Sourdough (rec.food.sourdough) Discussing the hobby or craft of baking with sourdough. We are not just a recipe group, Our charter is to discuss the care, feeding, and breeding of yeasts and lactobacilli that make up sourdough cultures.

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Old 02-07-2016, 01:34 AM posted to rec.food.sourdough
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Default sourdough rye cranberry walnut bread

I used to get this bread from a local supplier (Costco). They no longer
do so. Now, I've found several recipes for bread of this kind, but they
differ in both content and construction. I was hoping that someone here
might have knowledge of a recipe like this, and have some pertinent tips.

Take care and be well all,
Dusty
--
"It's easier to fool people than to convince them that they have been
fooled." - Mark Twain

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Old 02-07-2016, 02:42 PM posted to rec.food.sourdough
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Default sourdough rye cranberry walnut bread

On 7/1/2016 7:34 PM, Dusty wrote:
I used to get this bread from a local supplier (Costco). They no longer
do so. Now, I've found several recipes for bread of this kind, but they
differ in both content and construction. I was hoping that someone here
might have knowledge of a recipe like this, and have some pertinent tips.

Take care and be well all,
Dusty

I don't have anything for you but I would be interested in a recipe for
that as well.
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Old 02-07-2016, 02:55 PM posted to rec.food.sourdough
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Default sourdough rye cranberry walnut bread

On 02-Jul-16 06:42, dejamos wrote:
On 7/1/2016 7:34 PM, Dusty wrote:
I used to get this bread from a local supplier (Costco). They no longer
do so. Now, I've found several recipes for bread of this kind, but they
differ in both content and construction. I was hoping that someone here
might have knowledge of a recipe like this, and have some pertinent tips.

Take care and be well all,
Dusty

I don't have anything for you but I would be interested in a recipe for
that as well.

Okay, excellent! I'll be fooling with the ones I managed to dig up over
the next few weeks. If I get one that turns out as I remember the
original bread to be, I'll be sure to send it to you.

Dusty
--
"It's easier to fool people than to convince them that they have been
fooled." - Mark Twain
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Old 02-07-2016, 09:01 PM posted to rec.food.sourdough
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Default sourdough rye cranberry walnut bread

On 7/2/2016 8:55 AM, Dusty wrote:
On 02-Jul-16 06:42, dejamos wrote:
On 7/1/2016 7:34 PM, Dusty wrote:
I used to get this bread from a local supplier (Costco). They no longer
do so. Now, I've found several recipes for bread of this kind, but they
differ in both content and construction. I was hoping that someone here
might have knowledge of a recipe like this, and have some pertinent
tips.

Take care and be well all,
Dusty

I don't have anything for you but I would be interested in a recipe for
that as well.

Okay, excellent! I'll be fooling with the ones I managed to dig up over
the next few weeks. If I get one that turns out as I remember the
original bread to be, I'll be sure to send it to you.

Dusty


That would be great!

There is something I read somewhere online about sourdough and rye, and
that is to use the rye for the starter rather than adding it with the
other flour/s. If I remember correctly it had something to do with the
rye then being used as the leavening agent. I don't know if that has
any scientific basis but I used that method to make this Rye Sourdough:
http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/241...-sunflower-and
-pumpkin-seed-cold-soaker

It made a delicious loaf with a good rise so I tend to use that method
whenever I make a sourdough with rye.
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Old 02-07-2016, 10:15 PM posted to rec.food.sourdough
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Default sourdough rye cranberry walnut bread

On Sat, 2 Jul 2016 15:01:25 -0500, dejamos
wrote:


There is something I read somewhere online about sourdough and rye, and
that is to use the rye for the starter rather than adding it with the
other flour/s. If I remember correctly it had something to do with the
rye then being used as the leavening agent. I don't know if that has
any scientific basis but I used that method to make this Rye Sourdough:
http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/241...-sunflower-and
-pumpkin-seed-cold-soaker

It made a delicious loaf with a good rise so I tend to use that method
whenever I make a sourdough with rye.


From the article:

"The leaven is a rye sour which I refreshed a couple of times and fed
with some "altus" along the way too."

Wiki:
"altus" is a Latin adjective meaning "high, deep, noble or profound",
surname of old Norman. It's also the name of an un-manned spacecraft.

But that didn't help much.

Found it:

http://www.sourdoughhome.com/index.p...nt=ingredients

"Altus is the secret of good rye bread. Altus is left-over ground-up
rye bread, soaked in water. To make altus, cut the crusts from a loaf
of bread, soak it in water for several hours, or overnight, under
refrigeration. It will keep several weeks under refrigeration. Use
small amounts in bread dough, pressing water out of it. This will
intensify the taste of the rye bread, make it a moister bread. You
will have to adjust the hydration of your dough when you use altus,
probably adding a bit more flour."
[]'s
--
Don't be evil - Google 2004
We have a new policy - Google 2012


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Old 02-07-2016, 11:15 PM posted to rec.food.sourdough
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Default sourdough rye cranberry walnut bread

On 01/07/2016 6:34 PM, Dusty wrote:
I used to get this bread from a local supplier (Costco). They no longer
do so. Now, I've found several recipes for bread of this kind, but they
differ in both content and construction. I was hoping that someone here
might have knowledge of a recipe like this, and have some pertinent tips.

Take care and be well all,
Dusty

I have no idea what the bread at Costco was like as I haven't been there
in ages. However, have you looked at the Hamelman recipe for sourdough
rye with walnuts and raisins that could be adapted. The overall formula is:

High gluten flour(ie hard spring wheat bread flour) 65%
Medium rye flour 35%
Water 68%
Salt 1.8%
Fresh yeast 1.5%***
Raisins/cranberries 12.5%
Walnuts 12.5%

*** A sourdough culture is made with most of the rye flour and matured
for 14-16 hours.
If it looks like what you are looking for, I could scan the 2 pages and
e-mail them to you.
Graham
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Old 02-07-2016, 11:20 PM posted to rec.food.sourdough
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Default sourdough rye cranberry walnut bread

On 7/2/2016 4:15 PM, Shadow wrote:
On Sat, 2 Jul 2016 15:01:25 -0500, dejamos
wrote:


There is something I read somewhere online about sourdough and rye, and
that is to use the rye for the starter rather than adding it with the
other flour/s. If I remember correctly it had something to do with the
rye then being used as the leavening agent. I don't know if that has
any scientific basis but I used that method to make this Rye Sourdough:
http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/241...-sunflower-and
-pumpkin-seed-cold-soaker

It made a delicious loaf with a good rise so I tend to use that method
whenever I make a sourdough with rye.


From the article:

"The leaven is a rye sour which I refreshed a couple of times and fed
with some "altus" along the way too."

Wiki:
"altus" is a Latin adjective meaning "high, deep, noble or profound",
surname of old Norman. It's also the name of an un-manned spacecraft.

But that didn't help much.

Found it:

http://www.sourdoughhome.com/index.p...nt=ingredients

"Altus is the secret of good rye bread. Altus is left-over ground-up
rye bread, soaked in water. To make altus, cut the crusts from a loaf
of bread, soak it in water for several hours, or overnight, under
refrigeration. It will keep several weeks under refrigeration. Use
small amounts in bread dough, pressing water out of it. This will
intensify the taste of the rye bread, make it a moister bread. You
will have to adjust the hydration of your dough when you use altus,
probably adding a bit more flour."
[]'s


Thanks for that information. I have only used rye flour for the starter
without the altus. My comment was more about using rye flour for the
starter instead of regular or bread flour. One of these days I plan to
try the altus. I do not make rye bread very often these days.
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Old 03-07-2016, 05:06 PM posted to rec.food.sourdough
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Default sourdough rye cranberry walnut bread

On 02-Jul-16 15:15, graham wrote:
On 01/07/2016 6:34 PM, Dusty wrote:
I used to get this bread from a local supplier (Costco). They no longer
do so. Now, I've found several recipes for bread of this kind, but they
differ in both content and construction. I was hoping that someone here
might have knowledge of a recipe like this, and have some pertinent tips.

Take care and be well all,
Dusty

I have no idea what the bread at Costco was like as I haven't been there
in ages. However, have you looked at the Hamelman recipe for sourdough
rye with walnuts and raisins that could be adapted. The overall formula is:

High gluten flour(ie hard spring wheat bread flour) 65%
Medium rye flour 35%
Water 68%
Salt 1.8%
Fresh yeast 1.5%***
Raisins/cranberries 12.5%
Walnuts 12.5%

*** A sourdough culture is made with most of the rye flour and matured
for 14-16 hours.
If it looks like what you are looking for, I could scan the 2 pages and
e-mail them to you.
Graham

Hello Graham! Good to hear from you again my friend.
Sounds wonderful! If it's not too much trouble, please do eMail it to
me. I would love to have as many tried-and-true variations as I can
get, to test and compare against each other.

Take care and be well all,
Dusty
--
"It's easier to fool people than to convince them that they have been
fooled." - Mark Twain
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Old 03-07-2016, 05:26 PM posted to rec.food.sourdough
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Posts: 4,053
Default sourdough rye cranberry walnut bread

On 03/07/2016 10:06 AM, Dusty wrote:
On 02-Jul-16 15:15, graham wrote:
On 01/07/2016 6:34 PM, Dusty wrote:
I used to get this bread from a local supplier (Costco). They no longer
do so. Now, I've found several recipes for bread of this kind, but they
differ in both content and construction. I was hoping that someone here
might have knowledge of a recipe like this, and have some pertinent
tips.

Take care and be well all,
Dusty

I have no idea what the bread at Costco was like as I haven't been there
in ages. However, have you looked at the Hamelman recipe for sourdough
rye with walnuts and raisins that could be adapted. The overall
formula is:

High gluten flour(ie hard spring wheat bread flour) 65%
Medium rye flour 35%
Water 68%
Salt 1.8%
Fresh yeast 1.5%***
Raisins/cranberries 12.5%
Walnuts 12.5%

*** A sourdough culture is made with most of the rye flour and matured
for 14-16 hours.
If it looks like what you are looking for, I could scan the 2 pages and
e-mail them to you.
Graham

Hello Graham! Good to hear from you again my friend.
Sounds wonderful! If it's not too much trouble, please do eMail it to
me. I would love to have as many tried-and-true variations as I can
get, to test and compare against each other.

Take care and be well all,
Dusty

It's on its way!
Graham
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Old 05-07-2016, 04:05 AM posted to rec.food.sourdough
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Posts: 6
Default sourdough rye cranberry walnut bread

On 03-Jul-16 09:26, graham wrote:
On 03/07/2016 10:06 AM, Dusty wrote:
On 02-Jul-16 15:15, graham wrote:
On 01/07/2016 6:34 PM, Dusty wrote:
I used to get this bread from a local supplier (Costco). They no
longer
do so. Now, I've found several recipes for bread of this kind, but
they
differ in both content and construction. I was hoping that someone
here
might have knowledge of a recipe like this, and have some pertinent
tips.

Take care and be well all,
Dusty
I have no idea what the bread at Costco was like as I haven't been there
in ages. However, have you looked at the Hamelman recipe for sourdough
rye with walnuts and raisins that could be adapted. The overall
formula is:

High gluten flour(ie hard spring wheat bread flour) 65%
Medium rye flour 35%
Water 68%
Salt 1.8%
Fresh yeast 1.5%***
Raisins/cranberries 12.5%
Walnuts 12.5%

*** A sourdough culture is made with most of the rye flour and matured
for 14-16 hours.
If it looks like what you are looking for, I could scan the 2 pages and
e-mail them to you.
Graham

Hello Graham! Good to hear from you again my friend.
Sounds wonderful! If it's not too much trouble, please do eMail it to
me. I would love to have as many tried-and-true variations as I can
get, to test and compare against each other.

Take care and be well all,
Dusty

It's on its way!

Got it! Thank you my friend! Your help is very much appreciated!

Dusty
--
"It's easier to fool people than to convince them that they have been
fooled." - Mark Twain


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Old 06-07-2016, 03:46 AM posted to rec.food.sourdough
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Default sourdough rye cranberry walnut bread

On 02-Jul-16 13:01, dejamos wrote:
On 7/2/2016 8:55 AM, Dusty wrote:
On 02-Jul-16 06:42, dejamos wrote:
On 7/1/2016 7:34 PM, Dusty wrote:
I used to get this bread from a local supplier (Costco). They no
longer
do so. Now, I've found several recipes for bread of this kind, but
they
differ in both content and construction. I was hoping that someone
here
might have knowledge of a recipe like this, and have some pertinent
tips.

Take care and be well all,
Dusty
I don't have anything for you but I would be interested in a recipe for
that as well.

Okay, excellent! I'll be fooling with the ones I managed to dig up over
the next few weeks. If I get one that turns out as I remember the
original bread to be, I'll be sure to send it to you.

Dusty


That would be great!

There is something I read somewhere online about sourdough and rye, and
that is to use the rye for the starter rather than adding it with the
other flour/s. If I remember correctly it had something to do with the
rye then being used as the leavening agent. I don't know if that has
any scientific basis but I used that method to make this Rye Sourdough:
http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/241...-sunflower-and
-pumpkin-seed-cold-soaker

It made a delicious loaf with a good rise so I tend to use that method
whenever I make a sourdough with rye.

Well, past experience is certainly valuable. Sadly, too often in my
cooking pursuits, I've found that too many of those old "rule-of-thumb"
sayings were without merit. I'll give your suggestion a try, but
that'll be after I've made it work with my regular starter (as I've done
for years and years--which means that's it's both handy and available
today ). Then at least I'll have the opportunity to compare one to
the other...cuz THAT'S where one learns the value of techniques of that
kind. I'm always on the lookout for a newer, better way of making bread
happen. And your tip may well be the one I've been looking for.
I think that my biggest bugaboo is the notion by so many posting in
places like this, that YOU MUST WEIGHT ALL THINGS TO GET IT RIGHT! An
utter load of rubbish! Yes, the "pro's" do it that way. Having worked
by/with some of them, I also learned why they do it. It's because today
they'll make 36 units of something, and tomorrow they'll need to make
104. That is why they do it by weight. It's the only rational thing to
do, given what and how they're doing things. But for the single loaves
that we reading here usually make, volume measurements are far more
useful. I can scoop out a cup of flour in a flash...having to weigh it
out is a pain in the behind. There's no inherent accuracy advantage
from using volumetric measurements as opposed to weight measurements.
It's easy to grab 1-1/4 teaspoons of salt. But a real PITA to ramp it
up for 104 units of bread. That's when using weight shines (especially
metrics). Oh well...I guess it's like with so many things...ya use what
works for you. Demonstrate the advantages...let me see what works...as
opposed to preaching them as accomplished gospel.
It's going to be a few days before I can tackle that (on the road ATM),
but I'll certainly give it a lash sometime soon. Thanks again for your
kind words, recipe, and tip.

Dusty
Dodging the raindrops in the ever-damp Pacific North West.
--
"It's easier to fool people than to convince them that they have been
fooled." - Mark Twain
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Old 06-07-2016, 02:39 PM posted to rec.food.sourdough
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Default sourdough rye cranberry walnut bread

On Tue, 5 Jul 2016 19:46:19 -0700, Dusty
wrote:

Snip

I think that my biggest bugaboo is the notion by so many posting in
places like this, that YOU MUST WEIGHT ALL THINGS TO GET IT RIGHT! An
utter load of rubbish!


I love you, Dusty.
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Old 06-07-2016, 03:07 PM posted to rec.food.sourdough
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Default sourdough rye cranberry walnut bread

On 7/5/2016 9:46 PM, Dusty wrote:

Well, past experience is certainly valuable. Sadly, too often in my
cooking pursuits, I've found that too many of those old "rule-of-thumb"
sayings were without merit. I'll give your suggestion a try, but
that'll be after I've made it work with my regular starter (as I've done
for years and years--which means that's it's both handy and available
today ). Then at least I'll have the opportunity to compare one to
the other...cuz THAT'S where one learns the value of techniques of that
kind. I'm always on the lookout for a newer, better way of making bread
happen. And your tip may well be the one I've been looking for.
I think that my biggest bugaboo is the notion by so many posting in
places like this, that YOU MUST WEIGHT ALL THINGS TO GET IT RIGHT! An
utter load of rubbish! Yes, the "pro's" do it that way. Having worked
by/with some of them, I also learned why they do it. It's because today
they'll make 36 units of something, and tomorrow they'll need to make
104. That is why they do it by weight. It's the only rational thing to
do, given what and how they're doing things. But for the single loaves
that we reading here usually make, volume measurements are far more
useful. I can scoop out a cup of flour in a flash...having to weigh it
out is a pain in the behind. There's no inherent accuracy advantage
from using volumetric measurements as opposed to weight measurements.
It's easy to grab 1-1/4 teaspoons of salt. But a real PITA to ramp it
up for 104 units of bread. That's when using weight shines (especially
metrics). Oh well...I guess it's like with so many things...ya use what
works for you. Demonstrate the advantages...let me see what works...as
opposed to preaching them as accomplished gospel.
It's going to be a few days before I can tackle that (on the road ATM),
but I'll certainly give it a lash sometime soon. Thanks again for your
kind words, recipe, and tip.

Dusty
Dodging the raindrops in the ever-damp Pacific North West.


All of that makes good sense. When I decided to tackle sourdough I
looked at a lot of sites and found all kinds of conflicting information
about what you must and must not do. Luckily, I had enough bread making
experience under my belt to realize that most of those rules were just
what you say - a case of "this is how I did it and it worked so this is
how everybody must do it to be successful" and I was able to proceed
with a jar, some flour and water, and time.

Just to be clear, I was not making a suggestion; I was curious to see if
anyone with more experience than I have knows whether or not there is
any basis for that idea. Since that is how I made my first loaf of
sourdough that had rye and it worked, that is how I do it, but I would
never suggest that everyone else should do it that way. I suppose I
should try a loaf of rye with my regular starter and see if I notice a
difference and if so, then I can tell everyone that they must do it my
way.

I do weigh my bread ingredients but that is mostly because I have the
scale and I am a little bit obsessive and I like the idea that I am at
least *starting* with the same amount of ingredients. I do realize that
it makes absolutely no difference in the end, as I constantly add more
or less flour depending on all of the usual factors.

I am sure I have many bread making habits that would make the experts
shudder. But I enjoy the process and overall I am pleased with my
results and most of my friends seem to be as well and that is what
matters in the end.

Good luck with the bread and I hope you stay dry!
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Old 06-07-2016, 03:11 PM posted to rec.food.sourdough
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Default sourdough rye cranberry walnut bread

On 06-Jul-16 06:39, Boron Elgar wrote:
On Tue, 5 Jul 2016 19:46:19 -0700, Dusty
wrote:

Snip

I think that my biggest bugaboo is the notion by so many posting in
places like this, that YOU MUST WEIGHT ALL THINGS TO GET IT RIGHT! An
utter load of rubbish!


I love you, Dusty.

Well thank you kindly! But be careful...mindless, dyed-in-the-wool
ideologues still read here... !
Good to read you again, Boron.

Take care and be well,
Dusty
--
"It's easier to fool people than to convince them that they have been
fooled." - Mark Twain


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