Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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Old 14-12-2006, 08:57 PM posted to rec.food.baking
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Default Batter vs. Dough At what point does a batter become a dough or does a dough become a batter?

I have a dough formula that I want to convert into a batter. By using the
"Baker's Percentage," my water is about 78% of the weight of the flour.
That's a pretty wet and sticky dough already. At what point does it become
a batter? 100% water? Is there any consensus? One of my baking classmates
told me that if it can be poured, it's a batter. That doesn't sound very
scientific. Ideas?

Thanks.

Rich Hollenbeck
Moreno Valley, CA USA




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Old 14-12-2006, 11:29 PM posted to rec.food.baking
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Default Batter vs. Dough At what point does a batter become a dough or does a dough become a batter?

Oh pshaw, on Thu 14 Dec 2006 12:57:24p, Richard Hollenbeck meant to say...

I have a dough formula that I want to convert into a batter. By using
the "Baker's Percentage," my water is about 78% of the weight of the
flour. That's a pretty wet and sticky dough already. At what point does
it become a batter? 100% water? Is there any consensus? One of my
baking classmates told me that if it can be poured, it's a batter. That
doesn't sound very scientific. Ideas?


LOL! It may not sound very scientific, but it makes perfect sense. The
primary difference between dough and batter is the consistency - Dough is
thicker and must be molded by hand, while batter is semi-liquid, thus spooned
or poured. Both can be leavened with either yeast, baking power, or baking
soda.

--
Wayne Boatwright
__________________________________________________

One thing about pain: It proves you're alive.

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Old 15-12-2006, 01:31 AM posted to rec.food.baking
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Default Batter vs. Dough At what point does a batter become a dough or does a dough become a batter?

Thanks to both of you. I simply kicked up the hydration to 122% without
changing any of the other ingredients' ratios and it did the trick. You can
refer to another post I made today about English muffins. I found that
making the dough into a batter and pouring the batter into biscuit-cutting
rings gave me the characteristic big bubbles I was seeking.

"yetanotherBob" wrote in message
...
In article [email protected],
says...
I have a dough formula that I want to convert into a batter. By using
the
"Baker's Percentage," my water is about 78% of the weight of the flour.
That's a pretty wet and sticky dough already. At what point does it
become
a batter? 100% water? Is there any consensus? One of my baking
classmates
told me that if it can be poured, it's a batter. That doesn't sound very
scientific. Ideas?

Thanks.

Rich Hollenbeck
Moreno Valley, CA USA

I'll go along with your classmate. What's scientific about the terms
"dough" and "batter" to begin with?

In another context, it's stepping up to the plate that makes a batter a
batter. Having done that, if he can hit, he makes dough.

Bob ;-)





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