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Old 24-04-2008, 07:05 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default residue at cork

I tried a California merlot & discovered a thick, dark residue on the
inside of the bottle after it was corked. Ick! What is it? I
presume this is something to do with improper storage.

Thanks in advance, my fellow wine lovers!!

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Old 25-04-2008, 07:16 AM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default residue at cork

It may not be a storage issue and may not be an indication that
anything is wrong with the wine. The bottle was probably stored upside
down and the sediment collected on the cork. Just wipe it off the cork
or the neck of the bottle.
You didn't mention how the wine tasted. So, how did the wine taste?

On Apr 24, 11:05 am, wrote:
I tried a California merlot & discovered a thick, dark residue on the
inside of the bottle after it was corked. Ick! What is it? I
presume this is something to do with improper storage.

Thanks in advance, my fellow wine lovers!!


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Old 26-04-2008, 12:34 AM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default residue at cork


I tried a California merlot & discovered a thick, dark residue on the
inside of the bottle after it was corked. Ick! What is it? I
presume this is something to do with improper storage.


Thanks in advance, my fellow wine lovers!!


Many red wines will drop a sediment after bottling. It's a totally
natural thing and in no way harms the wine. The stuff on the inside of
the cork is often that same sediment combined with crystals of tartaric
acid, another natural component of wine. The only thing I'd suggest is
that you don't agitate the bottle too much when pouring from a bottle
with sediment in it, as the sediment itself will impart a bitter taste
to the wine. If it's been agitated, you can pour the wine through a
coffee filter to remove the sediment.


Coffee filter; great idea. The sediment was very heavy, even coating
the inside of the bottle once it was empty, and it was apparent in the
glass. Bleagh.
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Old 26-04-2008, 12:35 AM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default residue at cork


It may not be a storage issue and may not be an indication that
anything is wrong with the wine. The bottle was probably stored upside
down and the sediment collected on the cork. Just wipe it off the cork
or the neck of the bottle.
You didn't mention how the wine tasted. So, how did the wine taste?


Taste was actually fine. Light, palatable, one of those strange reds
that is better cold. I don't particularly like it, though.

70 points.


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Old 28-04-2008, 01:42 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default residue at cork

On Apr 25, 7:34�pm, wrote:
I tried a California merlot & discovered a thick, dark residue on the
inside of the bottle after it was corked. �Ick! �What is it? �I
presume this is something to do with improper storage.


Thanks in advance, my fellow wine lovers!! �


Many red wines will drop a sediment after bottling. �It's a totally
natural thing and in no way harms the wine. �The stuff on the inside of
the cork is often that same sediment combined with crystals of tartaric
acid, another natural component of wine. �The only thing I'd suggest is
that you don't agitate the bottle too much when pouring from a bottle
with sediment in it, as the sediment itself will impart a bitter taste
to the wine. �If it's been agitated, you can pour the wine through a
coffee filter to remove the sediment.


Coffee filter; great idea. �The sediment was very heavy, even coating
the inside of the bottle once it was empty, and it was apparent in the
glass. �Bleagh.


What exactly was the wine?
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Old 28-04-2008, 11:44 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default residue at cork


I tried a California merlot & discovered a thick, dark residue on the
inside of the bottle after it was corked. Ick! What is it? I
presume this is something to do with improper storage.


Thanks in advance, my fellow wine lovers!! �


Many red wines will drop a sediment after bottling. �It's a totally
natural thing and in no way harms the wine. �The stuff on the inside of
the cork is often that same sediment combined with crystals of tartaric
acid, another natural component of wine. �The only thing I'd suggest is
that you don't agitate the bottle too much when pouring from a bottle
with sediment in it, as the sediment itself will impart a bitter taste
to the wine. If it's been agitated, you can pour the wine through a
coffee filter to remove the sediment.


Coffee filter; great idea. �The sediment was very heavy, even coating
the inside of the bottle once it was empty, and it was apparent in the
glass. Bleagh.


What exactly was the wine?


A rather crude Merlot from Sonoma.
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Old 29-04-2008, 12:00 AM posted to alt.food.wine
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Posts: 1,930
Default residue at cork

On Apr 28, 6:44*pm, wrote:
I tried a California merlot & discovered a thick, dark residue on the
inside of the bottle after it was corked. Ick! What is it? I
presume this is something to do with improper storage.


Thanks in advance, my fellow wine lovers!! �


Many red wines will drop a sediment after bottling. �It's a totally
natural thing and in no way harms the wine. �The stuff on the inside of
the cork is often that same sediment combined with crystals of tartaric
acid, another natural component of wine. �The only thing I'd suggest is
that you don't agitate the bottle too much when pouring from a bottle
with sediment in it, as the sediment itself will impart a bitter taste
to the wine. If it's been agitated, you can pour the wine through a
coffee filter to remove the sediment.


Coffee filter; great idea. �The sediment was very heavy, even coating
the inside of the bottle once it was empty, and it was apparent in the
glass. Bleagh.


What exactly was the wine?


A rather crude Merlot from Sonoma.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


I mean the name. If the wine was bad, crude and you rated it at a 70
I'd like to know what it is so I don't buy it too.
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Old 29-04-2008, 09:05 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 7
Default residue at cork


I tried a California merlot & discovered a thick, dark residue on the
inside of the bottle after it was corked. Ick! What is it? I
presume this is something to do with improper storage.


Thanks in advance, my fellow wine lovers!!


Many red wines will drop a sediment after bottling. It's a totally
natural thing and in no way harms the wine. The stuff on the inside of
the cork is often that same sediment combined with crystals of tartaric
acid, another natural component of wine. The only thing I'd suggest is
that you don't agitate the bottle too much when pouring from a bottle
with sediment in it, as the sediment itself will impart a bitter taste
to the wine. If it's been agitated, you can pour the wine through a
coffee filter to remove the sediment.


Coffee filter; great idea. The sediment was very heavy, even coating
the inside of the bottle once it was empty, and it was apparent in the
glass. Bleagh.


What exactly was the wine?


A rather crude Merlot from Sonoma.-


I mean the name.


I knew ya did If I knew it I would share and if I come upon it
again I'll make a note of it.



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