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General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

quiche problems - again!!



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 04-09-2006, 09:27 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 2,383
Default quiche problems - again!!

On Mon, 04 Sep 2006 08:29:36 GMT, "Jen"
wrote:

What causes a quiche to develop lots of liquid when it's cooked? I tried to
make small crustless quiches in a muffin pan. But it didn't hold together
too well, and there was quite a bit of liquid. I used 1 egg, 1 slice bacon,
and 1/2 cup milk.


That's a lot of milk for one egg, I think. I use a total of 1 cup of
(milk, cream, sour cream, whatever) for a three- or four-egg quiche.

serene
--
My blog: http://serenejournal.livejournal.com
My cooking blog: http://serenecooking.livejournal.com
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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 04-09-2006, 09:29 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 377
Default quiche problems - again!!

What causes a quiche to develop lots of liquid when it's cooked? I tried to
make small crustless quiches in a muffin pan. But it didn't hold together
too well, and there was quite a bit of liquid. I used 1 egg, 1 slice bacon,
and 1/2 cup milk.

Thanks.

Jen


  #3 (permalink)  
Old 04-09-2006, 09:30 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 413
Default quiche problems - again!!

Jen did you cook the bacon first?
were there any other ingredients - like vegetables - which could
account for the excess liquid?

LadyJane
--
'Never trust a skinny cook!'

  #4 (permalink)  
Old 04-09-2006, 09:42 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 4,620
Default quiche problems - again!!

Oh pshaw, on Mon 04 Sep 2006 01:27:32a, Serene meant to say...

On Mon, 04 Sep 2006 08:29:36 GMT, "Jen"
wrote:

What causes a quiche to develop lots of liquid when it's cooked? I
tried to make small crustless quiches in a muffin pan. But it didn't
hold together too well, and there was quite a bit of liquid. I used 1
egg, 1 slice bacon, and 1/2 cup milk.


That's a lot of milk for one egg, I think. I use a total of 1 cup of
(milk, cream, sour cream, whatever) for a three- or four-egg quiche.

serene


What Serene said, and also possibly over-baking. Custards, including
quiches, can separate when overheated or baked too long.

--
Wayne Boatwright
__________________________________________________

Cats must groom Daddy at 2 am.

  #5 (permalink)  
Old 04-09-2006, 09:44 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 10,656
Default quiche problems - again!!

On 2006-09-04, Jen wrote:

too well, and there was quite a bit of liquid. I used 1 egg, 1 slice bacon,
and 1/2 cup milk.


Did you use any veggies? Veggies like mushrooms, asparagus, onions,
etc, need to to be sauteed or grilled or whatever to drive most of the
moisture. You're other problem is using milk. Milk is mostly water.
Use cream instead. At the very least, use half n' half, but not milk.

nb
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 04-09-2006, 10:09 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 377
Default quiche problems - again!!


"LadyJane" wrote in message
oups.com...
Jen did you cook the bacon first?
were there any other ingredients - like vegetables - which could
account for the excess liquid?


I did cook the bacon first. There was nothing else in it, just a basic egg
and bacon one.

Jen


  #7 (permalink)  
Old 04-09-2006, 10:11 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 377
Default quiche problems - again!!


"notbob" wrote in message
. ..
On 2006-09-04, Jen wrote:

too well, and there was quite a bit of liquid. I used 1 egg, 1 slice
bacon,
and 1/2 cup milk.


Did you use any veggies? Veggies like mushrooms, asparagus, onions,
etc, need to to be sauteed or grilled or whatever to drive most of the
moisture. You're other problem is using milk. Milk is mostly water.
Use cream instead. At the very least, use half n' half, but not milk.



No vegies. I didn't have any cream, but I always have milk. Maybe I'll try
less milk next time.

Thanks.

Jen


  #8 (permalink)  
Old 04-09-2006, 10:14 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 377
Default quiche problems - again!!


"Serene" wrote in message
news
On Mon, 04 Sep 2006 08:29:36 GMT, "Jen"
wrote:

What causes a quiche to develop lots of liquid when it's cooked? I tried
to
make small crustless quiches in a muffin pan. But it didn't hold together
too well, and there was quite a bit of liquid. I used 1 egg, 1 slice
bacon,
and 1/2 cup milk.


That's a lot of milk for one egg, I think. I use a total of 1 cup of
(milk, cream, sour cream, whatever) for a three- or four-egg quiche.



I made a quiche with 4 eggs, and 2 cups of milk a while ago (although I
might have used part cream). It turned out great. Obviously it's not too
bad with cream, but I should use less if I use milk.

Thanks.

Jen


  #9 (permalink)  
Old 04-09-2006, 11:42 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 11,042
Default quiche problems - again!!

Jen replied:

Did you use any veggies? Veggies like mushrooms, asparagus, onions,
etc, need to to be sauteed or grilled or whatever to drive most of the
moisture. You're other problem is using milk. Milk is mostly water.
Use cream instead. At the very least, use half n' half, but not milk.


No vegies. I didn't have any cream, but I always have milk. Maybe I'll
try less milk next time.


It just so happens that Cooks Illustrated tackled this exact problem last
year (and I just got around to reading about it yesterday -- I get their
end-of-the-year hardbound compilation of the year's magazines).

Their testing agreed with what notbob said: Although eggs and milk work fine
in the absence of any other ingredients, the second you add anything else,
the milk becomes a problem. Decreasing the amount of milk didn't solve the
problem, because then the eggs became rubbery (and there was still a problem
with excess liquid). The CI solution was to use half-and-half.

Bob


  #10 (permalink)  
Old 04-09-2006, 01:03 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 6,727
Default quiche problems - again!!

Jen wrote:
What causes a quiche to develop lots of liquid when it's cooked? I
tried to make small crustless quiches in a muffin pan. But it didn't
hold together too well, and there was quite a bit of liquid. I used
1 egg, 1 slice bacon, and 1/2 cup milk.

Thanks.

Jen


Aside from the obvious question (why so much milk and only one egg)... the
egg was old. Old eggs tend to leach out water.

Jill


  #11 (permalink)  
Old 04-09-2006, 01:46 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 377
Default quiche problems - again!!


"Bob Terwilliger" wrote in message
...
Jen replied:

Did you use any veggies? Veggies like mushrooms, asparagus, onions,
etc, need to to be sauteed or grilled or whatever to drive most of the
moisture. You're other problem is using milk. Milk is mostly water.
Use cream instead. At the very least, use half n' half, but not milk.


No vegies. I didn't have any cream, but I always have milk. Maybe I'll
try less milk next time.


It just so happens that Cooks Illustrated tackled this exact problem last
year (and I just got around to reading about it yesterday -- I get their
end-of-the-year hardbound compilation of the year's magazines).

Their testing agreed with what notbob said: Although eggs and milk work
fine
in the absence of any other ingredients, the second you add anything else,
the milk becomes a problem. Decreasing the amount of milk didn't solve the
problem, because then the eggs became rubbery (and there was still a
problem
with excess liquid). The CI solution was to use half-and-half.



I'm not sure what *half-and-half* is. Does anyone know if it's available in
Australia? But I didn't use anything else but bacon.

Jen


  #12 (permalink)  
Old 04-09-2006, 01:47 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 377
Default quiche problems - again!!


"jmcquown" wrote in message
.. .
Jen wrote:
What causes a quiche to develop lots of liquid when it's cooked? I
tried to make small crustless quiches in a muffin pan. But it didn't
hold together too well, and there was quite a bit of liquid. I used
1 egg, 1 slice bacon, and 1/2 cup milk.

Thanks.

Jen


Aside from the obvious question (why so much milk and only one egg)... the
egg was old. Old eggs tend to leach out water.


I wanted just to do a small amount, so I quartered a recipe. The recipe was
4 eggs, 2 cups milk or cream. I only just bought the eggs.

Jen


  #13 (permalink)  
Old 04-09-2006, 03:00 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 1,861
Default quiche problems - again!!

Jen wrote on 04 Sep 2006 in rec.food.cooking

I'm not sure what *half-and-half* is. Does anyone know if it's
available in Australia? But I didn't use anything else but bacon.

Jen


In Canada half and half is called cerial cream...in other places it is
called coffee cream. It is part milk and part cream...around 10 to 15%
butter fat. As apposed to heavy cream's 30-35% butter fat.


Hope this helps

--


Curiosity killed the cat, but for a while I was a suspect

-Alan
  #14 (permalink)  
Old 04-09-2006, 03:29 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 386
Default quiche problems - again!!

In article ,
"Bob Terwilliger" wrote:

Jen replied:

Did you use any veggies? Veggies like mushrooms, asparagus, onions,
etc, need to to be sauteed or grilled or whatever to drive most of the
moisture. You're other problem is using milk. Milk is mostly water.
Use cream instead. At the very least, use half n' half, but not milk.


No vegies. I didn't have any cream, but I always have milk. Maybe I'll
try less milk next time.


It just so happens that Cooks Illustrated tackled this exact problem last
year (and I just got around to reading about it yesterday -- I get their
end-of-the-year hardbound compilation of the year's magazines).

Their testing agreed with what notbob said: Although eggs and milk work fine
in the absence of any other ingredients, the second you add anything else,
the milk becomes a problem. Decreasing the amount of milk didn't solve the
problem, because then the eggs became rubbery (and there was still a problem
with excess liquid). The CI solution was to use half-and-half.

Bob


Most of the time I disagree with Cooks Illustrated. We had quiche
yesterday made with a Julia Child recipe. Three eggs, 1 1/4 C milk,
salt and white pepper and a sprinkle of nutmeg for the custard. Always
works no matter what I add to it. in yesterdays quiche there was
crumbled bacon, cheese and sauteed leeks. What is added has never
caused a problem.

marcella
  #15 (permalink)  
Old 04-09-2006, 03:34 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 11,042
Default quiche problems - again!!

Jen wrote:

I'm not sure what *half-and-half* is. Does anyone know if it's available
in Australia? But I didn't use anything else but bacon.


Half-and-half is a mixture of half milk and half cream. According to the RFC
FAQ (have you read it?), it's 12% buttercream and the U.K. has an equivalent
product called "half cream." Is that available where you are?

Bob


 




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