General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 17-07-2010, 06:46 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 173
Default Half moon pie vs. turnover - what's the difference?

Aside from the half moon pie being an Amish pastry, I believe.

Lenona.

  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 17-07-2010, 07:46 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 12,124
Default Half moon pie vs. turnover - what's the difference?

In article
,
Lenona wrote:

Aside from the half moon pie being an Amish pastry, I believe.

Lenona.


AFAIK, turnovers are made with puff pastry and are triangular in shape.


--
Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
Holy Order of the Sacred Sisters of
St. Pectina of Jella
"Always in a jam, never in a stew;
sometimes in a pickle."
Where are my pearls, Honey?
  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 18-07-2010, 09:57 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 7,133
Default Half moon pie vs. turnover - what's the difference?



"Sqwertz" wrote in message
...
On Sat, 17 Jul 2010 10:46:41 -0700 (PDT), Lenona wrote:

Aside from the half moon pie being an Amish pastry, I believe.

Lenona.


A turnover is made with a layered dough, an Amish pie with a
larded pie dough.


Never heard of an Amish pie. Do you have a recipe for it, Steve?

--
--
https://www.shop.helpforheroes.org.uk/

  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 18-07-2010, 04:20 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 1,254
Default Half moon pie vs. turnover - what's the difference?

On Jul 17, 1:46*pm, Lenona wrote:
Aside from the half moon pie being an Amish pastry, I believe.


Lenona...very good article in Fine Cooking this month.

http://www.finecooking.com/recipes/s...each-pies.aspx


Had a nice twist with pepper jelly and cayenne....
  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 18-07-2010, 05:11 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 7,133
Default Half moon pie vs. turnover - what's the difference?



"Sqwertz" wrote in message
news
On Sun, 18 Jul 2010 09:57:39 +0100, Ophelia wrote:

"Sqwertz" wrote in message
...
On Sat, 17 Jul 2010 10:46:41 -0700 (PDT), Lenona wrote:

Aside from the half moon pie being an Amish pastry, I believe.

Lenona.

A turnover is made with a layered dough, an Amish pie with a
larded pie dough.


Never heard of an Amish pie. Do you have a recipe for it, Steve?


It's your typical Hostess/Home Run pies.


Hey! I am in Scotland! I have no idea what the 'home run's' pies are!


I know the Home Run's
used to be $3/1.00 but it's been forever since I've priced them.
And it's been about as long since I've seen them marketed as Amish
pies, but they're the same trashy crescent-shaped, glazed personal
pies they sell at the Quickie Mart. Not worth duplicating.

-sw


--
--
https://www.shop.helpforheroes.org.uk/



  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 18-07-2010, 05:18 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 3,651
Default Half moon pie vs. turnover - what's the difference?

Ophelia wrote:
"Sqwertz" wrote


It's your typical Hostess/Home Run pies.


Hey! I am in Scotland! I have no idea what the 'home run's' pies
are!


I'm not in Scotland and I never heard of them. However, Hostess
pies are the fried kind you hold in your hand rather than eat with
a fork. It's completely encased in crust/dough/whatever.

nancy
  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 18-07-2010, 06:11 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 7,133
Default Half moon pie vs. turnover - what's the difference?



"Nancy Young" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
Ophelia wrote:
"Sqwertz" wrote


It's your typical Hostess/Home Run pies.


Hey! I am in Scotland! I have no idea what the 'home run's' pies
are!


I'm not in Scotland and I never heard of them. However, Hostess
pies are the fried kind you hold in your hand rather than eat with
a fork. It's completely encased in crust/dough/whatever.


I 've never had one of those.

--
--
https://www.shop.helpforheroes.org.uk/

  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 18-07-2010, 08:16 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 7,133
Default Half moon pie vs. turnover - what's the difference?



"Wayne Boatwright" wrote in message
5.247...
On Sun 18 Jul 2010 09:11:30a, Ophelia told us...



"Sqwertz" wrote in message
news
On Sun, 18 Jul 2010 09:57:39 +0100, Ophelia wrote:

"Sqwertz" wrote in message
...
On Sat, 17 Jul 2010 10:46:41 -0700 (PDT), Lenona wrote:

Aside from the half moon pie being an Amish pastry, I believe.

Lenona.

A turnover is made with a layered dough, an Amish pie with a
larded pie dough.

Never heard of an Amish pie. Do you have a recipe for it,
Steve?

It's your typical Hostess/Home Run pies.


Hey! I am in Scotland! I have no idea what the 'home run's' pies
are!


Ophelia,

You could almost equate this sort of pie to a sweet version of a
Cornish Pastie, yet there are many variations here in the US. By
far, the fillings are generally fruit, typically apple, cherry,
peach. Although, commercially, you will also find some cream pie
fillings, particularly chocolate, and I've also seen pineapple.

I've personally never heard of a Home Run pie. Perhaps it's a
regional brand. Hostess is a national brand of baked goods that
include the semi-circle shaped pies, cupcakes with a bit of cream
filling squirted inside and iced on top, and assorted other
"goodies". Personally, I find most of their products sub-par and
barely edible, but as I said, that's just my own opinion.

http://www.hostesscakes.com/products.asp


Ok so it is a sweet trash type cake?


As to "Amish" pies, when I lived in Ohio I lived only about 45 miles
from an area known as "Amish Country". Heavy populations of the
Amish are found in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Indiana. There may be
other areas I'm unaware of. However, I digress. In Ohio Amish
Country, We frequented their restaurants and stores and I never saw
anything officially labeled an "Amish Pie". The Amish are well known
for their baking, including really delicious traditional pies made
with shortcrust pastry and a sweet filling. The fillings they choose
are almost endless, including almost any fruit one could think of, as
well as a wide variety of cream pies that include banana cream,
chocolate cream, coconut cream, egg custard, etc. In their bakeries
you do see the semi-circle shaped pies for sale, but without a a
label such as "Amish".

As to these semi-circle shaped pies in general, they fall into two
categories, either baked or fried. In the southern US these pies are
usually fried. The fillings are often made from stewed dried fruit
such as apple, peach, or apricot. When my mother made them, she made
a dough using either lard or vegetable shortening. The dried fruit
was soaked, then stewed with a small amount of water and sweeted to
taste with sugar. The fruit was finally mashed slightly, then
cooled. The pastry was rolled out about 1/8" thick and cut in
circles using a small plate 6-7" in diameter as a pattern. Filling
was placed on one half of the circle, the other half folded over and
the edges crimped either with fingers or with a fork. The pies were
then fried in either lard or vegetable shortening until golden brown,
then turned and the second side fried. They were placed on paper
towel laid on a cooling rack. They were often served still warm, but
were also good cold. Sometimes sprinkled with powedered sugar. The
same instructions could be followed for a baked version except for
the cooking method. In that case you would bake them at ~375 degrees
F. until golden brown.

Turnovers differ in that the pastry is usually puff pastry or rough
puff pastry, and they are always baked. The filling is almost always
fruit.


So? All sweet stuff as well? Thanks, Wayne!
--
https://www.shop.helpforheroes.org.uk/
  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 18-07-2010, 10:29 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 61,789
Default Half moon pie vs. turnover - what's the difference?

On Sun, 18 Jul 2010 20:16:47 +0100, "Ophelia"
wrote:

http://www.hostesscakes.com/products.asp


Ok so it is a sweet trash type cake?


Trash? Ha! Perish the thought! It was my favorite Hostess product
when I was a kid and it fits my current eating criteria. See sig
line.
--

Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.
  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-07-2010, 12:13 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 4,178
Default Half moon pie vs. turnover - what's the difference?



Ophelia wrote:

"Sqwertz" wrote in message
news
On Sun, 18 Jul 2010 09:57:39 +0100, Ophelia wrote:

"Sqwertz" wrote in message
...
On Sat, 17 Jul 2010 10:46:41 -0700 (PDT), Lenona wrote:

Aside from the half moon pie being an Amish pastry, I believe.

Lenona.

A turnover is made with a layered dough, an Amish pie with a
larded pie dough.

Never heard of an Amish pie. Do you have a recipe for it, Steve?


It's your typical Hostess/Home Run pies.


Hey! I am in Scotland! I have no idea what the 'home run's' pies are!


snip


Think of the worst sort of 'Mr Kipling's' pies if you get those up
North. Firm crust, not easily breakable or digestible


  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 20-07-2010, 02:59 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 301
Default Half moon pie vs. turnover - what's the difference?

Ophelia wrote:
"Sqwertz" wrote in message
...
On Sat, 17 Jul 2010 10:46:41 -0700 (PDT), Lenona wrote:

Aside from the half moon pie being an Amish pastry, I believe.

Lenona.


A turnover is made with a layered dough, an Amish pie with a
larded pie dough.


Never heard of an Amish pie. Do you have a recipe for it, Steve?


Nothing Amish is worth recreating.


  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 20-07-2010, 08:31 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 61,789
Default Half moon pie vs. turnover - what's the difference?

On Mon, 19 Jul 2010 21:59:05 -0400, "dejablues"
wrote:

nothing Amish is worth recreating.

Nothing????

--

Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.
  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 20-07-2010, 12:43 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 3,651
Default Half moon pie vs. turnover - what's the difference?

sf wrote:
On Mon, 19 Jul 2010 21:59:05 -0400, "dejablues"
wrote:

nothing Amish is worth recreating.

Nothing????


They make these crazy good sticky buns in PA.

nancy
  #14 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 20-07-2010, 03:28 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 7,133
Default Half moon pie vs. turnover - what's the difference?



"dejablues" wrote in message
...
Ophelia wrote:
"Sqwertz" wrote in message
...
On Sat, 17 Jul 2010 10:46:41 -0700 (PDT), Lenona wrote:

Aside from the half moon pie being an Amish pastry, I believe.

Lenona.

A turnover is made with a layered dough, an Amish pie with a
larded pie dough.


Never heard of an Amish pie. Do you have a recipe for it, Steve?


Nothing Amish is worth recreating.


Is that just your opinion or a general one?


--
--
https://www.shop.helpforheroes.org.uk/

  #15 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 20-07-2010, 04:16 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 7,133
Default Half moon pie vs. turnover - what's the difference?



"Wayne Boatwright" wrote in message
5.247...
On Tue 20 Jul 2010 07:28:06a, Ophelia told us...



"dejablues" wrote in message
...
Ophelia wrote:
"Sqwertz" wrote in message
...
On Sat, 17 Jul 2010 10:46:41 -0700 (PDT), Lenona wrote:

Aside from the half moon pie being an Amish pastry, I believe.

Lenona.

A turnover is made with a layered dough, an Amish pie with a
larded pie dough.

Never heard of an Amish pie. Do you have a recipe for it,
Steve?

Nothing Amish is worth recreating.


Is that just your opinion or a general one?



It is just that poster's warped opinion. The Amish create some
delicious food. Most of their food is very simple fair, but very
homey and tasty.


Ahh, then it is most interesting to me

--
--
https://www.shop.helpforheroes.org.uk/



Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Replacing Heavy Cream with Half and Half Steve Freides[_2_] General Cooking 23 20-08-2012 07:34 PM
promote table-turnover at a restaurant? [email protected] Restaurants 3 05-04-2007 04:42 AM
Fudge recipe: cream vs. half-and-half Scott General Cooking 5 14-05-2005 01:55 AM
Freezing heavy cream and half-and-half Scott General Cooking 12 16-07-2004 09:09 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 08:57 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2022 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"

 

Copyright © 2017