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Old 14-12-2007, 01:15 PM posted to rec.food.cooking,aus.food
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Default Freezing and storing cooked turkey?

G'day mates,

I didn't really want or need a turkey for Xmas, but you know how
bloody Murphy works -- I won one at the pub tonight! (I wanted the
ham! :-)

Okay, so let's assume I can work out a way to cook the damn thing
acceptably -- then what do I do with the leftovers?

I presume it *is* possible to freeze and store cooked turkey for a
reasonable length of time, but what would you recommend as the best
way to do it?

I tried a google approach, but was left a little confused: One site
told me that cooked turkey slices would store frozen for a month and
the gravy or broth for 2 to 3 months. But it also said the cooked
slices stored in gravy or broth would store frozen for 6 months!

Clearly not a simple linear relationship!

So, waddaya reckon mates? How do you do it for best results?
TIA.

Cheers, Phred.

--
LID


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Old 14-12-2007, 04:38 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Freezing and storing cooked turkey?

On Dec 14, 7:15 am, (Phred) wrote:
G'day mates,

I didn't really want or need a turkey for Xmas, but you know how
bloody Murphy works -- I won one at the pub tonight! (I wanted the
ham! :-)

Okay, so let's assume I can work out a way to cook the damn thing
acceptably -- then what do I do with the leftovers?

I presume it *is* possible to freeze and store cooked turkey for a
reasonable length of time, but what would you recommend as the best
way to do it?

I tried a google approach, but was left a little confused: One site
told me that cooked turkey slices would store frozen for a month and
the gravy or broth for 2 to 3 months. But it also said the cooked
slices stored in gravy or broth would store frozen for 6 months!

Clearly not a simple linear relationship!

So, waddaya reckon mates? How do you do it for best results?
TIA.

Cheers, Phred.

--


You can store it in a freezer for as long as you want - after a few
months, though, the texture will likely suffer and it may lose some
flavor. Seal it in portions that you will use later, instead of all
glopped together in one big mass. I usually separate dark from white,
since my family likes one or the other.

Seal it as air-tight as possible.

I like to freeze the leftover white meat in sandwich portions.

N.
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Old 14-12-2007, 08:31 PM posted to rec.food.cooking,aus.food
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Default Freezing and storing cooked turkey?

Phred wrote:
G'day mates,

I didn't really want or need a turkey for Xmas, but you know how
bloody Murphy works -- I won one at the pub tonight! (I wanted the
ham! :-)

Okay, so let's assume I can work out a way to cook the damn thing
acceptably -- then what do I do with the leftovers?

I presume it *is* possible to freeze and store cooked turkey for a
reasonable length of time, but what would you recommend as the best
way to do it?

I tried a google approach, but was left a little confused: One site
told me that cooked turkey slices would store frozen for a month and
the gravy or broth for 2 to 3 months. But it also said the cooked
slices stored in gravy or broth would store frozen for 6 months!

Clearly not a simple linear relationship!

So, waddaya reckon mates? How do you do it for best results?
TIA.

Cheers, Phred.




Eat turkey sandwiches for a few days, then wrap what's left tightly in
freezer paper or heavy duty aluminium foil and freeze it. It will keep
for many months in the freezer, deteriorating *very* slowly. Use it in
soups and casseroles when you thaw it. Freeze the leftover gravy
separately for the most versatility.

Bob
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Old 14-12-2007, 10:18 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Freezing and storing cooked turkey?

On Fri, 14 Dec 2007 13:15:57 GMT, (Phred)
wrote:

One word: "Tilia Food Saver" - MIke
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Old 15-12-2007, 11:09 AM posted to rec.food.cooking,aus.food
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Default Freezing and storing cooked turkey?

Phred wrote:

I tried a google approach, but was left a little confused: One site
told me that cooked turkey slices would store frozen for a month and
the gravy or broth for 2 to 3 months. But it also said the cooked
slices stored in gravy or broth would store frozen for 6 months!


I reckon things keep forever if frozen. I had a roast beef adn sundry other
bits o meat and stuff in my freezer when I set off to teach skiing in the US
last november, and when I returned in May, they were still there. et them
all and didn't die or anything. Maybe you could chop the turkey in half,
leave one half in the freezer and cook the other half? Or cook the lot, chop
it up, freeze it, and make some lovely stock with the left over bones and
stuff.

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ant
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Old 02-01-2008, 11:14 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default How do you cook turkey breasts? [Was: Freezing and storing cooked turkey?]

G'day mates,

Following on from the previous thread:

In article , "ant"
wrote:
[snip]
Maybe you could chop the turkey in half, leave one half in the freezer
and cook the other half? Or cook the lot, chop it up, freeze it, and make
some lovely stock with the left over bones and stuff.


Okay. The problem wasn't as dramatic as I assumed. As I mentioned
just before Xmas, the "turkey" was a package of two frozen turkey
breasts "Self-basting Ezyroast Turkey Breasts" to give the full
marketing title. The total weight is given as 3.2 kg (about 7 lb).

But now the time is approaching when something needs to be done about
cooking the damn things. Hence this appeal to the turkey experts in
RFC. (Come to that, one assumes *all* Americans are cooking experts
when it comes to preparing turkey; you seem to eat enough of them. :-)

Popular opinion here is that turkey breasts are "dry" and scarcely
worth the trouble and energy consumption to cook them. But I'm
prepared to be surprised -- in fact, I *hope* to be surprised!

So, mates, how would you handle these things so they don't end up dry
and/or tasteless?

In the meantime, Happy New Year to all.

Cheers, Phred.

--
LID

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Old 02-01-2008, 02:16 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default How do you cook turkey breasts? [Was: Freezing and storing cooked turkey?]

On Wed, 2 Jan 2008 06:27:37 -0600, Sqwertz
wrote:

On Wed, 02 Jan 2008 11:14:34 GMT, Phred wrote:

So, mates, how would you handle these things so they don't end up dry
and/or tasteless?


You thaw and brine them.


No need! Just put them in a pyrex dish with an onion, some celery,
herbs if you like them, and half a cup of water, then roast them on a
fairly low heat until they're done. We bought an UNbrined turkey
breast for Thanksgiving and again for Christmas and they both came out
wonderful. I cooked them according to the directions on the package
but included half a cup of water to help keep them moist. (the packet
says DO NOT ADD WATER - ignore it!)


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