Preserving (rec.food.preserving) Devoted to the discussion of recipes, equipment, and techniques of food preservation. Techniques that should be discussed in this forum include canning, freezing, dehydration, pickling, smoking, salting, and distilling.

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Old 05-11-2016, 04:13 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Default Fruit from quince bush, worth bothering with?

A friend has offered us the quince fruit from her flowering quince bush. There's about 10 lbs of fruit.

Is the quince fruit from the bush types worth bothering with taste wise?

I am running into quite varying opinions here and there the past few weeks, so thought I would try here.


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We are zone 4b, so it could be any of the three most common varieties of quince bush.
http://homeguides.sfgate.com/differe...uit-65846.html

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Old 05-11-2016, 05:37 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Default Fruit from quince bush, worth bothering with?

On 11/5/2016 11:13 AM, wrote:
A friend has offered us the quince fruit from her flowering quince bush. There's about 10 lbs of fruit.

Is the quince fruit from the bush types worth bothering with taste wise?

I am running into quite varying opinions here and there the past few weeks, so thought I would try here.


___________________________________

We are zone 4b, so it could be any of the three most common varieties of quince bush.
http://homeguides.sfgate.com/differe...uit-65846.html

___________________________________

We had a quince bush in zone 9b that did poorly but did make good fruit
one year. It was a shot in the dark but the tree was free.

Quince are a good fruit for jellies, jams, etc. Here's a look at them:
http://www.thekitchn.com/quince-toug...lligence-73041

It would be worth the effort if you have a goodly amount and you might
be surprised at how good they are when processed. Give it a shot.

George
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Old 06-12-2016, 03:59 AM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Default Fruit from quince bush, worth bothering with?

On Saturday, 5 November 2016 13:38:00 UTC-4, George Shirley wrote:
On 11/5/2016 11:13 AM, randal wrote:
A friend has offered us the quince fruit from her flowering quince bush. There's about 10 lbs of fruit.

Is the quince fruit from the bush types worth bothering with taste wise?

I am running into quite varying opinions here and there the past few weeks, so thought I would try here.


___________________________________

We are zone 4b, so it could be any of the three most common varieties of quince bush.
http://homeguides.sfgate.com/differe...uit-65846.html

___________________________________

We had a quince bush in zone 9b that did poorly but did make good fruit
one year. It was a shot in the dark but the tree was free.

Quince are a good fruit for jellies, jams, etc. Here's a look at them:
http://www.thekitchn.com/quince-toug...lligence-73041

It would be worth the effort if you have a goodly amount and you might
be surprised at how good they are when processed. Give it a shot.

George


I want to report back. Specifically, about the hard white inner core material (endocarp?) in quince that most people say to get out or it goes gritty on you.

I couldn't find any information on whether an electric food mill would take care of that or not. I decided to give it a go.

I can report back that while the electric food mill took care of the skin, and seeds, that it:

(a) partly ground up some of the seed, so you had what looked like a few bits of black pepper in it. Not the end of the world, for the work saved, BUT... ;
(b) the food mill just ground up that "endocarp" into a fine power and made the whole pulpy solution gritty like sand.

In the future, I'll get that "endocarp" out.

To save it, I filtered the quince pulp through a jelly bag (twice), and made it into jelly instead of jam.
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Old 06-12-2016, 04:40 AM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Default Fruit from quince bush, worth bothering with?

On 12/5/2016 8:59 PM, Randal Oulton wrote:


In the future, I'll get that "endocarp" out.

To save it, I filtered the quince pulp through a jelly bag (twice), and made it into jelly instead of jam.




Nice that you caught it in time to salvage it.

Tip: Quince paste/jam/jelly/marmalade is good spread on crusty bread
and topped with a creamy cheese, the way my ancestors ate it.

"Marmelo" is the Portuguese word for quince and the origin of "marmalade."

gloria p


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