitting lid... for cooking 1 - 1-1/2 cups of rice (the quantity I most
usually prepare) I happen to like an old 2 quart Farberware... you
don't need a $149.00 designer pot to cook 23=A2 worth of rice.

Next you need to know your stove, you need a burner that produces a
true low simmer, not a low boil... the small burner on my gas stove at
its lowest setting produces a true low simmer with up to 3 quarts of
water, more water than that and I need to crank the heat up a bit to
keep the water so that there are only *occasional tiny bubbles*... test
your stove burners with plain water... doesn't everyone?

Next you need to know your rice... that's a vast subject unto itself,
aside from cooking... so lets talk just the typical enriched long grain
white rice as is commonly sold in US stupidmarkets. Enriched rice
should not be washed, white rice is nutritionless enough, why wash the
few added nutrients down the drain... US rice is clean, never needs
washing... not so for any and all imported rice.

So now let's cook... measure out your rice - no vernier caliper
necessary - rice is as low as one can go in the human food chain,
nothing about cooking it requires more precision than your eyeball,
when you're high. I typically fill a pyrex 1cup measure to half way
between the 1 cup mark and the top rim of the cup, eyeball is plenty
good enough. I usually add a bit of butter but not always... your
choice... with butter melt that first (low heat) and then add the rice,
stir. Now you have another momentous fork in the road, to pour in the
2 cups water cold and heat with the rice, or preheat the water. If I'm
going to add saffron then I add that to the water and preheat in the
nuker (extracts more saffron flavor), cover 2 cup Pyrex measure with
saucer and nuke, about 8 minutes in my nuker. For plain rice I add the
cold water to the rice and let it just sit for about 1/2 hour, then
begin to cook.

Add heated saffron water to buttered rice, add a big pinch of salt if
you like, turn up heat to bring back to the boil, stir, cover, turn
down heat to low simmer. Set timer for 13 minutes. When timer goes
off turn off heat... do NOT lift lid... leave covered pot sit for at
least five minutes and up to a half hour... I usually wait 15 minutes
before lifting lid to fluff perfectly cooked rice, 15 minutes is how
long it takes to fry 3 thick pork chops.

And there you have it, *basic* rice, PERFECTLY cooked.

Of course I have at least two million (2,000,000) rice tricks and
variations thereof.

Sheldon

  #112 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
Posts: n/a
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Thanks Sheldon! ;-)

I've saved it with the others to the nutrition folder...
It appears that my problem with past attempts at stovetop rice was that
I never brought it to a boil. Just a simmer which was not initially hot
enough.

Now, what is YOUR timing for brown rice cooked in chicken broth rather
than water? One poster said to cook for twice as long as white rice
which sounded about right.

I have some saffron up in the cabinet and have never used it. I'll have
to give that a try. Does it really add flavor and not just color???

Kat

In article . com>,
"Sheldon" > wrote:

> I don't understand the difficulty in cooking rice, the vast majority of
> the world population cooks rice every day with no problems (and the
> vast majority of those have no formal education whatsoever), nothing is
> easier to cook than rice.
>
> First, toss that friggin' worthless pressure cukoo in the trash bin...
> that fercocktah piece of crap is your biggest problem.
>
> Next figure out how much rice you want to cook... VERY important... you
> need to properly size the pot to the amount cooked (which is yet
> another reason your rice sucks, cukoo pot is probably way too large for
> a cup or two) .... I like about two quarts of pot for every cup of
> rice... when rice has fully cooked it should fill about 2/3 of the pot,
> with about 1/3 of the pot empty (proper head room for steam is VERY
> important). So choose an appropriately sized sturdy pot with a well
> fitting lid... for cooking 1 - 1-1/2 cups of rice (the quantity I most
> usually prepare) I happen to like an old 2 quart Farberware... you
> don't need a $149.00 designer pot to cook 23 worth of rice.
>
> Next you need to know your stove, you need a burner that produces a
> true low simmer, not a low boil... the small burner on my gas stove at
> its lowest setting produces a true low simmer with up to 3 quarts of
> water, more water than that and I need to crank the heat up a bit to
> keep the water so that there are only *occasional tiny bubbles*... test
> your stove burners with plain water... doesn't everyone?
>
> Next you need to know your rice... that's a vast subject unto itself,
> aside from cooking... so lets talk just the typical enriched long grain
> white rice as is commonly sold in US stupidmarkets. Enriched rice
> should not be washed, white rice is nutritionless enough, why wash the
> few added nutrients down the drain... US rice is clean, never needs
> washing... not so for any and all imported rice.
>
> So now let's cook... measure out your rice - no vernier caliper
> necessary - rice is as low as one can go in the human food chain,
> nothing about cooking it requires more precision than your eyeball,
> when you're high. I typically fill a pyrex 1cup measure to half way
> between the 1 cup mark and the top rim of the cup, eyeball is plenty
> good enough. I usually add a bit of butter but not always... your
> choice... with butter melt that first (low heat) and then add the rice,
> stir. Now you have another momentous fork in the road, to pour in the
> 2 cups water cold and heat with the rice, or preheat the water. If I'm
> going to add saffron then I add that to the water and preheat in the
> nuker (extracts more saffron flavor), cover 2 cup Pyrex measure with
> saucer and nuke, about 8 minutes in my nuker. For plain rice I add the
> cold water to the rice and let it just sit for about 1/2 hour, then
> begin to cook.
>
> Add heated saffron water to buttered rice, add a big pinch of salt if
> you like, turn up heat to bring back to the boil, stir, cover, turn
> down heat to low simmer. Set timer for 13 minutes. When timer goes
> off turn off heat... do NOT lift lid... leave covered pot sit for at
> least five minutes and up to a half hour... I usually wait 15 minutes
> before lifting lid to fluff perfectly cooked rice, 15 minutes is how
> long it takes to fry 3 thick pork chops.
>
> And there you have it, *basic* rice, PERFECTLY cooked.
>
> Of course I have at least two million (2,000,000) rice tricks and
> variations thereof.
>
> Sheldon
>


--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


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  #113 (permalink)   Report Post  
Rodney Myrvaagnes
 
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On Thu, 03 Mar 2005 14:10:59 -0600, Katra
> wrote:

>Thanks Sheldon! ;-)
>
>I've saved it with the others to the nutrition folder...
>It appears that my problem with past attempts at stovetop rice was that
>I never brought it to a boil. Just a simmer which was not initially hot
>enough.
>
>Now, what is YOUR timing for brown rice cooked in chicken broth rather
>than water? One poster said to cook for twice as long as white rice
>which sounded about right.
>
>I have some saffron up in the cabinet and have never used it. I'll have
>to give that a try. Does it really add flavor and not just color???
>
>Kat

I cooked some brown basmati rice a couple of days ago according to the
directions on the bag. It was 2:1 water to rice after rinsing the
rice, same as white rice, but after coming to a boil simmer for 50
minutes covered, and let sit 10 minutes, still covered, after turning
the heat off. Then fluff with fork.

It worked fine. I gritted my teeth to try it because I thought it
would dry out. After all, the cover is just that. It isn't a pressure
cooker. But it wasn't dried.



Rodney Myrvaagnes NYC J36 Gjo/a


Capsizing under chute, and having the chute rise and fill without tangling, all while Mark and Sally are still behind you
  #114 (permalink)   Report Post  
Sheldon
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Katra wrote:
> Thanks Sheldon! ;-)
>
> I've saved it with the others to the nutrition folder...
> It appears that my problem with past attempts at stovetop rice was

that
> I never brought it to a boil. Just a simmer which was not initially

hot
> enough.
>
> Now, what is YOUR timing for brown rice cooked in chicken broth

rather
> than water? One poster said to cook for twice as long as white rice
> which sounded about right.
>
> I have some saffron up in the cabinet and have never used it. I'll

have
> to give that a try. Does it really add flavor and not just color???


I'm not a big fan of brown rice but occasionally (like every 5 yrs) I
will give it another shot, brown rice (gack) always fails. If I'm
going to bother cooking rice for nigh onto an hour I much prefer wild
rice (I know it's not really rice but it's goooood).

For basic brown rice use the same system I presented for basic white
rice, only cook it about three times longer.

I don't think saffron would go well with brown rice, not wild rice
either... but taste is subjective. If your saffron is good quality
threads (not ground), it should keep virtually forever, and yes,
saffron imparts not only a gorgeous deep daffodil yellow color but also
the flavor of the goddesses... about twenty threads per cup of white
rice. Just so happened that Monday night I prepared saffron rice with
basmati... basmati is a whole nother book.

Sheldon

  #115 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
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Default

In article >,
Rodney Myrvaagnes > wrote:

> On Thu, 03 Mar 2005 14:10:59 -0600, Katra
> > wrote:
>
> >Thanks Sheldon! ;-)
> >
> >I've saved it with the others to the nutrition folder...
> >It appears that my problem with past attempts at stovetop rice was that
> >I never brought it to a boil. Just a simmer which was not initially hot
> >enough.
> >
> >Now, what is YOUR timing for brown rice cooked in chicken broth rather
> >than water? One poster said to cook for twice as long as white rice
> >which sounded about right.
> >
> >I have some saffron up in the cabinet and have never used it. I'll have
> >to give that a try. Does it really add flavor and not just color???
> >
> >Kat

> I cooked some brown basmati rice a couple of days ago according to the
> directions on the bag. It was 2:1 water to rice after rinsing the
> rice, same as white rice, but after coming to a boil simmer for 50
> minutes covered, and let sit 10 minutes, still covered, after turning
> the heat off. Then fluff with fork.
>
> It worked fine. I gritted my teeth to try it because I thought it
> would dry out. After all, the cover is just that. It isn't a pressure
> cooker. But it wasn't dried.
>
>
>
> Rodney Myrvaagnes


So Basmati rice takes longer to cook?
--
K.


  #116 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article .com>,
"Sheldon" > wrote:

> Katra wrote:
> > Thanks Sheldon! ;-)
> >
> > I've saved it with the others to the nutrition folder...
> > It appears that my problem with past attempts at stovetop rice was

> that
> > I never brought it to a boil. Just a simmer which was not initially

> hot
> > enough.
> >
> > Now, what is YOUR timing for brown rice cooked in chicken broth

> rather
> > than water? One poster said to cook for twice as long as white rice
> > which sounded about right.
> >
> > I have some saffron up in the cabinet and have never used it. I'll

> have
> > to give that a try. Does it really add flavor and not just color???

>
> I'm not a big fan of brown rice but occasionally (like every 5 yrs) I
> will give it another shot, brown rice (gack) always fails.


If brown rice always fails for you, you could try a pressure cooker!
<lol> That always works for me, and with chicken broth!
Think this is where I came in........ ;-D

My father refuses to eat white rice due to nutritional considerations.
I don't cook much for myself, I cook more for him.

> If I'm
> going to bother cooking rice for nigh onto an hour I much prefer wild
> rice (I know it's not really rice but it's goooood).


On THAT I will agree!!! Central Market carries a wild rice mix with
about 4 different varieties in it and it's fantastic. When I DO cook
white rice, I always add wild black rice to it for a neat color
contrast. Goes well with brown rice too.

>
> For basic brown rice use the same system I presented for basic white
> rice, only cook it about three times longer.


Ok.

Or I could just keep doing what I've been doing and pressure cook it
since that works 100% of them time. <snicker>

But honestly, I need to give stove top rice a try just so I can prove to
myself that I can do it. It's a matter of culinary pride now!

>
> I don't think saffron would go well with brown rice, not wild rice
> either... but taste is subjective. If your saffron is good quality
> threads (not ground), it should keep virtually forever, and yes,
> saffron imparts not only a gorgeous deep daffodil yellow color but also
> the flavor of the goddesses... about twenty threads per cup of white
> rice. Just so happened that Monday night I prepared saffron rice with
> basmati... basmati is a whole nother book.


And??? They sell a LOT of Basmati rice in this area, but there is an
Asian market in Austin that sells a HUGE variety of all different kinds
of rice, and in 25 lb. cloth bags no less!

I do love rice! And I'm so sick of low carb I can hardly stand it, but
it is working. Once I can get this weight off, I look forward to
re-adding more rice back to my diet.

27 lbs. down, 96 to go. <sigh>

>
> Sheldon
>


--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


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  #117 (permalink)   Report Post  
zxcvbob
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Katra wrote:
> In article >,
> Rodney Myrvaagnes > wrote:
>
>
>>On Thu, 03 Mar 2005 14:10:59 -0600, Katra
> wrote:
>>
>>
>>>Thanks Sheldon! ;-)
>>>
>>>I've saved it with the others to the nutrition folder...
>>>It appears that my problem with past attempts at stovetop rice was that
>>>I never brought it to a boil. Just a simmer which was not initially hot
>>>enough.
>>>
>>>Now, what is YOUR timing for brown rice cooked in chicken broth rather
>>>than water? One poster said to cook for twice as long as white rice
>>>which sounded about right.
>>>
>>>I have some saffron up in the cabinet and have never used it. I'll have
>>>to give that a try. Does it really add flavor and not just color???
>>>
>>>Kat

>>
>>I cooked some brown basmati rice a couple of days ago according to the
>>directions on the bag. It was 2:1 water to rice after rinsing the
>>rice, same as white rice, but after coming to a boil simmer for 50
>>minutes covered, and let sit 10 minutes, still covered, after turning
>>the heat off. Then fluff with fork.
>>
>>It worked fine. I gritted my teeth to try it because I thought it
>>would dry out. After all, the cover is just that. It isn't a pressure
>>cooker. But it wasn't dried.
>>
>>
>>
>>Rodney Myrvaagnes

>
>
> So Basmati rice takes longer to cook?



Basmati rice cooks just like any other long-grain rice. Fifteen to 20
minutes for white basmati, and 45 minutes for brown unless you soak it
first. If you soak it first, it cooks faster, but I don't know how much
faster.

Best regards,
Bob
  #118 (permalink)   Report Post  
Sherry
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"zxcvbob" > wrote in message
>
>
> Basmati rice cooks just like any other long-grain rice. Fifteen to 20
> minutes for white basmati, and 45 minutes for brown unless you soak it
> first. If you soak it first, it cooks faster, but I don't know how much
> faster.
>
> Best regards,
> Bob


Many years ago while watching The Frugal Gourmet "The Frug" said, well it
was more of a plea actually, that white Basmati rice should never be cooked
more than 10 minutes. I never cook it more than 10 minutes and it comes out
perfect every time.


  #119 (permalink)   Report Post  
Rodney Myrvaagnes
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Fri, 04 Mar 2005 00:36:29 -0600, Katra
> wrote:

>In article >,
> Rodney Myrvaagnes > wrote:
>
>> On Thu, 03 Mar 2005 14:10:59 -0600, Katra
>> > wrote:
>>
>> >Thanks Sheldon! ;-)
>> >
>> >I've saved it with the others to the nutrition folder...
>> >It appears that my problem with past attempts at stovetop rice was that
>> >I never brought it to a boil. Just a simmer which was not initially hot
>> >enough.
>> >
>> >Now, what is YOUR timing for brown rice cooked in chicken broth rather
>> >than water? One poster said to cook for twice as long as white rice
>> >which sounded about right.
>> >
>> >I have some saffron up in the cabinet and have never used it. I'll have
>> >to give that a try. Does it really add flavor and not just color???
>> >
>> >Kat

>> I cooked some brown basmati rice a couple of days ago according to the
>> directions on the bag. It was 2:1 water to rice after rinsing the
>> rice, same as white rice, but after coming to a boil simmer for 50
>> minutes covered, and let sit 10 minutes, still covered, after turning
>> the heat off. Then fluff with fork.
>>
>> It worked fine. I gritted my teeth to try it because I thought it
>> would dry out. After all, the cover is just that. It isn't a pressure
>> cooker. But it wasn't dried.
>>
>>
>>
>> Rodney Myrvaagnes

>
>So Basmati rice takes longer to cook?


It sure does. I don't know why. I also haven't used a lot of different
brown rices, but I seriously doubt that all of them need that kind of
time.



Rodney Myrvaagnes NYC J36 Gjo/a


"Be careful. The toe you stepped on yesterday may be connected to the ass you have to kiss today." --Former mayor Ciancia
  #120 (permalink)   Report Post  
Lena B Katz
 
Posts: n/a
Default



On Fri, 4 Mar 2005, Rodney Myrvaagnes wrote:

> On Fri, 04 Mar 2005 00:36:29 -0600, Katra
> > wrote:
>
>> In article >,
>> Rodney Myrvaagnes > wrote:
>>
>>> On Thu, 03 Mar 2005 14:10:59 -0600, Katra
>>> > wrote:
>>>
>>>> Thanks Sheldon! ;-)
>>>>
>>>> I've saved it with the others to the nutrition folder...
>>>> It appears that my problem with past attempts at stovetop rice was that
>>>> I never brought it to a boil. Just a simmer which was not initially hot
>>>> enough.
>>>>
>>>> Now, what is YOUR timing for brown rice cooked in chicken broth rather
>>>> than water? One poster said to cook for twice as long as white rice
>>>> which sounded about right.
>>>>
>>>> I have some saffron up in the cabinet and have never used it. I'll have
>>>> to give that a try. Does it really add flavor and not just color???
>>>>
>>>> Kat
>>> I cooked some brown basmati rice a couple of days ago according to the
>>> directions on the bag. It was 2:1 water to rice after rinsing the
>>> rice, same as white rice, but after coming to a boil simmer for 50
>>> minutes covered, and let sit 10 minutes, still covered, after turning
>>> the heat off. Then fluff with fork.
>>>
>>> It worked fine. I gritted my teeth to try it because I thought it
>>> would dry out. After all, the cover is just that. It isn't a pressure
>>> cooker. But it wasn't dried.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Rodney Myrvaagnes

>>
>> So Basmati rice takes longer to cook?

>
> It sure does. I don't know why. I also haven't used a lot of different
> brown rices, but I seriously doubt that all of them need that kind of
> time.


I think most brown rice takes double the time of regular to cook.
(different species).

Oh, well, the point is moot.

Why must health food nuts conclude that because something is white, that
it is bleached?

Brown rice is inherently inferior, and most families in India would be
ashamed to put it on the table.

lena
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