Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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Old 04-10-2008, 05:19 PM posted to rec.food.cooking,rec.food.baking
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Default Need help translating British flour names in to American

I ran ran across a couple of quick bread recipes in the Guardian that
I'd like to try, but I'm not certain how the British names for the
various flours translate into what I can buy at my American
supermarket.

If some kind person in the UK could describe what the flours are, I'll
take it from there.

Wholemeal self-raising flour
Medium oatmeal
Strong brown flour

TIA!

- Mark

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Old 04-10-2008, 06:46 PM posted to rec.food.cooking,rec.food.baking
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Default Need help translating British flour names in to American

Mark A.Meggs wrote:
I ran ran across a couple of quick bread recipes in the Guardian that
I'd like to try, but I'm not certain how the British names for the
various flours translate into what I can buy at my American
supermarket.

If some kind person in the UK could describe what the flours are, I'll
take it from there.

Wholemeal self-raising flour

http://www.allinsonflour.co.uk/produ...ing-flour.aspx

Medium oatmeal


http://www.goodnessdirect.co.uk/cgi-...dium__3kg.html

or
http://tinyurl.com/3m92to

See the picture as you open it.

Strong brown flour


http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/A2198586

HTH


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Old 04-10-2008, 08:28 PM posted to rec.food.cooking,rec.food.baking
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Default Need help translating British flour names in to American

On Sat, 4 Oct 2008 18:46:33 +0100, "Ophelia"
wrote:

Mark A.Meggs wrote:
I ran ran across a couple of quick bread recipes in the Guardian that
I'd like to try, but I'm not certain how the British names for the
various flours translate into what I can buy at my American
supermarket.

If some kind person in the UK could describe what the flours are, I'll
take it from there.

Wholemeal self-raising flour

http://www.allinsonflour.co.uk/produ...ing-flour.aspx


I don't think this is available in the states. Whole-wheat flour
isn't a problem. But the only self-rising flours I'm aware of are
either "regular" white flour or corn (maize) meal mixes.

I'll have to add some baking soda or baking powder.

Medium oatmeal


http://www.goodnessdirect.co.uk/cgi-...dium__3kg.html

or
http://tinyurl.com/3m92to

See the picture as you open it.


May not be available. Most American oats are "rolled" oats. Steel-cut
oats are easy to find, but I don't think I've ever seen ground oats.

Strong brown flour


http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/A2198586


Not a problem - high-gluten flour should be easy to find.

HTH


Thanks!

- Mark
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Old 04-10-2008, 08:39 PM posted to rec.food.cooking,rec.food.baking
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Default Need help translating British flour names in to American

Mark A.Meggs wrote:
On Sat, 4 Oct 2008 18:46:33 +0100, "Ophelia"
wrote:

Mark A.Meggs wrote:
I ran ran across a couple of quick bread recipes in the Guardian
that I'd like to try, but I'm not certain how the British names for
the various flours translate into what I can buy at my American
supermarket.

If some kind person in the UK could describe what the flours are,
I'll take it from there.

Wholemeal self-raising flour

http://www.allinsonflour.co.uk/produ...ing-flour.aspx


I don't think this is available in the states. Whole-wheat flour
isn't a problem. But the only self-rising flours I'm aware of are
either "regular" white flour or corn (maize) meal mixes.

I'll have to add some baking soda or baking powder.


Yes you can. Just be sure that the flour isn't 'strong' ie high protein.


Medium oatmeal


http://www.goodnessdirect.co.uk/cgi-...dium__3kg.html

or
http://tinyurl.com/3m92to

See the picture as you open it.


May not be available. Most American oats are "rolled" oats. Steel-cut
oats are easy to find, but I don't think I've ever seen ground oats.


I think you will find rolled are ok. Experiment with it.



Strong brown flour


http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/A2198586


Not a problem - high-gluten flour should be easy to find.

HTH


Thanks!


My pleasure!


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Old 04-10-2008, 11:55 PM posted to rec.food.cooking,rec.food.baking
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Default Need help translating British flour names in to American

Mark A.Meggs wrote:

May not be available. Most American oats are "rolled" oats. Steel-cut
oats are easy to find, but I don't think I've ever seen ground oats.



Quaker Oats makes rolled oats which are called "old fashioned." They
also make "quick 1-minute" oats which are rolled oats that have been
chopped a bit. I use them in oatmeal cookies. If you take either one
and spin it in a food processor with a steel blade for a while, you get
ground oats or oat flour. I use it all the time in baking. I like the
flavor.


--Lia



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Old 05-10-2008, 12:04 AM posted to rec.food.cooking,rec.food.baking
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Default Need help translating British flour names in to American


"Ophelia" wrote in message
...
Mark A.Meggs wrote:
On Sat, 4 Oct 2008 18:46:33 +0100, "Ophelia"
wrote:

Mark A.Meggs wrote:
I ran ran across a couple of quick bread recipes in the Guardian
that I'd like to try, but I'm not certain how the British names for
the various flours translate into what I can buy at my American
supermarket.

If some kind person in the UK could describe what the flours are,
I'll take it from there.

Wholemeal self-raising flour
http://www.allinsonflour.co.uk/produ...ing-flour.aspx


I don't think this is available in the states. Whole-wheat flour
isn't a problem. But the only self-rising flours I'm aware of are
either "regular" white flour or corn (maize) meal mixes.

I'll have to add some baking soda or baking powder.


Yes you can. Just be sure that the flour isn't 'strong' ie high protein.

Most recipes call for 1tsp baking powder per cup of AP flour (or 4tsp per
pound) plus a 1/4tsp salt.
However, AP flour in Canada and the northern US is quite high in protein and
makes good bread. It is also (I think) higher in protein than UK plain
flour. Therefore, I would be inclined to use cake and pastry flour or a
blend of C&P with AP. Why the salt is added I don't know but it seems
unnecessary and when I made this flour many moons ago, I left it out.
Perhaps Ophelia can help me out here! SR flour is readily available in
Canadian supermarkets.
Graham


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Old 05-10-2008, 12:20 AM posted to rec.food.cooking,rec.food.baking
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Default Need help translating British flour names in to American

On Sat, 04 Oct 2008 18:55:25 -0400, Julia Altshuler
wrote:

Mark A.Meggs wrote:

May not be available. Most American oats are "rolled" oats. Steel-cut
oats are easy to find, but I don't think I've ever seen ground oats.



Quaker Oats makes rolled oats which are called "old fashioned." They
also make "quick 1-minute" oats which are rolled oats that have been
chopped a bit. I use them in oatmeal cookies. If you take either one
and spin it in a food processor with a steel blade for a while, you get
ground oats or oat flour. I use it all the time in baking. I like the
flavor.


--Lia


Thanks Lia,

I'm going to have to experiment. The picture in the link shows what
looks to me to be coarsely ground whole oats - oat grain ground in a
mill with steel burrs or stones. Rolled oats are run between 2
closely spaced steel rollers and flattened into the flakey stuff that
we call oatmeal.

I don't know what effect the difference will have on the final
product. The quick bread in question is Scottish bannock - similar in
concept to American johnnycake.

- Mark
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Old 05-10-2008, 10:55 AM posted to rec.food.cooking,rec.food.baking
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Default Need help translating British flour names in to American

Mark A.Meggs wrote:
On Sat, 04 Oct 2008 18:55:25 -0400, Julia Altshuler
wrote:

Mark A.Meggs wrote:

May not be available. Most American oats are "rolled" oats.
Steel-cut oats are easy to find, but I don't think I've ever seen
ground oats.



Quaker Oats makes rolled oats which are called "old fashioned." They
also make "quick 1-minute" oats which are rolled oats that have been
chopped a bit. I use them in oatmeal cookies. If you take either
one and spin it in a food processor with a steel blade for a while,
you get ground oats or oat flour. I use it all the time in baking.
I like the flavor.


--Lia


Thanks Lia,

I'm going to have to experiment. The picture in the link shows what
looks to me to be coarsely ground whole oats - oat grain ground in a
mill with steel burrs or stones. Rolled oats are run between 2
closely spaced steel rollers and flattened into the flakey stuff that
we call oatmeal.

I don't know what effect the difference will have on the final
product. The quick bread in question is Scottish bannock - similar in
concept to American johnnycake.


Lia's advice is good


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Old 05-10-2008, 10:59 AM posted to rec.food.cooking,rec.food.baking
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Default Need help translating British flour names in to American

Graham wrote:
"Ophelia" wrote in message
...
Mark A.Meggs wrote:
On Sat, 4 Oct 2008 18:46:33 +0100, "Ophelia"
wrote:

Mark A.Meggs wrote:
I ran ran across a couple of quick bread recipes in the Guardian
that I'd like to try, but I'm not certain how the British names
for the various flours translate into what I can buy at my
American supermarket.

If some kind person in the UK could describe what the flours are,
I'll take it from there.

Wholemeal self-raising flour
http://www.allinsonflour.co.uk/produ...ing-flour.aspx


I don't think this is available in the states. Whole-wheat flour
isn't a problem. But the only self-rising flours I'm aware of are
either "regular" white flour or corn (maize) meal mixes.

I'll have to add some baking soda or baking powder.


Yes you can. Just be sure that the flour isn't 'strong' ie high
protein.

Most recipes call for 1tsp baking powder per cup of AP flour (or 4tsp
per pound) plus a 1/4tsp salt.
However, AP flour in Canada and the northern US is quite high in
protein and makes good bread. It is also (I think) higher in protein
than UK plain flour. Therefore, I would be inclined to use cake and
pastry flour or a blend of C&P with AP. Why the salt is added I
don't know but it seems unnecessary and when I made this flour many
moons ago, I left it out. Perhaps Ophelia can help me out here! SR
flour is readily available in Canadian supermarkets.
Graham


http://southernfood.about.com/cs/bre...rise_flour.htm


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Old 05-10-2008, 03:25 PM posted to rec.food.cooking,rec.food.baking
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Default Need help translating British flour names in to American


"Ophelia" wrote in message
...
Graham wrote:
"Ophelia" wrote in message
...
Mark A.Meggs wrote:
On Sat, 4 Oct 2008 18:46:33 +0100, "Ophelia"
wrote:

Mark A.Meggs wrote:
I ran ran across a couple of quick bread recipes in the Guardian
that I'd like to try, but I'm not certain how the British names
for the various flours translate into what I can buy at my
American supermarket.

If some kind person in the UK could describe what the flours are,
I'll take it from there.

Wholemeal self-raising flour
http://www.allinsonflour.co.uk/produ...ing-flour.aspx


I don't think this is available in the states. Whole-wheat flour
isn't a problem. But the only self-rising flours I'm aware of are
either "regular" white flour or corn (maize) meal mixes.

I'll have to add some baking soda or baking powder.

Yes you can. Just be sure that the flour isn't 'strong' ie high
protein.

Most recipes call for 1tsp baking powder per cup of AP flour (or 4tsp
per pound) plus a 1/4tsp salt.
However, AP flour in Canada and the northern US is quite high in
protein and makes good bread. It is also (I think) higher in protein
than UK plain flour. Therefore, I would be inclined to use cake and
pastry flour or a blend of C&P with AP. Why the salt is added I
don't know but it seems unnecessary and when I made this flour many
moons ago, I left it out. Perhaps Ophelia can help me out here! SR
flour is readily available in Canadian supermarkets.
Graham


http://southernfood.about.com/cs/bre...rise_flour.htm

Yes, O, but why the salt?
Graham




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Old 05-10-2008, 09:25 PM posted to rec.food.cooking,rec.food.baking
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Default Need help translating British flour names in to American

Graham wrote:
"Ophelia" wrote in message
...
Graham wrote:
"Ophelia" wrote in message
...
Mark A.Meggs wrote:
On Sat, 4 Oct 2008 18:46:33 +0100, "Ophelia"
wrote:

Mark A.Meggs wrote:
I ran ran across a couple of quick bread recipes in the Guardian
that I'd like to try, but I'm not certain how the British names
for the various flours translate into what I can buy at my
American supermarket.

If some kind person in the UK could describe what the flours
are, I'll take it from there.

Wholemeal self-raising flour
http://www.allinsonflour.co.uk/produ...ing-flour.aspx


I don't think this is available in the states. Whole-wheat flour
isn't a problem. But the only self-rising flours I'm aware of are
either "regular" white flour or corn (maize) meal mixes.

I'll have to add some baking soda or baking powder.

Yes you can. Just be sure that the flour isn't 'strong' ie high
protein.
Most recipes call for 1tsp baking powder per cup of AP flour (or
4tsp per pound) plus a 1/4tsp salt.
However, AP flour in Canada and the northern US is quite high in
protein and makes good bread. It is also (I think) higher in
protein than UK plain flour. Therefore, I would be inclined to
use cake and pastry flour or a blend of C&P with AP. Why the salt
is added I don't know but it seems unnecessary and when I made this
flour many moons ago, I left it out. Perhaps Ophelia can help me
out here! SR flour is readily available in Canadian supermarkets.
Graham


http://southernfood.about.com/cs/bre...rise_flour.htm

Yes, O, but why the salt


I don't use salt anyway, I use something called Lo Salt. It worked the
same))




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