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Old 09-06-2010, 11:11 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default To knead or not to knead: the great bread debate

On Wed, 9 Jun 2010 14:48:39 -0700 (PDT), ImStillMags
wrote:


The no knead method I use works really well. I have my own sourdough
starter and I use it in a no knead methodology and I get wonderful
results.


These were the current fad, not sourdough starter.

What happened when you tried those methods? What didn't work for you?


Basically they were too "heavy" when fully cooked. They looked and
acted great until eating time. Did the knock test, sounded good but
it wasn't. baked one batch using the covered dutch oven method and
the other batch directly on tile. Neither one was a do over AFAIWC.

--
Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.

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Old 09-06-2010, 11:23 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default To knead or not to knead: the great bread debate

On Jun 9, 3:11*pm, sf wrote:
On Wed, 9 Jun 2010 14:48:39 -0700 (PDT), ImStillMags

wrote:

The no knead method I use works really well. *I have my own sourdough
starter and I use it in a no knead methodology and I get wonderful
results.


These were the current fad, not sourdough starter.



What happened when you tried those methods? *What didn't work for you?


Basically they were too "heavy" when fully cooked. *They looked and
acted great until eating time. *Did the knock test, sounded good but
it wasn't. *baked one batch using the covered dutch oven method and
the other batch directly on tile. *Neither one was a do over AFAIWC.

--
Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.


When you say 'heavy' was the texture gummy or sticky or wet?

I've experimented with the no knead a lot and I've found that the
lightest and best interior took a longer rising time
than what the original recipe called for. The no knead recipe
Bittman used called for 4 hours, usually I let mine sit
for about 6 and it is much better. But it may be because I use
sourdough starter ...

The covered dutch oven method works great, but I've found that instead
of the baking time after you remove the lid being
15 - 20 minutes, I need to let it go for about 30 to make sure the
interior is light.

I guess it's all in if you are willing to play with the methodology
till you find what works for you. I'm glad I did because
I really like being able to put bread to rise in the morning and have
a hot fresh loaf for dinner that evening.



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