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Old 06-06-2007, 01:51 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Hey Dave, check out my shopping cart!

I bought a bag of Jay's kettle-fried potato chips and a gallon of skim milk!
LOL

*But* I also got a couple of pork steaks to throw on the grill later in the
week. Also some catfish fillets and crawfish tail meat (gonna make one of
my signature dishes, Catfish Acadian, next weekend, recipe to follow). I'll
go back to buy bell pepper, celery and the shallots. My fridge runneth over


My cart also included vegetables. A bunch of broccoli, a head of
cauliflower, asparagus (both white and green) and the yellow corn on the cob
looked pretty good for this time of year so I grabbed three ears. I'll
probably grill it next to the pork steaks. Somehow pork and corn seem to go
together, don't ask me why.

Oh, and I got some baby artichoke hearts. I very rarely see those! They
will be rinsed then dredged in sea salt and browned in olive oil. I saw a
woman (Polish, maybe?) do that on PBS on the show 'Jewish Cooking with Joan
Nathan' a few years back and man are they tasty that way!

Catfish Acadian

2 lbs. catfish fillets
seasoned flour
olive oil
butter
diced onions and garlic or shallots
diced bell pepper
diced celery
1/2 c. crawfish tail meat
4 large shrimp, chopped
whole cream
salt & cayenne pepper

Lightly coat the catfish fillets in seasoned flour. Pan fry in olive oil
until lightly browned and tender. Plate and hold in a warm oven. In another
pan, saute the onion and garlic (or shallots) with the bell pepper and
celery in butter until tender. Add the crawfish tail meat and shrimp and
saute until just pink. Stir in some cream; season with salt and a little
cayenne pepper. Pour this mixture over the catfish and serve. Serves 4.

Jill



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Old 06-06-2007, 06:36 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Hey Dave, check out my shopping cart!

In article ,
"jmcquown" wrote:

Catfish Acadian

2 lbs. catfish fillets
seasoned flour
olive oil
butter
diced onions and garlic or shallots
diced bell pepper
diced celery
1/2 c. crawfish tail meat
4 large shrimp, chopped
whole cream
salt & cayenne pepper

Lightly coat the catfish fillets in seasoned flour. Pan fry in olive oil
until lightly browned and tender. Plate and hold in a warm oven. In another
pan, saute the onion and garlic (or shallots) with the bell pepper and
celery in butter until tender. Add the crawfish tail meat and shrimp and
saute until just pink. Stir in some cream; season with salt and a little
cayenne pepper. Pour this mixture over the catfish and serve. Serves 4.

Jill


Sounds interesting, and pretty low carb. :-)

I agree that corn goes well with pork. Corn on the cob is slowly coming
into season too and the price is dropping. I like white better than
yellow, and the mixed is even better.
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Old 06-06-2007, 06:58 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Artichokes (was Hey Dave, check out my shopping cart!)

jmcquown wrote:

Oh, and I got some baby artichoke hearts. I very rarely see those! They
will be rinsed then dredged in sea salt and browned in olive oil. I saw a
woman (Polish, maybe?) do that on PBS on the show 'Jewish Cooking with Joan
Nathan' a few years back and man are they tasty that way!


That sounds a bit like a simplified version of the (still fairly simple)
carciofi alla romana, so the woman was probably from Rome. However,
this is a bit strange, as there are also the famous and rather more
elaborate carciofi alla giudža, also from Rome, which would be
presumably more appropriate on a Jewish cooking show. In any case, any
attempt to reproduce either dish outside of Italy and particularly of
Rome would result in no more than an approximation, as the artichokes
used are different. In Rome, it is the purplish cimaroli (top-growing),
also called mammole (moms), grown mostly in Ladispoli near Rome (where a
Sagra del Carciofo, a festival of artichokes, is celebrated every April)
that are used for either dish. Moreover, only baby artichokes called
figlioli (children) are supposed to be used for carciofi alla giudža and
even smaller specimens called nipoti (grandchildren) are used for
carciofi alla romana. For both dishes, whole artichokes, just trimmed
of the tough outer leaves, are used, not just hearts. The hearts, by
the way, are not fuzzy at all. Also, carciofi alla romana are properly
prepared with mentuccia, a kind of wild mint that grows only in the Rome
region and has no counterpart anywhere else, as far as I know.

Victor
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Old 06-06-2007, 10:09 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Artichokes (was Hey Dave, check out my shopping cart!)

Victor Sack wrote:
jmcquown wrote:

Oh, and I got some baby artichoke hearts. I very rarely see those!
They will be rinsed then dredged in sea salt and browned in olive
oil. I saw a woman (Polish, maybe?) do that on PBS on the show
'Jewish Cooking with Joan Nathan' a few years back and man are they
tasty that way!


That sounds a bit like a simplified version of the (still fairly
simple) carciofi alla romana, so the woman was probably from Rome.
However, this is a bit strange, as there are also the famous and
rather more elaborate carciofi alla giudža, also from Rome, which
would be presumably more appropriate on a Jewish cooking show. In
any case, any attempt to reproduce either dish outside of Italy and
particularly of Rome would result in no more than an approximation,
as the artichokes used are different. In Rome, it is the purplish
cimaroli (top-growing), also called mammole (moms), grown mostly in
Ladispoli near Rome (where a Sagra del Carciofo, a festival of
artichokes, is celebrated every April) that are used for either dish.
Moreover, only baby artichokes called figlioli (children) are
supposed to be used for carciofi alla giudža and even smaller
specimens called nipoti (grandchildren) are used for carciofi alla
romana. For both dishes, whole artichokes, just trimmed of the tough
outer leaves, are used, not just hearts. The hearts, by the way, are
not fuzzy at all. Also, carciofi alla romana are properly prepared
with mentuccia, a kind of wild mint that grows only in the Rome
region and has no counterpart anywhere else, as far as I know.

Victor


Interesting, thanks Victor! Actually, I typed artichoke hearts but they are
whole artichokes, very small. Don't know what my fingers were thinking!

Jill


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Old 07-06-2007, 01:26 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Hey Dave, check out my shopping cart!

jmcquown wrote:
I bought a bag of Jay's kettle-fried potato chips and a gallon of skim milk!
LOL

*But* I also got a couple of pork steaks to throw on the grill later in the
week. Also some catfish fillets and crawfish tail meat (gonna make one of
my signature dishes, Catfish Acadian, next weekend, recipe to follow). I'll
go back to buy bell pepper, celery and the shallots. My fridge runneth over


My cart also included vegetables. A bunch of broccoli, a head of
cauliflower, asparagus (both white and green) and the yellow corn on the cob
looked pretty good for this time of year so I grabbed three ears. I'll
probably grill it next to the pork steaks. Somehow pork and corn seem to go
together, don't ask me why.

Oh, and I got some baby artichoke hearts. I very rarely see those! They
will be rinsed then dredged in sea salt and browned in olive oil. I saw a
woman (Polish, maybe?) do that on PBS on the show 'Jewish Cooking with Joan
Nathan' a few years back and man are they tasty that way!

Catfish Acadian

2 lbs. catfish fillets
seasoned flour
olive oil
butter
diced onions and garlic or shallots
diced bell pepper
diced celery
1/2 c. crawfish tail meat
4 large shrimp, chopped
whole cream
salt & cayenne pepper

Lightly coat the catfish fillets in seasoned flour. Pan fry in olive oil
until lightly browned and tender. Plate and hold in a warm oven. In another
pan, saute the onion and garlic (or shallots) with the bell pepper and
celery in butter until tender. Add the crawfish tail meat and shrimp and
saute until just pink. Stir in some cream; season with salt and a little
cayenne pepper. Pour this mixture over the catfish and serve. Serves 4.

Jill


That sounds almost simple enough for me to try!
I've recently been looking into the making of crayfish traps,
coincidentally enough... The last trout I caught on a dry fly had a
whole baby crayfish in it's stomach, so I know we've got crayfish here!
Any tips on the quantity of whole (heavy?) cream your recipe might use?


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Old 07-06-2007, 01:59 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Hey Dave, check out my shopping cart!

none wrote:
jmcquown wrote:
*But* I also got a couple of pork steaks to throw on the grill later
in the week. Also some catfish fillets and crawfish tail meat
(gonna make one of my signature dishes, Catfish Acadian, next
weekend, recipe to follow).

Catfish Acadian

2 lbs. catfish fillets
seasoned flour
olive oil
butter
diced onions and garlic or shallots
diced bell pepper
diced celery
1/2 c. crawfish tail meat
4 large shrimp, chopped
whole cream
salt & cayenne pepper

That sounds almost simple enough for me to try!
I've recently been looking into the making of crayfish traps,
coincidentally enough... The last trout I caught on a dry fly had a
whole baby crayfish in it's stomach, so I know we've got crayfish
here! Any tips on the quantity of whole (heavy?) cream your recipe
might use?


Sorry, I just eyeball the amount (same with the butter, olive oil and salt &
cayenne pepper). I'd say about 8 fluid oz. You don't really want too much
sauce.

Jill


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Old 08-06-2007, 03:40 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Artichokes (was Hey Dave, check out my shopping cart!)

On Wed, 6 Jun 2007 04:09:44 -0500, "jmcquown"
wrote:

I typed artichoke hearts but they are
whole artichokes, very small. Don't know what my fingers were thinking!


Your fingers have a mind of their own.

BTDT

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Old 09-06-2007, 10:18 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Hey Dave, check out my shopping cart!

jmcquown wrote:
none wrote:
jmcquown wrote:
*But* I also got a couple of pork steaks to throw on the grill later
in the week. Also some catfish fillets and crawfish tail meat
(gonna make one of my signature dishes, Catfish Acadian, next
weekend, recipe to follow).

Catfish Acadian

2 lbs. catfish fillets
seasoned flour
olive oil
butter
diced onions and garlic or shallots
diced bell pepper
diced celery
1/2 c. crawfish tail meat
4 large shrimp, chopped
whole cream
salt & cayenne pepper

That sounds almost simple enough for me to try!
I've recently been looking into the making of crayfish traps,
coincidentally enough... The last trout I caught on a dry fly had a
whole baby crayfish in it's stomach, so I know we've got crayfish
here! Any tips on the quantity of whole (heavy?) cream your recipe
might use?


Sorry, I just eyeball the amount (same with the butter, olive oil and salt &
cayenne pepper). I'd say about 8 fluid oz. You don't really want too much
sauce.

Jill



Ok, I'll just "wing it" if I can get my act together around here and try
something more time-consuming than heating up frozen cheese ravioli from
a bag, with marinara sauce from a jar. I'm ashamed of myself, but my
stomach is full! I'm also still trying to figure out why farm-raised
catfish at Costco is more expensive per pound than the other fish. Trout
are the cheapest, then salmon, dover sole, and then catfish. There was a
time when catfish was po' folk food!
In other news: I just noticed that the Festival brand canned sliced
mushrooms I bought at Costco are a "Product of China". Hmmm... Maybe
I'll take them back to the store for a refund.
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Old 09-06-2007, 11:10 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Hey Dave, check out my shopping cart!

In article ,
none wrote:

I just noticed that the Festival brand canned sliced
mushrooms I bought at Costco are a "Product of China". Hmmm... Maybe
I'll take them back to the store for a refund.


Why?
--
Peace, Om

Remove _ to validate e-mails.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a Son of a bitch" -- Jack Nicholson
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Old 17-07-2007, 05:08 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Hey Dave, check out my shopping cart!

What's in your 'seasoned flour'?

I assume salt and pepper, but what else?

Al


"Barbaretta" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 5 Jun 2007 19:51:59 -0500, jmcquown wrote:

My fridge runneth over


Of course. It's food stamp week. It doesn't surprise me that
you bought cleaned crawfish meat with them.

-sw



My cart also included vegetables. A bunch of broccoli, a head of
cauliflower, asparagus (both white and green) and the yellow corn on the
cob
looked pretty good for this time of year so I grabbed three ears. I'll
probably grill it next to the pork steaks. Somehow pork and corn seem to
go
together, don't ask me why.

Oh, and I got some baby artichoke hearts. I very rarely see those! They
will be rinsed then dredged in sea salt and browned in olive oil. I saw
a
woman (Polish, maybe?) do that on PBS on the show 'Jewish Cooking with
Joan
Nathan' a few years back and man are they tasty that way!

Catfish Acadian

2 lbs. catfish fillets
seasoned flour
olive oil
butter
diced onions and garlic or shallots
diced bell pepper
diced celery
1/2 c. crawfish tail meat
4 large shrimp, chopped
whole cream
salt & cayenne pepper

Lightly coat the catfish fillets in seasoned flour. Pan fry in olive oil
until lightly browned and tender. Plate and hold in a warm oven. In
another
pan, saute the onion and garlic (or shallots) with the bell pepper and
celery in butter until tender. Add the crawfish tail meat and shrimp and
saute until just pink. Stir in some cream; season with salt and a little
cayenne pepper. Pour this mixture over the catfish and serve. Serves 4.

Jill





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