Winemaking (rec.crafts.winemaking) Discussion of the process, recipes, tips, techniques and general exchange of lore on the process, methods and history of wine making. Includes traditional grape wines, sparkling wines & champagnes.

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Old 19-02-2004, 07:03 PM
Kevin
 
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Default Making wine from old kits

Hello.
Recently I was the recipient of 6 old wine kits. Three whites and
three reds. They are Western Classics 45 day kits and are from
RJSpagnols, probably the same as their Ancient Vines. The kits are 2
to 3 years old. They will be ready to bottle in 2 weeks. So far smell
and taste is ok. Two of the reds are a bit brownish and the whites
seem ok except maybe a little dark in color. Normally I would age my
wine in carboys for 6 months min. and I wouldn't add extra sulphite
beyond what the kit provided. Then I would try to bottle age for an
additional year or 2. However in this old wine scenario I would expect
to drink them immediately as I think they are oxidized somewhat. My
question is should I add extra sulphite other than what is supplied
and/or add bentonite (which I never do) to help strip some of the
color. A further sulphite question is would the extra sulphite if
added protect the wine and allow me to keep it a little longer. I've
posted twice on other ng's with no reply so just maybe someone here
has had a similar experience. Or suggestions from people like Lum or
Tom would also be appreciated. I would expect to filter them as well
with the MiniJet using # 2 filters. Thanks. Kevin

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Old 19-02-2004, 09:47 PM
Ray
 
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Default Making wine from old kits

I am not sure about extra sulfite protecting the wine better at this point.
I don't think it would but let someone else answer that. I agree with
drinking this young if they taste good. I would use the betonite as it will
clear the wine faster so it can be drunk young. I don't think it will strip
any of the off color due to oxidation.

Ray

"Kevin" wrote in message
om...
Hello.
Recently I was the recipient of 6 old wine kits. Three whites and
three reds. They are Western Classics 45 day kits and are from
RJSpagnols, probably the same as their Ancient Vines. The kits are 2
to 3 years old. They will be ready to bottle in 2 weeks. So far smell
and taste is ok. Two of the reds are a bit brownish and the whites
seem ok except maybe a little dark in color. Normally I would age my
wine in carboys for 6 months min. and I wouldn't add extra sulphite
beyond what the kit provided. Then I would try to bottle age for an
additional year or 2. However in this old wine scenario I would expect
to drink them immediately as I think they are oxidized somewhat. My
question is should I add extra sulphite other than what is supplied
and/or add bentonite (which I never do) to help strip some of the
color. A further sulphite question is would the extra sulphite if
added protect the wine and allow me to keep it a little longer. I've
posted twice on other ng's with no reply so just maybe someone here
has had a similar experience. Or suggestions from people like Lum or
Tom would also be appreciated. I would expect to filter them as well
with the MiniJet using # 2 filters. Thanks. Kevin



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Old 21-02-2004, 06:47 AM
Richard Kovach
 
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Default Making wine from old kits

I wouldn't bother changing anything, especially using more sulfite.
As I just responded in another thread, in my experience the kit
manufacturers already include far more potassium metabisulfite than is
necessary. If you think they've already aged to a detrimental point,
I would ferment them with a yeast that is more conducive to early
consumption (like Red Star Pasteur Red), following the manufacturer's
instructions (using their timeline and the fining agents) and then
consume/share them as aggressively as is both enjoyable and healthy
:-)

Cheers!
Richard

(Kevin) wrote in message . com...
Hello.
Recently I was the recipient of 6 old wine kits. Three whites and
three reds. They are Western Classics 45 day kits and are from
RJSpagnols, probably the same as their Ancient Vines. The kits are 2
to 3 years old. They will be ready to bottle in 2 weeks. So far smell
and taste is ok. Two of the reds are a bit brownish and the whites
seem ok except maybe a little dark in color. Normally I would age my
wine in carboys for 6 months min. and I wouldn't add extra sulphite
beyond what the kit provided. Then I would try to bottle age for an
additional year or 2. However in this old wine scenario I would expect
to drink them immediately as I think they are oxidized somewhat. My
question is should I add extra sulphite other than what is supplied
and/or add bentonite (which I never do) to help strip some of the
color. A further sulphite question is would the extra sulphite if
added protect the wine and allow me to keep it a little longer. I've
posted twice on other ng's with no reply so just maybe someone here
has had a similar experience. Or suggestions from people like Lum or
Tom would also be appreciated. I would expect to filter them as well
with the MiniJet using # 2 filters. Thanks. Kevin



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