Sourdough (rec.food.sourdough) Discussing the hobby or craft of baking with sourdough. We are not just a recipe group, Our charter is to discuss the care, feeding, and breeding of yeasts and lactobacilli that make up sourdough cultures.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-08-2004, 08:41 PM
**bg**
 
Posts: n/a
Default Salt - which kind - Salt is NaCl - Sodium Chloride.

Salt inhibits most organic 'growing'.

Salt being Sodium Chloride (NaCl), are you asking if salt has impurities in
it? (There's also the world of potassium salts IIRC.)

Likely you know the usual difference between table salt and sea salt is that
table salt commonly has iodine added.

Humans apparently need a bit of iodine on a regular basis.

To my thinking, mined salt could be contaminated by other elements or
compounds suspended/mixed in it or coated on it.

Same with sea salt one would think.

But I'm no expert on salt, I'm a musician and audio engineer. Those things
I know a fair amount about.

***Here's a trick***

Dissolve some of your salt, say, 6 tbs in 1/2 c purified water; stir well,
let it sit for a while and see if you observe anything floating (film or
particles) on the surface or the bottom.

This process (flotation/settling) is a way to remove impurities from
material, used in mining for one.

You could boil it for a while to amplify the process.

Also filter it through bacterial air-mask material, see if any residual
stuff.

Could be very small, a good magnifying glass or microscope comes in handy.

-bg-
www.thelittlecanadaheadphoneband.ca


"Amit.B." wrote in message
om...
I was wondering if the type of salt used to make sourdough changes the
effect on the lactobacilli and yeasts. coarse salt? sea salt? atlantic
sea salt?




  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-08-2004, 08:41 PM
**bg**
 
Posts: n/a
Default Salt - which kind - Salt is NaCl - Sodium Chloride.

Salt inhibits most organic 'growing'.

Salt being Sodium Chloride (NaCl), are you asking if salt has impurities in
it? (There's also the world of potassium salts IIRC.)

Likely you know the usual difference between table salt and sea salt is that
table salt commonly has iodine added.

Humans apparently need a bit of iodine on a regular basis.

To my thinking, mined salt could be contaminated by other elements or
compounds suspended/mixed in it or coated on it.

Same with sea salt one would think.

But I'm no expert on salt, I'm a musician and audio engineer. Those things
I know a fair amount about.

***Here's a trick***

Dissolve some of your salt, say, 6 tbs in 1/2 c purified water; stir well,
let it sit for a while and see if you observe anything floating (film or
particles) on the surface or the bottom.

This process (flotation/settling) is a way to remove impurities from
material, used in mining for one.

You could boil it for a while to amplify the process.

Also filter it through bacterial air-mask material, see if any residual
stuff.

Could be very small, a good magnifying glass or microscope comes in handy.

-bg-
www.thelittlecanadaheadphoneband.ca


"Amit.B." wrote in message
om...
I was wondering if the type of salt used to make sourdough changes the
effect on the lactobacilli and yeasts. coarse salt? sea salt? atlantic
sea salt?





Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Pet Peeve: Low Sodium Sea Salt gregz General Cooking 4 02-10-2014 05:37 PM
Pet Peeve: Low Sodium Sea Salt Julie Bove[_2_] General Cooking 1 01-10-2014 10:10 AM
Cornstarch and Sodium Bicarbonate create their own neutral salt Booz Allen General Cooking 0 11-03-2014 03:06 PM
Potassium chloride salt substitutes Cheryl[_3_] General Cooking 69 05-03-2012 03:04 AM
Salt - which kind? Charles Perry Sourdough 5 23-07-2004 05:13 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 12:27 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2020 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"

 

Copyright © 2017