General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-01-2008, 09:52 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 27
Default Honey!....Is there a Use By Date for Honey?...

I see that there was found some honey in one of the Pharaoh's Tombs that was
over 3000 years old!... But a lot of Honey that I have bought or been given
(like special flower and Tree types) have been left in the back of my pantry
through lack of use (I mainly use honey for Flavouring Oriental Marinades
and use in boiled Veggies, like carrots etc) has developed a rank flavour
etc....

Any comments on this?

--
Bigbazza (Barry) Oz


  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-01-2008, 11:10 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 1,325
Default Honey!....Is there a Use By Date for Honey?...

"Bigbazza" wrote in
:

I see that there was found some honey in one of the Pharaoh's Tombs
that was over 3000 years old!... But a lot of Honey that I have bought
or been given (like special flower and Tree types) have been left in
the back of my pantry through lack of use (I mainly use honey for
Flavouring Oriental Marinades and use in boiled Veggies, like carrots
etc) has developed a rank flavour etc....

Any comments on this?



Honeybee's honey can last for thousands of years. Tropical stingless
bee's honey doesn't and therefore must be kept refrigerated if you want
it to last for a long time. This is because it contains a higher nectar
and pollen content than you regular honey which gives it a pleasant
acid/citris flavour.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stingless_bee

Like the European honey bee (Apis mellifera) which provides most of
Australia's commercially-produced honey, stingless bees have enlarged
areas on their back legs for carrying pollen back to the hive. After a
foraging expedition, these pollen baskets or corbiculae can be seen
stuffed full of bright orange or yellow pollen. Stingless bees also
collect nectar, which they store in an extension of their gut called a
crop. Back at the hive, the bees ripen or dehydrate the nectar droplets
by spinning them inside their mouthparts until honey is formed. Ripening
concentrates the nectar and increases the sugar content, though it is
not nearly as concentrated as the honey from true honeybees; it is much
thinner in consistency, and more prone to spoiling.

--
Peter Lucas
Brisbane
Australia


Wars begin where you will...
but they do not end where you please.

Machiavelli
  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-01-2008, 12:22 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 3,971
Default Honey!....Is there a Use By Date for Honey?...

On Wed 02 Jan 2008 04:10:55a, PeterLucas told us...

"Bigbazza" wrote in
:

I see that there was found some honey in one of the Pharaoh's Tombs
that was over 3000 years old!... But a lot of Honey that I have bought
or been given (like special flower and Tree types) have been left in
the back of my pantry through lack of use (I mainly use honey for
Flavouring Oriental Marinades and use in boiled Veggies, like carrots
etc) has developed a rank flavour etc....

Any comments on this?



Honeybee's honey can last for thousands of years. Tropical stingless
bee's honey doesn't and therefore must be kept refrigerated if you want
it to last for a long time. This is because it contains a higher nectar
and pollen content than you regular honey which gives it a pleasant
acid/citris flavour.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stingless_bee

Like the European honey bee (Apis mellifera) which provides most of
Australia's commercially-produced honey, stingless bees have enlarged
areas on their back legs for carrying pollen back to the hive. After a
foraging expedition, these pollen baskets or corbiculae can be seen
stuffed full of bright orange or yellow pollen. Stingless bees also
collect nectar, which they store in an extension of their gut called a
crop. Back at the hive, the bees ripen or dehydrate the nectar droplets
by spinning them inside their mouthparts until honey is formed. Ripening
concentrates the nectar and increases the sugar content, though it is
not nearly as concentrated as the honey from true honeybees; it is much
thinner in consistency, and more prone to spoiling.


This may be an exception, but I was given a half-gallon jar of Tupelo honey
about 13-14 years ago. I don't use honey often and still have about a half
of the jar left. It has never been refrigerated and is still good.

--
Wayne Boatwright

*******************************************
Date: Wednesday, 01(I)/02(II)/08(MMVIII)
*******************************************
Cats must catch and eat lizards.
*******************************************






Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Honey... no expiration date :) jmcquown[_2_] General Cooking 36 27-08-2013 05:26 PM
Honey Julie Bove Diabetic 24 23-06-2009 03:16 AM
How do you like your honey?- Honey Bars recipe Julia Altshuler General Cooking 0 30-01-2008 02:42 PM
Raw Honey KenCo Preserving 0 03-12-2004 06:12 AM
Jan: Church's Honey Biscuits with Honey Butter Duckie Recipes 0 13-05-2004 01:24 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 05:24 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2022 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"

 

Copyright © 2017