Preserving (rec.food.preserving) Devoted to the discussion of recipes, equipment, and techniques of food preservation. Techniques that should be discussed in this forum include canning, freezing, dehydration, pickling, smoking, salting, and distilling.

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Old 28-10-2005, 07:06 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
zxcvbob
 
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Default Enchilada sauce

Does this look cannable to y'all, or will the flour break down during
the pressure canning? (probably pack hot and process about 20 minutes @
11 pounds in pint jars) This isn't the actual recipe I'm gonna use but
it's one I pulled off the web just now and it is *very* close. My
recipe (at home) uses ground Chimayo chiles and has a little oregano in
it, and the tomato sauce is optional -- I'll probably triple the recipe
for canning and put in one (8 oz) can of tomato sauce for the whole
batch. All the major proportions are the same:

Enchilada Sauce

2 tablespoons vegetable oil [or lard]
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
2 tablespoons hot chili powder
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1 (8-ounce) can tomato sauce
2 cups water
1 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon garlic powder

Heat oil in large 2-quart saucepan; stir in flour and chili powder; cook
for 1 minute. Add remaining ingredients bring to a boil and simmer for
about 10 minutes. Makes 3 cups sauce.

* * *

Thanks,
Bob

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Old 28-10-2005, 10:12 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
Brian Mailman
 
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Default Enchilada sauce

zxcvbob wrote:

Does this look cannable to y'all, or will the flour break down during
the pressure canning?


Can't advise as to that, but it looks authentic enough. It's how the
Mexican restaurant I kind of worked in (same kitchen, my side doors went
to a French le joint, and the other side went to a Mexican place) made
theirs. Roux was was hot--very hot--oil, with the flour and spices
mixed in. I always liked the aroma when they dumped in the flour mixture.

B/
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Old 28-10-2005, 10:40 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
The Joneses
 
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Default Enchilada sauce

Brian Mailman wrote:

zxcvbob wrote:

Does this look cannable to y'all, or will the flour break down during
the pressure canning?


Can't advise as to that, but it looks authentic enough. It's how the
Mexican restaurant I kind of worked in (same kitchen, my side doors went
to a French le joint, and the other side went to a Mexican place) made
theirs. Roux was was hot--very hot--oil, with the flour and spices
mixed in. I always liked the aroma when they dumped in the flour mixture.

B/


I make mine even simpler: fresh garlic, sweated in olive oil, chile (blendered
or milled if you want, or powdered chile, not chili powder), and a whisper of
cumin or cinnamon if you like it, chicken stock, salt to taste. I do like it
tempered with a tomato sauce. I don't make a roux at all.
Edrena



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Old 29-10-2005, 12:47 AM posted to rec.food.preserving
Hermione
 
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Default Enchilada sauce

zxcvbob wrote:

Does this look cannable to y'all, or will the flour break down during
the pressure canning? (probably pack hot and process about 20 minutes @
11 pounds in pint jars) This isn't the actual recipe I'm gonna use but
it's one I pulled off the web just now and it is *very* close. My
recipe (at home) uses ground Chimayo chiles and has a little oregano in
it, and the tomato sauce is optional -- I'll probably triple the recipe
for canning and put in one (8 oz) can of tomato sauce for the whole
batch. All the major proportions are the same:

Enchilada Sauce

2 tablespoons vegetable oil [or lard]
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
2 tablespoons hot chili powder
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1 (8-ounce) can tomato sauce
2 cups water
1 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon garlic powder

Heat oil in large 2-quart saucepan; stir in flour and chili powder; cook
for 1 minute. Add remaining ingredients bring to a boil and simmer for
about 10 minutes. Makes 3 cups sauce.

* * *

Thanks,
Bob

Bob, regarding the flour breaking down, IMO, yes it will. I canned a
condensed tomato soup recipe that called for butter and flour. The
recipe said to bwb but with the butter and flour I thought it should be
pressured canned. The resulting soup is very good but not thick like
condensed should be despite the flour. The flour broke right down
As far as the recipe above, I would likely freeze it serving sizes
instead of canning it. Depending on how much you think you will use
each time, either freeze in ice cube tray or muffin tin then pop out and
store in ziploc. HTH
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Old 29-10-2005, 01:05 AM posted to rec.food.preserving
zxcvbob
 
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Default Enchilada sauce

Hermione wrote:
zxcvbob wrote:

Does this look cannable to y'all, or will the flour break down during
the pressure canning? (probably pack hot and process about 20 minutes
@ 11 pounds in pint jars) This isn't the actual recipe I'm gonna use
but it's one I pulled off the web just now and it is *very* close. My
recipe (at home) uses ground Chimayo chiles and has a little oregano
in it, and the tomato sauce is optional -- I'll probably triple the
recipe for canning and put in one (8 oz) can of tomato sauce for the
whole batch. All the major proportions are the same:

Enchilada Sauce

2 tablespoons vegetable oil [or lard]
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
2 tablespoons hot chili powder
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1 (8-ounce) can tomato sauce
2 cups water
1 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon garlic powder

Heat oil in large 2-quart saucepan; stir in flour and chili powder;
cook for 1 minute. Add remaining ingredients bring to a boil and
simmer for about 10 minutes. Makes 3 cups sauce.

* * *

Thanks,
Bob


Bob, regarding the flour breaking down, IMO, yes it will. I canned a
condensed tomato soup recipe that called for butter and flour. The
recipe said to bwb but with the butter and flour I thought it should be
pressured canned. The resulting soup is very good but not thick like
condensed should be despite the flour. The flour broke right down As
far as the recipe above, I would likely freeze it serving sizes instead
of canning it. Depending on how much you think you will use each time,
either freeze in ice cube tray or muffin tin then pop out and store in
ziploc. HTH



When the flour broke down, it didn't get sweet did it? If the sauce
thins out, that's not that bad. If it gets sweet because the
gelatinized starch breaks down into dextrose, that would be bad.

I buy the commercial stuff in 10 and 19 ounce cans, and use whole cans
at a time. So pints jars would be just about right. It's kind of
expensive for what it is, and I can make it better cheaper. I may try
canning a small batch and see how it goes...

Best regards,
Bob


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Old 29-10-2005, 03:14 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
Hermione
 
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Default Enchilada sauce

zxcvbob wrote:

Hermione wrote:

zxcvbob wrote:

Does this look cannable to y'all, or will the flour break down during
the pressure canning? (probably pack hot and process about 20 minutes
@ 11 pounds in pint jars) This isn't the actual recipe I'm gonna use
but it's one I pulled off the web just now and it is *very* close.
My recipe (at home) uses ground Chimayo chiles and has a little
oregano in it, and the tomato sauce is optional -- I'll probably
triple the recipe for canning and put in one (8 oz) can of tomato
sauce for the whole batch. All the major proportions are the same:

Enchilada Sauce

2 tablespoons vegetable oil [or lard]
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
2 tablespoons hot chili powder
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1 (8-ounce) can tomato sauce
2 cups water
1 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon garlic powder

Heat oil in large 2-quart saucepan; stir in flour and chili powder;
cook for 1 minute. Add remaining ingredients bring to a boil and
simmer for about 10 minutes. Makes 3 cups sauce.

* * *

Thanks,
Bob



Bob, regarding the flour breaking down, IMO, yes it will. I canned a
condensed tomato soup recipe that called for butter and flour. The
recipe said to bwb but with the butter and flour I thought it should
be pressured canned. The resulting soup is very good but not thick
like condensed should be despite the flour. The flour broke right
down As far as the recipe above, I would likely freeze it serving
sizes instead of canning it. Depending on how much you think you will
use each time, either freeze in ice cube tray or muffin tin then pop
out and store in ziploc. HTH




When the flour broke down, it didn't get sweet did it? If the sauce
thins out, that's not that bad. If it gets sweet because the
gelatinized starch breaks down into dextrose, that would be bad.


I can't be 100% sure but IMO the resulting soup concentrate was sweeter
than it should be so I would assume that was from the flour breaking
down. The soup concentrate is still quite good. I'm woondering if you
could use the high heat *clear gel* in place of the flour. I would be
tempted to try a batch to see what happens. The only real problem I see
with your recipe is you are taking something that was canned and
re-canning it. It would be better if you could make the sauce from
scratch, add a little lemon or lime juice and the seasonings then reduce
it to the desired consistency without the flour. Then can it up. I've
done this with tomato paste making it into taco hot sauce without a
problem but this year I got a nicer tasting hot sauce using freshly made
tomato paste.

I buy the commercial stuff in 10 and 19 ounce cans, and use whole cans
at a time. So pints jars would be just about right. It's kind of
expensive for what it is, and I can make it better cheaper. I may try
canning a small batch and see how it goes...


Out of curiosity, how much does the commercial stuff cost? Making your
own even using commercial tomato sauce should be quite a bit cheaper.

Best regards,
Bob

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Old 29-10-2005, 04:02 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
zxcvbob
 
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Default Enchilada sauce

Hermione wrote:

...tempted to try a batch to see what happens. The only real problem I see
with your recipe is you are taking something that was canned and
re-canning it. It would be better if you could make the sauce from
scratch, add a little lemon or lime juice and the seasonings then reduce
it to the desired consistency without the flour. Then can it up. I've
done this with tomato paste making it into taco hot sauce without a
problem but this year I got a nicer tasting hot sauce using freshly made
tomato paste.


The tomato sauce is a minor (and optional) ingredient. So this for the
most part is a fresh recipe.


I buy the commercial stuff in 10 and 19 ounce cans, and use whole cans
at a time. So pints jars would be just about right. It's kind of
expensive for what it is, and I can make it better cheaper. I may try
canning a small batch and see how it goes...



Out of curiosity, how much does the commercial stuff cost? Making your
own even using commercial tomato sauce should be quite a bit cheaper.


Depending on what brand I get, it's 79 to $1.29 per 10 ounce can. I
usually use one cheap can and one middle-to-expensive can, because the
cheap stuff is only available in "mild".

Bob


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