Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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Old 28-12-2005, 10:07 AM posted to rec.food.baking
Paul Giverin
 
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Default Shortcrust pastry question

I've just received "The Silver Spoon" as a Xmas gift. Its the
translation of a famous Italian cook book with over 2000 recipes and I'm
really pleased with it. Its a weighty book and there are some fantastic
looking recipes in it.

However, I was looking at baking a walnut and honey tart today from a
recipe in this book but I'm confused as to the method it uses to make
shortcrust pastry. I've always understood that you had to "rub in" the
butter into the flour until the mixture resembles breadcrumbs. The
recipe for shortcrust pastry in my new book just says mix the flour and
butter together, along with the sugar and egg yolk.

Surely the butter won't get properly incorporated into the flour using
this method? I'll probably make my pastry using the rubbing in method I
know works for me but I'm curious to know if this other, quicker method
would give as good results?

Cheers,

--
Paul Giverin

British Jet Engine Website http://www.britjet.co.uk

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Old 28-12-2005, 02:29 PM posted to rec.food.baking
Vox Humana
 
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Default Shortcrust pastry question


"Paul Giverin" wrote in message
...
I've just received "The Silver Spoon" as a Xmas gift. Its the
translation of a famous Italian cook book with over 2000 recipes and I'm
really pleased with it. Its a weighty book and there are some fantastic
looking recipes in it.

However, I was looking at baking a walnut and honey tart today from a
recipe in this book but I'm confused as to the method it uses to make
shortcrust pastry. I've always understood that you had to "rub in" the
butter into the flour until the mixture resembles breadcrumbs. The
recipe for shortcrust pastry in my new book just says mix the flour and
butter together, along with the sugar and egg yolk.

Surely the butter won't get properly incorporated into the flour using
this method? I'll probably make my pastry using the rubbing in method I
know works for me but I'm curious to know if this other, quicker method
would give as good results?


I would rub or cut the butter into the flour.


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Old 29-12-2005, 09:28 PM posted to rec.food.baking
Paul Giverin
 
Posts: n/a
Default Shortcrust pastry question

In message , Vox Humana
writes

"Paul Giverin" wrote in message
...

However, I was looking at baking a walnut and honey tart today from a
recipe in this book but I'm confused as to the method it uses to make
shortcrust pastry. I've always understood that you had to "rub in" the
butter into the flour until the mixture resembles breadcrumbs. The
recipe for shortcrust pastry in my new book just says mix the flour and
butter together, along with the sugar and egg yolk.

Surely the butter won't get properly incorporated into the flour using
this method? I'll probably make my pastry using the rubbing in method I
know works for me but I'm curious to know if this other, quicker method
would give as good results?


I would rub or cut the butter into the flour.


Thanks. I rubbed in the butter as per my normal method and it was fine.

If I were mix the flour and butter in a food processor, would that give
the same results?

--
Paul Giverin

British Jet Engine Website http://www.britjet.co.uk
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Old 29-12-2005, 10:33 PM posted to rec.food.baking
Reg
 
Posts: n/a
Default Shortcrust pastry question

Paul Giverin wrote:

Thanks. I rubbed in the butter as per my normal method and it was fine.

If I were mix the flour and butter in a food processor, would that give
the same results?



Yes. I find it's a bit faster than doing it by hand. For
a flaky pate brisee (ie. with big hunks of unmixed fat left
in it) I load the bowl with flour and butter and stick
the whole thing in the freezer to get it cold. It
then takes half a minute or so to mix.

--
Reg email: RegForte (at) (that free MS email service) (dot) com

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Old 29-12-2005, 10:34 PM posted to rec.food.baking
Vox Humana
 
Posts: n/a
Default Shortcrust pastry question


"Paul Giverin" wrote in message
...
In message , Vox Humana
writes

"Paul Giverin" wrote in message
...

However, I was looking at baking a walnut and honey tart today from a
recipe in this book but I'm confused as to the method it uses to make
shortcrust pastry. I've always understood that you had to "rub in" the
butter into the flour until the mixture resembles breadcrumbs. The
recipe for shortcrust pastry in my new book just says mix the flour and
butter together, along with the sugar and egg yolk.

Surely the butter won't get properly incorporated into the flour using
this method? I'll probably make my pastry using the rubbing in method I
know works for me but I'm curious to know if this other, quicker method
would give as good results?


I would rub or cut the butter into the flour.


Thanks. I rubbed in the butter as per my normal method and it was fine.

If I were mix the flour and butter in a food processor, would that give
the same results?


That's how I would do it. I use my FP for short dough like pie pastry. It
does a great job when the butter is very cold.




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Old 30-12-2005, 09:09 AM posted to rec.food.baking
Paul Giverin
 
Posts: n/a
Default Shortcrust pastry question

In message , Vox Humana
writes

"Paul Giverin" wrote in message
...

If I were mix the flour and butter in a food processor, would that give
the same results?


That's how I would do it. I use my FP for short dough like pie pastry. It
does a great job when the butter is very cold.


Thanks, I'll give that a try next time.

--
Paul Giverin

British Jet Engine Website http://www.britjet.co.uk
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Old 30-12-2005, 09:11 AM posted to rec.food.baking
Paul Giverin
 
Posts: n/a
Default Shortcrust pastry question

In message , Reg
writes
Paul Giverin wrote:

Thanks. I rubbed in the butter as per my normal method and it was fine.
If I were mix the flour and butter in a food processor, would that
give the same results?



Yes. I find it's a bit faster than doing it by hand. For
a flaky pate brisee (ie. with big hunks of unmixed fat left
in it) I load the bowl with flour and butter and stick
the whole thing in the freezer to get it cold. It
then takes half a minute or so to mix.

I'll give it a go. Nothing ventured, nothing gained etc.

Cheers,

--
Paul Giverin

British Jet Engine Website http://www.britjet.co.uk
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Old 30-12-2005, 02:27 PM posted to rec.food.baking
Vox Humana
 
Posts: n/a
Default Shortcrust pastry question


"Paul Giverin" wrote in message
...
In message , Vox Humana
writes

"Paul Giverin" wrote in message
...

If I were mix the flour and butter in a food processor, would that give
the same results?


That's how I would do it. I use my FP for short dough like pie pastry.

It
does a great job when the butter is very cold.


Thanks, I'll give that a try next time.


I generally keep my butter in the freezer. I cut it into small pieces while
it is still frozen or still very cold, and then use the FP to cut them into
the flour. It only takes 5 - 10 pulses.




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