Winemaking (rec.crafts.winemaking) Discussion of the process, recipes, tips, techniques and general exchange of lore on the process, methods and history of wine making. Includes traditional grape wines, sparkling wines & champagnes.

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Old 28-10-2006, 01:25 AM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
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Default Wine from kits

Ok, beer brewer here who's thinking about trying his hand at a kit
wine. Probably use White Labs yeast and pick a fairly sweet wine to
start with. Any recommendations, hints, tips?


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Old 28-10-2006, 03:24 AM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
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Default Wine from kits


Ok, beer brewer here who's thinking about trying his hand at a kit
wine. Probably use White Labs yeast and pick a fairly sweet wine to
start with. Any recommendations, hints, tips?


Start with a white, no matter what. Don't use potassium sorbate unless
your really doing a sweet wine. Follow the instructions to the letter.
Do a google search on all the topics that confuse you or for
instructions.
Go with a good quality kit.

Don

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Old 28-10-2006, 03:25 AM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
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Default Wine from kits

On 27 Oct 2006 17:25:13 -0700, "Ronin" wrote:

Ok, beer brewer here who's thinking about trying his hand at a kit
wine. Probably use White Labs yeast and pick a fairly sweet wine to
start with. Any recommendations, hints, tips?


Robin:

1) wine kits are designed to ferement dry and then be back sweetened
if desired with wine conditioner or juice. A few kits come with a
sweetener for this purpose.
2) most beer brewers freak out cause wine yeasts are slower and less
active fermentations. be patient
3) 4-week wine kits aren't ready to drink after 4 weeks, especially
reds. be patient
4) not that may kit makers use liquid yeasts. you may wish to stick
with the provided dry yeast, at least initially.
5) be patient
6) can't guess where you live or what kit brands are readily available
to you, so its tough to suggest a kit.
7) Be patient
8) Follow the instructions
9) since you're an experienced beer brewer, cleaning & sanitizing
shouldn't be a problem Some people like to get a separate primary for
their wine. This keeps the beer flavours & hops out of the wines (and
vice versa).
10) there's a good discussion forum at www.winepress.us

Whites are sweetened more than reds. Rieslings, gewurztraminers,
blushes are often sweetened.

If you have a local shop, ask them about a good kit for a first wine.

OH and the best advice I can give you 'be patient', Steve
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Old 28-10-2006, 03:41 AM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
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Default Wine from kits

Welcome, Beer brewer. My neighbor is also one, I've tried to convince
him to expand, but he makes such good beers! smile. But his wife likes
wines, so here was my advice.
Pick a Pinot Gris or Chenin Blanc to start with, since she liked those.

Tips - hmm. Kits are 6 gallons not 5, so new carboys are needed.
Instructions are absolute, follow them. From what I hear, beer making is
different. Can't wait to try, though. Hope my neighbor and I can swap
equipment and try.

Good luck,
DAve

Ronin wrote:
Ok, beer brewer here who's thinking about trying his hand at a kit
wine. Probably use White Labs yeast and pick a fairly sweet wine to
start with. Any recommendations, hints, tips?

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Old 28-10-2006, 02:14 PM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
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Posts: 3
Default Wine from kits

Beer brewer here who also does wine from kits. I've exclusively used
Winexpert kits--very good. Like Dave A. says, you're going to need a
bigger carboy--7.9 gallons--for you're primary. I've only seen these as
buckets.

Make a white first, that's a pretty good idea. Also, Winexpert makes a
brand called "Island Mist," think Boone's Farm but a bit better. If you
do decide to make a red at some point, make sure you de-gas it very
well.

Dave
http://www.homebrew-exchange.com

Dave Allison wrote:
Welcome, Beer brewer. My neighbor is also one, I've tried to convince
him to expand, but he makes such good beers! smile. But his wife likes
wines, so here was my advice.
Pick a Pinot Gris or Chenin Blanc to start with, since she liked those.

Tips - hmm. Kits are 6 gallons not 5, so new carboys are needed.
Instructions are absolute, follow them. From what I hear, beer making is
different. Can't wait to try, though. Hope my neighbor and I can swap
equipment and try.

Good luck,
DAve

Ronin wrote:
Ok, beer brewer here who's thinking about trying his hand at a kit
wine. Probably use White Labs yeast and pick a fairly sweet wine to
start with. Any recommendations, hints, tips?




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Old 28-10-2006, 02:43 PM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
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Posts: 5
Default Wine from kits

Thanks for the advice, keep it coming. I have the blessing of being in
Austin, thus I have access to an AWESOME brew shop
www.austinhomebrew.com.

I have a 7 gallon plus bucket, dunno what the carboy is. I'll have to
check.

Homebrew Exchange wrote:
Beer brewer here who also does wine from kits. I've exclusively used
Winexpert kits--very good. Like Dave A. says, you're going to need a
bigger carboy--7.9 gallons--for you're primary. I've only seen these as
buckets.

Make a white first, that's a pretty good idea. Also, Winexpert makes a
brand called "Island Mist," think Boone's Farm but a bit better. If you
do decide to make a red at some point, make sure you de-gas it very
well.

Dave
http://www.homebrew-exchange.com

Dave Allison wrote:
Welcome, Beer brewer. My neighbor is also one, I've tried to convince
him to expand, but he makes such good beers! smile. But his wife likes
wines, so here was my advice.
Pick a Pinot Gris or Chenin Blanc to start with, since she liked those.

Tips - hmm. Kits are 6 gallons not 5, so new carboys are needed.
Instructions are absolute, follow them. From what I hear, beer making is
different. Can't wait to try, though. Hope my neighbor and I can swap
equipment and try.

Good luck,
DAve

Ronin wrote:
Ok, beer brewer here who's thinking about trying his hand at a kit
wine. Probably use White Labs yeast and pick a fairly sweet wine to
start with. Any recommendations, hints, tips?


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Old 28-10-2006, 03:37 PM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
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Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 38
Default Wine from kits

I do primary fermentation in open food grade buckets, ranging from
6-1/2 gallons to about 30 (depends on batch size).

Carboys are glass water bottles, ranging in size from 5 US gallons to
13-1/2 (if there are bigger ones I've never seen 'em). Typical sizes
are 5 and 6 gallons -- I've seen 6-1/2, 7, and 7-1/2. I've got a
bunch of 5 gallons, with a couple of 3-1/2 gallon ones.

I've been doing kits in recent years, since I moved to NC from Upstate
NY. I've had trouble finding grapes, and haven't liked the ones I
found. I may make a run to the Finger Lakes of NY next fall ....

The wine kits often call for making up 6 gallons. I typically dilute
to about 5-1/2. Allowing for sediment loss I end up with a full 5
gallon carboy (which is really about 5-1/4 gallons). I don't believe
in topping up with water (dilutes the wine) so this works out for me.

Watch the SG with the kits. They'll tell you what the initial SG
should be, but I've found that they're often a bit low -- one kit I
started recently was WAY low. A few cups of confectioners sugar fixed
that. [I used confectioners sugar because it stirs in easily -- white
sugar works fine.]

Two final pieces of advice that others have already mentioned, but IMO
are THE source of problems with wine kits (and wine making in
general):

1) Hygiene -- Be scrupulously clean with everything. I rinse
everything with sulfite water prior to use, and just shake off the
excess. There is no such thing as too clean!

2) Follow the Directions!!! The kits are designed to function a
certain way -- one kit currently in production requires stirring the
sediment up when adding the clearing agents, but no racking at this
time. According to the directions the sediment is required to make
the clearing process work.

I need to research this, for my own curiosity, but from previous
experience with kits I'm following the directions -- regardless of
whether or not I understand the "why" part. :-)

Bryan



On 28 Oct 2006 06:43:04 -0700, "Ronin" wrote:

Thanks for the advice, keep it coming. I have the blessing of being in
Austin, thus I have access to an AWESOME brew shop
www.austinhomebrew.com.

I have a 7 gallon plus bucket, dunno what the carboy is. I'll have to
check.

Homebrew Exchange wrote:
Beer brewer here who also does wine from kits. I've exclusively used
Winexpert kits--very good. Like Dave A. says, you're going to need a
bigger carboy--7.9 gallons--for you're primary. I've only seen these as
buckets.

Make a white first, that's a pretty good idea. Also, Winexpert makes a
brand called "Island Mist," think Boone's Farm but a bit better. If you
do decide to make a red at some point, make sure you de-gas it very
well.

Dave
http://www.homebrew-exchange.com

Dave Allison wrote:
Welcome, Beer brewer. My neighbor is also one, I've tried to convince
him to expand, but he makes such good beers! smile. But his wife likes
wines, so here was my advice.
Pick a Pinot Gris or Chenin Blanc to start with, since she liked those.

Tips - hmm. Kits are 6 gallons not 5, so new carboys are needed.
Instructions are absolute, follow them. From what I hear, beer making is
different. Can't wait to try, though. Hope my neighbor and I can swap
equipment and try.

Good luck,
DAve

Ronin wrote:
Ok, beer brewer here who's thinking about trying his hand at a kit
wine. Probably use White Labs yeast and pick a fairly sweet wine to
start with. Any recommendations, hints, tips?

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Old 28-10-2006, 06:05 PM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
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Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 5
Default Wine from kits

Ahh, what I meant was I didn't know the capacity of my carboy, but I
see how the statement was confusing. I am not sure how, but in my beer
brewing I have managed to accumulate 2 of everything, thus if I get
into wine, I can have wine and beer going at the same time.

More alcohol for me


Jake Speed wrote:
I do primary fermentation in open food grade buckets, ranging from
6-1/2 gallons to about 30 (depends on batch size).

Carboys are glass water bottles, ranging in size from 5 US gallons to
13-1/2 (if there are bigger ones I've never seen 'em). Typical sizes
are 5 and 6 gallons -- I've seen 6-1/2, 7, and 7-1/2. I've got a
bunch of 5 gallons, with a couple of 3-1/2 gallon ones.

I've been doing kits in recent years, since I moved to NC from Upstate
NY. I've had trouble finding grapes, and haven't liked the ones I
found. I may make a run to the Finger Lakes of NY next fall ....

The wine kits often call for making up 6 gallons. I typically dilute
to about 5-1/2. Allowing for sediment loss I end up with a full 5
gallon carboy (which is really about 5-1/4 gallons). I don't believe
in topping up with water (dilutes the wine) so this works out for me.

Watch the SG with the kits. They'll tell you what the initial SG
should be, but I've found that they're often a bit low -- one kit I
started recently was WAY low. A few cups of confectioners sugar fixed
that. [I used confectioners sugar because it stirs in easily -- white
sugar works fine.]

Two final pieces of advice that others have already mentioned, but IMO
are THE source of problems with wine kits (and wine making in
general):

1) Hygiene -- Be scrupulously clean with everything. I rinse
everything with sulfite water prior to use, and just shake off the
excess. There is no such thing as too clean!

2) Follow the Directions!!! The kits are designed to function a
certain way -- one kit currently in production requires stirring the
sediment up when adding the clearing agents, but no racking at this
time. According to the directions the sediment is required to make
the clearing process work.

I need to research this, for my own curiosity, but from previous
experience with kits I'm following the directions -- regardless of
whether or not I understand the "why" part. :-)

Bryan



On 28 Oct 2006 06:43:04 -0700, "Ronin" wrote:

Thanks for the advice, keep it coming. I have the blessing of being in
Austin, thus I have access to an AWESOME brew shop
www.austinhomebrew.com.

I have a 7 gallon plus bucket, dunno what the carboy is. I'll have to
check.

Homebrew Exchange wrote:
Beer brewer here who also does wine from kits. I've exclusively used
Winexpert kits--very good. Like Dave A. says, you're going to need a
bigger carboy--7.9 gallons--for you're primary. I've only seen these as
buckets.

Make a white first, that's a pretty good idea. Also, Winexpert makes a
brand called "Island Mist," think Boone's Farm but a bit better. If you
do decide to make a red at some point, make sure you de-gas it very
well.

Dave
http://www.homebrew-exchange.com

Dave Allison wrote:
Welcome, Beer brewer. My neighbor is also one, I've tried to convince
him to expand, but he makes such good beers! smile. But his wife likes
wines, so here was my advice.
Pick a Pinot Gris or Chenin Blanc to start with, since she liked those.

Tips - hmm. Kits are 6 gallons not 5, so new carboys are needed.
Instructions are absolute, follow them. From what I hear, beer making is
different. Can't wait to try, though. Hope my neighbor and I can swap
equipment and try.

Good luck,
DAve

Ronin wrote:
Ok, beer brewer here who's thinking about trying his hand at a kit
wine. Probably use White Labs yeast and pick a fairly sweet wine to
start with. Any recommendations, hints, tips?


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Old 29-10-2006, 03:05 AM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
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Default Wine from kits

Ah, good idea. I just finished Winexpert Island Mist's Cranberry Shiraz
and Mango Citrus. The Mango Citrus has EVERYONE liking it - like a wine
cooler - only 7% alcohol. The Cranberry Shiraz is great for the
holidays, IMHO, like with turkey, and I serve it slightly chilled. Wine
drinkers that like it dry won't like these, but they are a hit with
almost everyone.

DAve

p.s. Boone's Farm? haha.

Homebrew Exchange wrote:
Beer brewer here who also does wine from kits. I've exclusively used
Winexpert kits--very good. Like Dave A. says, you're going to need a
bigger carboy--7.9 gallons--for you're primary. I've only seen these as
buckets.

Make a white first, that's a pretty good idea. Also, Winexpert makes a
brand called "Island Mist," think Boone's Farm but a bit better. If you
do decide to make a red at some point, make sure you de-gas it very
well.

Dave
http://www.homebrew-exchange.com

Dave Allison wrote:
Welcome, Beer brewer. My neighbor is also one, I've tried to convince
him to expand, but he makes such good beers! smile. But his wife likes
wines, so here was my advice.
Pick a Pinot Gris or Chenin Blanc to start with, since she liked those.

Tips - hmm. Kits are 6 gallons not 5, so new carboys are needed.
Instructions are absolute, follow them. From what I hear, beer making is
different. Can't wait to try, though. Hope my neighbor and I can swap
equipment and try.

Good luck,
DAve

Ronin wrote:
Ok, beer brewer here who's thinking about trying his hand at a kit
wine. Probably use White Labs yeast and pick a fairly sweet wine to
start with. Any recommendations, hints, tips?


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Old 31-10-2006, 01:27 AM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
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Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 305
Default Wine from kits

I would recommend you go one of two ways.

Either to a something like a Gewürztraminer. there are some very nice kits
for this medium sweet white wine and the ones I have made have come out very
nice. If you are not familiar with this wine, don't worry, most are not.
It is a very nice wine.

Or make a picnic style fruit wine. The Island Mist has some very nice ones.
My favorite is the Peach, Apricot, Chardonnay.

Good luck. You will probably fine that making wine is much easier and much
for forgiving than making beer.

Ray

"Ronin" wrote in message
oups.com...
Ok, beer brewer here who's thinking about trying his hand at a kit
wine. Probably use White Labs yeast and pick a fairly sweet wine to
start with. Any recommendations, hints, tips?






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Old 02-11-2006, 07:08 PM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
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Posts: 50
Default Wine from kits

Ronin wrote:
Ok, beer brewer here who's thinking about trying his hand at a kit
wine. Probably use White Labs yeast and pick a fairly sweet wine to
start with. Any recommendations, hints, tips?


New here myself, and I have learned a lot from the experienced people
here already.

My husband, though, is a experienced home brewer. It is his
recommendation that as far as equipment goes, you would be well advised
to have separate equipment for both beer and wine making. The reason
for this is that metabisulphite is extremely incompatible with beer
making; even a tiny amount trapped in a minute crevasse in a tube will
ruin an entire batch of beer.

This is not something I would want to risk. But, as the saying goes YMMV.

Abby

--
The ChildFree Abby Archives - http://www.dismal-light.net/childfreeabby/
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Old 02-11-2006, 08:39 PM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
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Default Wine from kits


Childfree Abby wrote:

New here myself, and I have learned a lot from the experienced people
here already.

My husband, though, is a experienced home brewer. It is his
recommendation that as far as equipment goes, you would be well advised
to have separate equipment for both beer and wine making. The reason
for this is that metabisulphite is extremely incompatible with beer
making; even a tiny amount trapped in a minute crevasse in a tube will
ruin an entire batch of beer.


Abby,

I would certainly like to hear more about "even a tiny amount of"
sulphite ruining a batch of beer. I, as well as other brewers,
regularly add Pot. Meta. to my mash and sparge water and I'm very
confident that my beers are not ruined.

And yes, I use the same primary fermentors and carboys for both beer
and wine with no ill effect on either.

Does he have any references or research to support the sulphite
comment?

Andy

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Old 02-11-2006, 08:58 PM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
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Posts: 117
Default Wine from kits


Childfree Abby wrote "My husband, though, is a experienced home brewer. It
is his
recommendation that as far as equipment goes, you would be well advised to
have separate equipment for both beer and wine making. The reason for
this is that metabisulphite is extremely incompatible with beer making;
even a tiny amount trapped in a minute crevasse in a tube will ruin an
entire batch of beer."


This is entirely untrue. I don't know where your husband came across this
information but I would like to see his references. There are many beer
makers (myself included) that use K metabisulfite to instantly neutralize
chlorine and chloramines in city tap water before it goes into the mash. If
anything K metabisulfite will act as an antioxidant in beer. The reason
it's not routinely used in beer making is that the pH of beer is
considerably higher than wine and the amounts of SO2 that would be necessary
to protect beer from oxidation would be too high.

Bill Frazier
Olathe, Kansas USA


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Old 03-11-2006, 12:15 AM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
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Default Wine from kits

JEP62 wrote:
Childfree Abby wrote:




Abby,

I would certainly like to hear more about "even a tiny amount of"
sulphite ruining a batch of beer. I, as well as other brewers,
regularly add Pot. Meta. to my mash and sparge water and I'm very
confident that my beers are not ruined.

And yes, I use the same primary fermentors and carboys for both beer
and wine with no ill effect on either.

Does he have any references or research to support the sulphite
comment?

Andy


It is mainly a matter of taste. he found that the sulfite left an
unpleasant taste of sulfides. It more than likely the fact that he is
more sensitive to this than most people, which precipitated his interest
in home brewing some thirty years ago.

In Labrador, at the time, the last shipment of beer came in before
freeze up, and the next one didn't arrive until after the thaw - some
six months later. This does horrible things to commercial beer which
had a preservative in it that began to break down after 3 months. It
gave him horrible migraines. It was better to make his own - which he did.

But as I said earlier, your mileage may vary.

Abby
--
The ChildFree Abby Archives - http://www.dismal-light.net/childfreeabby/
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Old 03-11-2006, 02:33 AM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
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Default Wine from kits

I use my beer primary fermenters, minus the lids, as primaries for 5
to 6 gallon batches of wine. Been doing it for 20+ years with no
problems. I also use the same carboys, racking, and bottling
equipment (well, not the capper! G).

At the same time I'm a poster child for hygiene and rinsing things --
compulsiveness in this area may contribute to my success. My final
stage in cleaning my tubes is to rack a gallon of clear water through
it to get out any final residue.

I'm also not sensitive to SO2, so I wouldn't notice something that a
sensitive person would.

Bryan


On Thu, 02 Nov 2006 14:08:43 -0400, Childfree Abby
wrote:

Ronin wrote:
Ok, beer brewer here who's thinking about trying his hand at a kit
wine. Probably use White Labs yeast and pick a fairly sweet wine to
start with. Any recommendations, hints, tips?


New here myself, and I have learned a lot from the experienced people
here already.

My husband, though, is a experienced home brewer. It is his
recommendation that as far as equipment goes, you would be well advised
to have separate equipment for both beer and wine making. The reason
for this is that metabisulphite is extremely incompatible with beer
making; even a tiny amount trapped in a minute crevasse in a tube will
ruin an entire batch of beer.

This is not something I would want to risk. But, as the saying goes YMMV.

Abby



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