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Old 07-09-2004, 02:49 PM
Kevintsheehy
 
Posts: n/a
Default Food Pyramid

Warning: this is (mostly) a USA-centric post.

Over the weekend, I skimmed the latest government report on
proposed nutrition guidelines. This morning, I'm reading the
food/cooking supplement to the local paper and come across
an article titled "Experts will restack the food pyramid" by
Elizabeth Lee of Cox (not Fox) News Service, which basically
summarizes the guidelines.

Ms. Cox's article includes a couple of statements that caught my
eye:

1. Following those guidelines would mean big changes for most
Americans, including eating more whole grains and dark-green
vegetables; cutting way back on added sugars, salt and solid fats
such as butter; and setting aside more time to exercise.

My reaction: Following the existing guidelines would mean big
changes for most Americans. Setting aside more time to exercise
isn't really the issue - it's getting any exercise whatsoever.

2. Don't wash meat and poultry, since that can spread bacteria
around the kitchen.

My reaction - I don't recall seeing such a comment in the food safety
part of the report, although I will go back and look. I always rinse meat
and poultry and clean up thoroughly afterwards. Is this an item of common
knowledge which I'm not aware of?

My overall reaction is that this is a well intentioned (maybe) but ultimately
futile effort involving significant cost and government processes. Why maybe?
As a nod to those who will insist that the government is in a conspiracy
with the food industry to promote economic over nutritional goals.

Ten, twenty and one hundred years from now, we and those who come
after us will still see TV (or whatever has taken the place of TV) reports
with obese people strolling through malls with gigantic bags of doughnuts,
and morbidly fat ladies who insist that they're beautiful and healthy and
we're too preoccupied with shallow images of ideal body types (lady,
nobody says you need to be Twiggy or Pamela Anderson or whoever ,
but you seriously need to lose a hundred pounds). People will still squander
hard earned dollars on ridiculous herbal supplements that promise im-
pressive weight loss with no effort, and kids will not have traded in Doritos
for carrot sticks.




  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 07-09-2004, 04:34 PM
PENMART01
 
Posts: n/a
Default

(Kevintsheehy) babbles:

2. Don't wash meat and poultry, since that can spread bacteria
around the kitchen.


Huh? Whaddaya, wrassel yer meat about the entire kitchen wielding a fire
hose... Idiot.


---= BOYCOTT FRANCE (belgium) GERMANY--SPAIN =---
---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =---
*********
"Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
Sheldon
````````````
  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 07-09-2004, 04:34 PM
PENMART01
 
Posts: n/a
Default

(Kevintsheehy) babbles:

2. Don't wash meat and poultry, since that can spread bacteria
around the kitchen.


Huh? Whaddaya, wrassel yer meat about the entire kitchen wielding a fire
hose... Idiot.


---= BOYCOTT FRANCE (belgium) GERMANY--SPAIN =---
---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =---
*********
"Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
Sheldon
````````````
  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 07-09-2004, 05:34 PM
Scott
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article ,
(Kevintsheehy) wrote:

2. Don't wash meat and poultry, since that can spread bacteria
around the kitchen.

My reaction - I don't recall seeing such a comment in the food safety
part of the report, although I will go back and look. I always rinse meat
and poultry and clean up thoroughly afterwards. Is this an item of common
knowledge which I'm not aware of?


Sounds counterintuitive, but the USDA does indeed hold that position, in
a limited way (the following is not from the food pyramid report--and it
seems strange that this topic would be):
http://www.fsis.usda.gov/OA/pubs/washing.htm

"Does Washing Food Promote Food Safety?

Historically, we equate washing to cleanliness. We wash clothes, linens,
cars, dishes, and ourselves. So, it is logical that many people believe
meat and poultry can be made cleaner and safer by washing it. Is this
true? Does washing meat, poultry, eggs, fruits, and vegetables make them
safer to eat?

Review of studies from several universities related to washing meat and
poultry indicate that there is no benefit. In fact, washing can allow
bacteria on meat and poultry to spread to other ready-to-eat foods. But
always remember, bacteria that is present on the surface of the meat or
poultry will be destroyed by cooking to a temperature of 160 F.

Cross-Contamination

Bacteria in raw meat and poultry juices can be spread to other foods,
utensils, and surfaces. We call this cross-contamination.

Hand washing after handling raw meat or poultry or its packaging is a
necessity because anything you touch afterwards could become
contaminated. In other words, you could become ill by picking up a piece
of fruit and eating it after handling raw meat or poultry. Practice good
hand washing before and after handling raw foods as well as when using
the bathroom, changing diapers, tending to a sick person, blowing your
nose, sneezing and coughing, and after petting animals.

It is important to prevent cross-contamination from raw meat or poultry
juices by washing counter tops and sinks with hot, soapy water. If
desired, you may sanitize with a solution of one teaspoon of liquid
chlorine bleach per quart of water.

Packaging materials from raw meat or poultry also can cause
cross-contamination. Never reuse them with other food items. These and
other disposable packaging materials, such as foam meat trays, egg
cartons, or plastic wraps, should be discarded.

Washing or Soaking Meat and Poultry

Washing raw poultry, beef, pork, lamb, or veal before cooking it is not
recommended. Some consumers think they are removing bacteria from the
meat and making it safer; however, any bacteria present on the surface
is destroyed by cooking it to a temperature of 160 F.

Callers to the USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline sometimes ask about soaking
poultry in salt water. This is a personal preference and serves no
purpose for food safety. If you choose to do this, however, preventing
cross-contamination when soaking and removing the poultry from the water
is essential.

Sometimes consumers wash or soak ham, bacon, or salt pork because they
think it reduces the sodium or salt enough to allow these products to be
eaten on a sodium-restricted diet. However, very little salt is removed
by washing, rinsing, or soaking a meat product and is not recommended.

Washing Eggs

Do not wash eggs before storing or using them. Washing is a routine part
of commercial egg processing and the eggs do not need to be washed
again. Federal regulations outline procedures and cleansers that may be
used. "Bloom", the natural coating on just-laid eggs that helps prevent
bacteria from permeating the shell, is removed by the washing process
and is replaced by a light coating of edible mineral oil which restores
protection. Extra handling of the eggs, such as washing, could increase
the risk of cross-contamination, especially if the shell becomes cracked.

Washing Produce

Before eating or preparing, wash fresh produce under cold running tap
water to remove any lingering dirt. This reduces bacteria that may be
present. If there is a firm surface, such as on apples or potatoes, the
surface can be scrubbed with a brush. Consumers should not wash fruits
and vegetables with detergent or soap. These products are not approved
or labeled by the Food and Drug Administration for use on foods. You
could ingest residues from soap or detergent absorbed on the produce.

When preparing fruits and vegetables, cut away any damaged or bruised
areas because bacteria that cause illness can thrive in those places.
Immediately refrigerate any fresh-cut items such as salad or fruit for
best quality and food safety."

--
to respond, change "spamless.invalid" with "optonline.net"
please mail OT responses only
  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 07-09-2004, 05:34 PM
Scott
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article ,
(Kevintsheehy) wrote:

2. Don't wash meat and poultry, since that can spread bacteria
around the kitchen.

My reaction - I don't recall seeing such a comment in the food safety
part of the report, although I will go back and look. I always rinse meat
and poultry and clean up thoroughly afterwards. Is this an item of common
knowledge which I'm not aware of?


Sounds counterintuitive, but the USDA does indeed hold that position, in
a limited way (the following is not from the food pyramid report--and it
seems strange that this topic would be):
http://www.fsis.usda.gov/OA/pubs/washing.htm

"Does Washing Food Promote Food Safety?

Historically, we equate washing to cleanliness. We wash clothes, linens,
cars, dishes, and ourselves. So, it is logical that many people believe
meat and poultry can be made cleaner and safer by washing it. Is this
true? Does washing meat, poultry, eggs, fruits, and vegetables make them
safer to eat?

Review of studies from several universities related to washing meat and
poultry indicate that there is no benefit. In fact, washing can allow
bacteria on meat and poultry to spread to other ready-to-eat foods. But
always remember, bacteria that is present on the surface of the meat or
poultry will be destroyed by cooking to a temperature of 160 F.

Cross-Contamination

Bacteria in raw meat and poultry juices can be spread to other foods,
utensils, and surfaces. We call this cross-contamination.

Hand washing after handling raw meat or poultry or its packaging is a
necessity because anything you touch afterwards could become
contaminated. In other words, you could become ill by picking up a piece
of fruit and eating it after handling raw meat or poultry. Practice good
hand washing before and after handling raw foods as well as when using
the bathroom, changing diapers, tending to a sick person, blowing your
nose, sneezing and coughing, and after petting animals.

It is important to prevent cross-contamination from raw meat or poultry
juices by washing counter tops and sinks with hot, soapy water. If
desired, you may sanitize with a solution of one teaspoon of liquid
chlorine bleach per quart of water.

Packaging materials from raw meat or poultry also can cause
cross-contamination. Never reuse them with other food items. These and
other disposable packaging materials, such as foam meat trays, egg
cartons, or plastic wraps, should be discarded.

Washing or Soaking Meat and Poultry

Washing raw poultry, beef, pork, lamb, or veal before cooking it is not
recommended. Some consumers think they are removing bacteria from the
meat and making it safer; however, any bacteria present on the surface
is destroyed by cooking it to a temperature of 160 F.

Callers to the USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline sometimes ask about soaking
poultry in salt water. This is a personal preference and serves no
purpose for food safety. If you choose to do this, however, preventing
cross-contamination when soaking and removing the poultry from the water
is essential.

Sometimes consumers wash or soak ham, bacon, or salt pork because they
think it reduces the sodium or salt enough to allow these products to be
eaten on a sodium-restricted diet. However, very little salt is removed
by washing, rinsing, or soaking a meat product and is not recommended.

Washing Eggs

Do not wash eggs before storing or using them. Washing is a routine part
of commercial egg processing and the eggs do not need to be washed
again. Federal regulations outline procedures and cleansers that may be
used. "Bloom", the natural coating on just-laid eggs that helps prevent
bacteria from permeating the shell, is removed by the washing process
and is replaced by a light coating of edible mineral oil which restores
protection. Extra handling of the eggs, such as washing, could increase
the risk of cross-contamination, especially if the shell becomes cracked.

Washing Produce

Before eating or preparing, wash fresh produce under cold running tap
water to remove any lingering dirt. This reduces bacteria that may be
present. If there is a firm surface, such as on apples or potatoes, the
surface can be scrubbed with a brush. Consumers should not wash fruits
and vegetables with detergent or soap. These products are not approved
or labeled by the Food and Drug Administration for use on foods. You
could ingest residues from soap or detergent absorbed on the produce.

When preparing fruits and vegetables, cut away any damaged or bruised
areas because bacteria that cause illness can thrive in those places.
Immediately refrigerate any fresh-cut items such as salad or fruit for
best quality and food safety."

--
to respond, change "spamless.invalid" with "optonline.net"
please mail OT responses only
  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 07-09-2004, 05:34 PM
Scott
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article ,
(Kevintsheehy) wrote:

2. Don't wash meat and poultry, since that can spread bacteria
around the kitchen.

My reaction - I don't recall seeing such a comment in the food safety
part of the report, although I will go back and look. I always rinse meat
and poultry and clean up thoroughly afterwards. Is this an item of common
knowledge which I'm not aware of?


Sounds counterintuitive, but the USDA does indeed hold that position, in
a limited way (the following is not from the food pyramid report--and it
seems strange that this topic would be):
http://www.fsis.usda.gov/OA/pubs/washing.htm

"Does Washing Food Promote Food Safety?

Historically, we equate washing to cleanliness. We wash clothes, linens,
cars, dishes, and ourselves. So, it is logical that many people believe
meat and poultry can be made cleaner and safer by washing it. Is this
true? Does washing meat, poultry, eggs, fruits, and vegetables make them
safer to eat?

Review of studies from several universities related to washing meat and
poultry indicate that there is no benefit. In fact, washing can allow
bacteria on meat and poultry to spread to other ready-to-eat foods. But
always remember, bacteria that is present on the surface of the meat or
poultry will be destroyed by cooking to a temperature of 160 F.

Cross-Contamination

Bacteria in raw meat and poultry juices can be spread to other foods,
utensils, and surfaces. We call this cross-contamination.

Hand washing after handling raw meat or poultry or its packaging is a
necessity because anything you touch afterwards could become
contaminated. In other words, you could become ill by picking up a piece
of fruit and eating it after handling raw meat or poultry. Practice good
hand washing before and after handling raw foods as well as when using
the bathroom, changing diapers, tending to a sick person, blowing your
nose, sneezing and coughing, and after petting animals.

It is important to prevent cross-contamination from raw meat or poultry
juices by washing counter tops and sinks with hot, soapy water. If
desired, you may sanitize with a solution of one teaspoon of liquid
chlorine bleach per quart of water.

Packaging materials from raw meat or poultry also can cause
cross-contamination. Never reuse them with other food items. These and
other disposable packaging materials, such as foam meat trays, egg
cartons, or plastic wraps, should be discarded.

Washing or Soaking Meat and Poultry

Washing raw poultry, beef, pork, lamb, or veal before cooking it is not
recommended. Some consumers think they are removing bacteria from the
meat and making it safer; however, any bacteria present on the surface
is destroyed by cooking it to a temperature of 160 F.

Callers to the USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline sometimes ask about soaking
poultry in salt water. This is a personal preference and serves no
purpose for food safety. If you choose to do this, however, preventing
cross-contamination when soaking and removing the poultry from the water
is essential.

Sometimes consumers wash or soak ham, bacon, or salt pork because they
think it reduces the sodium or salt enough to allow these products to be
eaten on a sodium-restricted diet. However, very little salt is removed
by washing, rinsing, or soaking a meat product and is not recommended.

Washing Eggs

Do not wash eggs before storing or using them. Washing is a routine part
of commercial egg processing and the eggs do not need to be washed
again. Federal regulations outline procedures and cleansers that may be
used. "Bloom", the natural coating on just-laid eggs that helps prevent
bacteria from permeating the shell, is removed by the washing process
and is replaced by a light coating of edible mineral oil which restores
protection. Extra handling of the eggs, such as washing, could increase
the risk of cross-contamination, especially if the shell becomes cracked.

Washing Produce

Before eating or preparing, wash fresh produce under cold running tap
water to remove any lingering dirt. This reduces bacteria that may be
present. If there is a firm surface, such as on apples or potatoes, the
surface can be scrubbed with a brush. Consumers should not wash fruits
and vegetables with detergent or soap. These products are not approved
or labeled by the Food and Drug Administration for use on foods. You
could ingest residues from soap or detergent absorbed on the produce.

When preparing fruits and vegetables, cut away any damaged or bruised
areas because bacteria that cause illness can thrive in those places.
Immediately refrigerate any fresh-cut items such as salad or fruit for
best quality and food safety."

--
to respond, change "spamless.invalid" with "optonline.net"
please mail OT responses only
  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 07-09-2004, 05:40 PM
PENMART01
 
Posts: n/a
Default

(J.J. in WA) writes:

(PENMART01) wrote:
(Kevintsheehy) babbles:

2. Don't wash meat and poultry, since that can spread bacteria
around the kitchen.


Huh? Whaddaya, wrassel yer meat about the entire kitchen wielding a fire
hose... Idiot.


To be fair, Kevin's just quoting the proposed USDA guidelines, not
agreeing with them.


Posting articles to Newsgroups without indicating disagreement (in whole or
part) indicates *agreement* by the poster by sheer virtue of their posting said
articles. If yoose choose to support an Idiot then you is one too.


---= BOYCOTT FRANCE (belgium) GERMANY--SPAIN =---
---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =---
*********
"Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
Sheldon
````````````
  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 07-09-2004, 05:40 PM
PENMART01
 
Posts: n/a
Default

(J.J. in WA) writes:

(PENMART01) wrote:
(Kevintsheehy) babbles:

2. Don't wash meat and poultry, since that can spread bacteria
around the kitchen.


Huh? Whaddaya, wrassel yer meat about the entire kitchen wielding a fire
hose... Idiot.


To be fair, Kevin's just quoting the proposed USDA guidelines, not
agreeing with them.


Posting articles to Newsgroups without indicating disagreement (in whole or
part) indicates *agreement* by the poster by sheer virtue of their posting said
articles. If yoose choose to support an Idiot then you is one too.


---= BOYCOTT FRANCE (belgium) GERMANY--SPAIN =---
---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =---
*********
"Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
Sheldon
````````````


  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 07-09-2004, 07:40 PM
PENMART01
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Scott heimdall writes:

(Kevintsheehy) wrote:


2. Don't wash meat and poultry, since that can spread bacteria
around the kitchen.

My reaction - I don't recall seeing such a comment in the food safety
part of the report, although I will go back and look. I always rinse meat
and poultry and clean up thoroughly afterwards. Is this an item of common
knowledge which I'm not aware of?


Sounds counterintuitive, but the USDA does indeed hold that position, in
a limited way (the following is not from the food pyramid report--and it
seems strange that this topic would be):
http://www.fsis.usda.gov/OA/pubs/washing.htm

"Does Washing Food Promote Food Safety?

Historically, we equate washing to cleanliness. We wash clothes, linens,
cars, dishes, and ourselves. So, it is logical that many people believe
meat and poultry can be made cleaner and"/or" safer by washing it.


NOW it makes "LOGICAL" sense (see above "emender"). The USDA is a government
agency, likewise the rest, harbors many, many Idiots.

I wash food to make it cleaner, not nessesarily safer... naturally I realize
that many of yoose claim washing food is not only unessesary but also stupid...
to that I reply that many of yoose have your taste in your ass by virtue of
your propensity to eat shit, albiet food safe shit. Yes, cooking sterilizes
shit, but unlike yoose Idiots I'd druther not indulge.

More than one filthy unwashed slob (mostly yoose 'talians n' frogs- hehe) has
had a steep dental repair bill foisted on them simply because their grotesque
inbred sanitary habits prevented their washing that sliver of bone from that
pork chop... another of the reasons I detest preground stupidmarket mystery
meat, often a bit of bone gets ground in, and ya can't wash that away... once
cracked a perfectly good crown from biting down on a piece of bone inside a
store bought 'talian sausage... least ingesting the ground in rodent turds and
roaches ain't nearly so expensive a nasty.


---= BOYCOTT FRANCE (belgium) GERMANY--SPAIN =---
---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =---
*********
"Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
Sheldon
````````````
  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 07-09-2004, 07:40 PM
PENMART01
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Scott heimdall writes:

(Kevintsheehy) wrote:


2. Don't wash meat and poultry, since that can spread bacteria
around the kitchen.

My reaction - I don't recall seeing such a comment in the food safety
part of the report, although I will go back and look. I always rinse meat
and poultry and clean up thoroughly afterwards. Is this an item of common
knowledge which I'm not aware of?


Sounds counterintuitive, but the USDA does indeed hold that position, in
a limited way (the following is not from the food pyramid report--and it
seems strange that this topic would be):
http://www.fsis.usda.gov/OA/pubs/washing.htm

"Does Washing Food Promote Food Safety?

Historically, we equate washing to cleanliness. We wash clothes, linens,
cars, dishes, and ourselves. So, it is logical that many people believe
meat and poultry can be made cleaner and"/or" safer by washing it.


NOW it makes "LOGICAL" sense (see above "emender"). The USDA is a government
agency, likewise the rest, harbors many, many Idiots.

I wash food to make it cleaner, not nessesarily safer... naturally I realize
that many of yoose claim washing food is not only unessesary but also stupid...
to that I reply that many of yoose have your taste in your ass by virtue of
your propensity to eat shit, albiet food safe shit. Yes, cooking sterilizes
shit, but unlike yoose Idiots I'd druther not indulge.

More than one filthy unwashed slob (mostly yoose 'talians n' frogs- hehe) has
had a steep dental repair bill foisted on them simply because their grotesque
inbred sanitary habits prevented their washing that sliver of bone from that
pork chop... another of the reasons I detest preground stupidmarket mystery
meat, often a bit of bone gets ground in, and ya can't wash that away... once
cracked a perfectly good crown from biting down on a piece of bone inside a
store bought 'talian sausage... least ingesting the ground in rodent turds and
roaches ain't nearly so expensive a nasty.


---= BOYCOTT FRANCE (belgium) GERMANY--SPAIN =---
---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =---
*********
"Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
Sheldon
````````````
  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 07-09-2004, 08:03 PM
jmk
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On 9/7/2004 9:49 AM, Kevintsheehy wrote:
Warning: this is (mostly) a USA-centric post.

Over the weekend, I skimmed the latest government report on
proposed nutrition guidelines. This morning, I'm reading the
food/cooking supplement to the local paper and come across
an article titled "Experts will restack the food pyramid" by
Elizabeth Lee of Cox (not Fox) News Service, which basically
summarizes the guidelines.


Have you read Food Politics?



--
jmk in NC
  #14 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 07-09-2004, 08:03 PM
jmk
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On 9/7/2004 9:49 AM, Kevintsheehy wrote:
Warning: this is (mostly) a USA-centric post.

Over the weekend, I skimmed the latest government report on
proposed nutrition guidelines. This morning, I'm reading the
food/cooking supplement to the local paper and come across
an article titled "Experts will restack the food pyramid" by
Elizabeth Lee of Cox (not Fox) News Service, which basically
summarizes the guidelines.


Have you read Food Politics?



--
jmk in NC
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