Barbecue (alt.food.barbecue) Discuss barbecue and grilling--southern style "low and slow" smoking of ribs, shoulders and briskets, as well as direct heat grilling of everything from burgers to salmon to vegetables.

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Old 30-03-2008, 12:45 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Walt Fles wrote:
I brined a pork shoulder roast overnight to prepare for smoking.


Why?

--
Dave
www.davebbq.com



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Old 30-03-2008, 02:33 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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I brined a pork shoulder roast overnight to prepare for smoking.
I spent about 6 hours smoking with royal oak lump and some mesquite chunks.

It turned out quite good - not too salty form the brine but you could
taste it a bit. A definite smoke ring, good flavor, and a nice juicy cut
of meat.

I'm definitely happy with this purchase!
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Old 30-03-2008, 04:59 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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On Mar 29, 9:33 pm, Walt Fles wrote:
I brined a pork shoulder roast overnight to prepare for smoking.
I spent about 6 hours smoking with royal oak lump and some mesquite chunks.

It turned out quite good - not too salty form the brine but you could
taste it a bit. A definite smoke ring, good flavor, and a nice juicy cut
of meat.

I'm definitely happy with this purchase!


As Dave says, why brine a pork butt?! There really is no need, and
absolutely no advantage to brining that cut of meat! Save brining for
poultry and the occasional fish!

Also, 6 hours seems like a very small amount of time to smoke a pork
butt, w/o knowing how much it weighed originally. If it weighed the
usual 9-12 or more pounds, 6 hours smoking time seems like a good
start, but not much else. How did you finish it in such a short time?!
What was the internal temp? Anything less than 190F was not enough, if
making pulled pork. Did you pull it, or slice it?
Don't sweat the responses- they are just from people who have been
there, and done that! We're not giving you a hard time- we're just
trying to save you some trouble and heartache, and trying to help you
make better bbq! Nothing personal! Good luck in your future endeavors!
Hang in there, and soon, you'll be giving "newbies" the same advice
you're getting now!
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Old 30-03-2008, 01:53 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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JimnGin wrote:
On Mar 29, 9:33 pm, Walt Fles wrote:
I brined a pork shoulder roast overnight to prepare for smoking.
I spent about 6 hours smoking with royal oak lump and some mesquite chunks.

It turned out quite good - not too salty form the brine but you could
taste it a bit. A definite smoke ring, good flavor, and a nice juicy cut
of meat.

I'm definitely happy with this purchase!


As Dave says, why brine a pork butt?! There really is no need, and
absolutely no advantage to brining that cut of meat! Save brining for
poultry and the occasional fish!

Also, 6 hours seems like a very small amount of time to smoke a pork
butt, w/o knowing how much it weighed originally. If it weighed the
usual 9-12 or more pounds, 6 hours smoking time seems like a good
start, but not much else. How did you finish it in such a short time?!
What was the internal temp? Anything less than 190F was not enough, if
making pulled pork. Did you pull it, or slice it?
Don't sweat the responses- they are just from people who have been
there, and done that! We're not giving you a hard time- we're just
trying to save you some trouble and heartache, and trying to help you
make better bbq! Nothing personal! Good luck in your future endeavors!
Hang in there, and soon, you'll be giving "newbies" the same advice
you're getting now!

It was 6 pounds, and the brine added some nice moisture and actually
the brown sugar and molasses penetrated it and left a dark ring in the
middle of it. overall it turned out quite well.
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Old 30-03-2008, 02:06 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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"Dave Bugg" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
Walt Fles wrote:
I brined a pork shoulder roast overnight to prepare for smoking.


Why?

--
Dave
www.davebbq.com


Exactly my thought. The only piece of pork that may benefit from brining is
a hunk of loin. It has little fat. I don't believe I have ever brined a
piece of pork.
I don't like starting day before yesterday to cook a piece of pork.
I usually just open the package, sprinkle on my rub and cook.
--
James A. "Big Jim" Whitten

www.lazyq.com




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Old 30-03-2008, 04:09 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Walt Fles wrote:

It was 6 pounds, and the brine added some nice moisture and actually
the brown sugar and molasses penetrated it and left a dark ring in the
middle of it. overall it turned out quite well.


Well, whatever makes you happy but I'm also in the "why?"
corner. Now that you have a "control", I'd suggest just
rubbing the next one and cooking. I doubt if you'll see much
benefit to brining after that. But hey, you're cookin' it,
if it makes you happy - do it. ;-)

--
Steve
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Old 30-03-2008, 05:20 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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On Mar 30, 8:09*am, Steve Calvin wrote:
Walt Fles wrote:
It was 6 pounds, and the brine added some nice moisture


And you know that because you've cooked a few that weren't brined?
That cut of meat has so much excess fat and moisture that we cook it
for hours at a time getting rid of it all to make it edible.
Moisture is NOT a problem with butts.

As Calvin said though, it's your time and money. Do as you please.
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Old 30-03-2008, 05:54 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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JimnGin wrote:

On Mar 29, 9:33 pm, Walt Fles wrote:
I brined a pork shoulder roast overnight to prepare for smoking.
I spent about 6 hours smoking with royal oak lump and some mesquite chunks.

It turned out quite good - not too salty form the brine but you could
taste it a bit. A definite smoke ring, good flavor, and a nice juicy cut
of meat.

I'm definitely happy with this purchase!


As Dave says, why brine a pork butt?! There really is no need, and
absolutely no advantage to brining that cut of meat!


Try it, and you'll find you may like it. I've done several that way
and it's a nice change of pace.

Nothing wrong with that. It's not against any laws far as I know.
Not sure why everybody is against it. True, it doesn't need it, but
it can benefit from it, especially if you're tired of the some 'ol
pork.

-sw
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Old 30-03-2008, 09:11 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Big Jim wrote:
"Dave Bugg" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
Walt Fles wrote:
I brined a pork shoulder roast overnight to prepare for smoking.


Why?

--
Dave
www.davebbq.com


Exactly my thought. The only piece of pork that may benefit from
brining is a hunk of loin. It has little fat. I don't believe I have
ever brined a piece of pork.


Yeah. It would have to be a real lean cut, and even then I'd probably grill
it or roast it so a long cooking wouldn't dry it out.

I don't like starting day before yesterday to cook a piece of pork.
I usually just open the package, sprinkle on my rub and cook.


Amen.

--
Dave
"A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects."


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Old 30-03-2008, 09:15 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Walt Fles wrote:

It was 6 pounds, and the brine added some nice moisture and actually
the brown sugar and molasses penetrated it and left a dark ring in the
middle of it. overall it turned out quite well.


A butt has a lot of moisture which is increased with the cooking as the
collagen breaks down. Now don't get me wrong, I'm not criticizing you. I was
just trying to figure out if you knew that brining a shoulder or butt for
bbq just isn't necessary.

--
Dave
www.davebbq.com




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Old 30-03-2008, 09:26 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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On Mar 30, 9:54*am, Sqwertz wrote:


Not sure why everybody is against it.


I don't think anyone is against it, but we're simply saying what you
said he

*True, it doesn't need it,


And letting him know that moistness is not a particularly good reason
to brine this cut o meat.

but
it can benefit from it, especially if you're tired of the some 'ol
pork.


That makes sense to me. It doesn't make as much sense to do on your
very first cook, that's all. And then think it helped keep the meat
moist.


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Old 31-03-2008, 08:14 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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On Mar 30, 8:37 am, "Nunya Bidnits" wrote:

Here's something to try in your recipe: Smoked (Spanish) Paprika. I have
seen smoked Paprika sold both with and without the "Spanish" designation. It
adds a dimension of smoke flavor to rubs and sauces, and in my opinion,
where a recipe calls for "liquid smoke", tastes much better and more natural.


I was visiting in Houston about a month ago, and went to Penzeys's
where they have the sample spices in large jars for you to take a
whiff. The smoke Spanish and Hungarian paprikas they had there were
beyond description they smelled so good. Nothing like the stuff in
the bottles I had that made me not like smoked paprika.

Marty, here's something to try. Next time you put a butt on, get a
couple of handfuls of jalapenos, core them, remove the ribs and the
seeds if you don't want too much heat. Smoke them with your butt
until they are almost crispy. Give them a good grind, and put that in
a shaker.

It is good for everything from baked potatoes, popcorn to soup. The
japs really take the smoke well.

Robert




Chilpotle powder, being dried and smoked jalapeno, will also give
smoke flavor but adds quite a bit of heat as well.

MartyB in KC


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Old 31-03-2008, 09:43 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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On Mar 31, 3:14 am, "
wrote:
On Mar 30, 8:37 am, "Nunya Bidnits" wrote:


I was visiting in Houston about a month ago, and went to Penzeys's
where they have the sample spices in large jars for you to take a
whiff. The smoke Spanish and Hungarian paprikas they had there were
beyond description they smelled so good. Nothing like the stuff in
the bottles I had that made me not like smoked paprika.



Penzey's is to spices what smokers are to meat!! I second the nod to
Penzey's! There is a new retail location that opened recently, and is
only 45 minutes to an hour from us. I am low on many of my Penzey's
items, and am looking forward to the trip to that location in the very
near future! I've used their spices, herbs, mixes, etc, for years for
baking, cooking, and smoking. Not too long ago, I made the best chili
the wife and I have ever had using several of their ground and dried
chilies!

JImnGin
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Old 31-03-2008, 05:54 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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On Mar 30, 3:15 pm, "Dave Bugg" wrote:
Walt Fles wrote:
It was 6 pounds, and the brine added some nice moisture and actually
the brown sugar and molasses penetrated it and left a dark ring in the
middle of it. overall it turned out quite well.


A butt has a lot of moisture which is increased with the cooking as the
collagen breaks down. Now don't get me wrong, I'm not criticizing you. I was
just trying to figure out if you knew that brining a shoulder or butt for
bbq just isn't necessary.

--
Davewww.davebbq.com


OK thanks for your input. One thing though I did notice was that my
old thermometer for some reason
(maybe since it should not be immersed one of my unknowing children
washed it in the sink) was not
working, and when I went to the store to get some other food to have
with dinner I picked up another
grill/oven safe meat thermometer. The shoulder was done much sooner
than I expected, so therefore I
think it cooked a bit quicker than I thought it would. The bone
pulled out fairly easily but the meat did not
shred (pulled) as I hoped it would have. I'm just learning how to
regulate the heat on this grill/smoker but
I'm certain the next times will be much closer to perfection.
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Old 31-03-2008, 11:42 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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On Mar 31, 9:02 am, "Nunya Bidnits" wrote:


You're making chipotle! Are you using red ripened japs? That's the only way
I've done it.


Sadly, the red ripened ones have another home. I eat them with
sandwiches, or save the big ones and grill them in halves after
stuffing with cream cheese seafood dip. The red ones are a little
sweeter and seem to have a more gentle heat to them. So some of them
go into salsas for color as well as tasted.

Flavor would be different using unripened japs.


Oh, yeah. The green peppers have a much sharper flavor, no sweetness.

Take a handful of the peppers while dark green and just starting to
turn and smoke them to almost dry. I make mine the way one of our
local pepper purveyors does, and he brands his "Texas Gunpowder". I
wash the peppers, cut the stem end off to allow the moisture to escape
and dry and grind the whole peppers seeds and all.

When you smoke them green, they have a really different taste, and it
is much more pungent. I like to smoke mine over local oak wood with a
piece or two of mesquite thrown in. They will be VERY pungent and
smoky. For a change, I just cut them into slices and put them on a
non stick surface and let the little wheels smoke. These are really
great in bowl of Texas red.


When my garden
gets going I let the jalapenos ripen because they taste better and I smoke
'em. Most people are familiar with chipotle only the way its usually sold in
stores, in a can, packed in adobo sauce. Those are tasty, and nicely hot,
but not the same as straight chipotle, obviously.


Those little cans aren't very popular around here. Most, but not all
of the folks that are serious about traditional cooking smoke their
own and do not want all the sauce with its tomato, vinegar and spices
in it along with the chilies.

Interesting to me and a few of my amigos that prefer the traditional
ways is the fact that when you search for recipes to make your own
chipotles, the almost always include the adobo sauce. They also tell
you to use dried peppers to smoke! Wrong - not if you want a
traditional chipotle.

It's raining here so no work for me, so a little more info with your
coffee.

Chipotles were originally dried and smoked for preservation purposes.
In many places in Mexico it is still the same, with fresh japs put in
the smoker and dried much like jerky with the same aim in mind. Our
fair city is full of latinos (69% !) and has been a gateway from
Mexico for many decades. It was only natural that the traditional
methods of the homeland came over there with the immigrants, and
traditionally smoked chipotles were part of those methods.

So around here, only recently were the smoked peppers in adobo called
"chipotles". They were called "smoked peppers in adobo" until all
those cooking shows found a couple of brands with "chipotle" on their
cans. I have even found recipes on the net for making homemade
chipotles using the pickled japs (escabeche style) as the peppers!
Why would you smoke a pickled pepper?

Folks around here go for the heat and not for the other flavors. For
example; say you made a pot of beans, and want that smoky pepper spice
in it. You don't get a can of peppers in adobo, you go to the
cabinet and get your bottle of lightly ground smoked japs and use it.
No vinegar, tomato or anything else is added to the beans. Just a
little heat and smoke.

For sauces etc. where I need a larger amount I can get chipotle powder and
sometimes whole chipotle from Planters Seed Co.http://plantersseed.com/


I haven't seen them before. How is their ground chipotle? Smoky?
Smoky enough that you don't lose the punch in a recipe?

The prices don't look bad if they are a good product.

Thanks for the link!

Robert


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