Preserving (rec.food.preserving) Devoted to the discussion of recipes, equipment, and techniques of food preservation. Techniques that should be discussed in this forum include canning, freezing, dehydration, pickling, smoking, salting, and distilling.

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Old 28-09-2011, 09:15 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Default Bread prices redux

Went to the used bread store this morning, same bread that was #$3.39 a
loaf at Kroger was $1.39 a loaf there. Bought two loaves of Nature's Own
Honey Seven Grain and then they gave me two more loaves as a bonus.
That's cut the price down to 69.5 cents per loaf. Guess where I'm buying
bread from now on and the place is only about three blocks from the
house on the main drag in our town.

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Old 29-09-2011, 12:06 AM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Default Bread prices redux

On 9/28/2011 2:15 PM, George Shirley wrote:
Went to the used bread store this morning, same bread that was #$3.39 a
loaf at Kroger was $1.39 a loaf there. Bought two loaves of Nature's Own
Honey Seven Grain and then they gave me two more loaves as a bonus.
That's cut the price down to 69.5 cents per loaf. Guess where I'm buying
bread from now on and the place is only about three blocks from the
house on the main drag in our town.



I just Googled and we have an Orowheat outlet about 6 miles away.
Good thought. Their bread is not bad at all and I love their English
muffins.

Funny, when they first started making them they cost much less than
Thomas's. Now the latter is on sale most of the time for 2/$5 and
the Orowheat are $3.49 a pkg. Probably worth the trip if I have freezer
space.

gloria p
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Old 29-09-2011, 12:42 AM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Default Bread prices redux

George Shirley wrote:
Went to the used bread store this morning, same bread that was #$3.39 a
loaf at Kroger was $1.39 a loaf there. Bought two loaves of Nature's Own
Honey Seven Grain and then they gave me two more loaves as a bonus.
That's cut the price down to 69.5 cents per loaf. Guess where I'm buying
bread from now on and the place is only about three blocks from the
house on the main drag in our town.



The Hostess thrift store here charges almost full price for used bread.
They used to have good deals before Interstate Bakeries went bankrupt
in 2004. When they came back they jacked the prices way up at the
outlet stores. I can get better fresh bread cheaper at Cub Foods and
Aldi. (both are cheaper than Walmart except for the really awful squishy
white bread.)

I can bake a 2 pound loaf of sourdough bread for just a few cents. At
least last time I bought a 25# bag of flour at Sam's it didn't cost
hardly anything -- but that was over a year ago.

-Bob
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Old 29-09-2011, 02:27 AM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Default Bread prices redux

I bake as much of my own bread as possible--try to do Challah every
Friday, if I am not working, volunteering or traveling--and then
sometimes I will make it ahead of time so I can take it with. I
absolutely, love, adore, crave rye bread but have never really been
able to make a good loaf myself so, I buy it at the outlet store,
$1.59 a loaf. That's about half the price it is at the grocery store.
I've done Spelt with some success, just haven't made it for a while.
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Old 29-09-2011, 12:02 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Default Bread prices redux

outstanding, we often wait for a sale if we are buying bread then freeze, if
its that close i would probably just get it when i wanted it, if you like
bread pudding these stores often have wonderful things for that as well, Lee
"George Shirley" wrote in message
.com...
Went to the used bread store this morning, same bread that was #$3.39 a
loaf at Kroger was $1.39 a loaf there. Bought two loaves of Nature's Own
Honey Seven Grain and then they gave me two more loaves as a bonus. That's
cut the price down to 69.5 cents per loaf. Guess where I'm buying bread
from now on and the place is only about three blocks from the house on the
main drag in our town.





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Old 29-09-2011, 12:03 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Default Bread prices redux

our thomasas go on sale for a dollar a package evry so often at meijer,
regular are about three dollars, when we had freezer space we stocked up as
we both love english muffins, Lee
"gloria.p" wrote in message
...
On 9/28/2011 2:15 PM, George Shirley wrote:
Went to the used bread store this morning, same bread that was #$3.39 a
loaf at Kroger was $1.39 a loaf there. Bought two loaves of Nature's Own
Honey Seven Grain and then they gave me two more loaves as a bonus.
That's cut the price down to 69.5 cents per loaf. Guess where I'm buying
bread from now on and the place is only about three blocks from the
house on the main drag in our town.



I just Googled and we have an Orowheat outlet about 6 miles away.
Good thought. Their bread is not bad at all and I love their English
muffins.

Funny, when they first started making them they cost much less than
Thomas's. Now the latter is on sale most of the time for 2/$5 and
the Orowheat are $3.49 a pkg. Probably worth the trip if I have freezer
space.

gloria p



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Old 29-09-2011, 12:38 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
Nad Nad is offline
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Default Bread prices redux

"Storrmmee" wrote:
our thomasas go on sale for a dollar a package evry so often at meijer,
regular are about three dollars, when we had freezer space we stocked up as
we both love english muffins, Lee
"gloria.p" wrote in message
...
On 9/28/2011 2:15 PM, George Shirley wrote:
Went to the used bread store this morning, same bread that was #$3.39 a
loaf at Kroger was $1.39 a loaf there. Bought two loaves of Nature's Own
Honey Seven Grain and then they gave me two more loaves as a bonus.
That's cut the price down to 69.5 cents per loaf. Guess where I'm buying
bread from now on and the place is only about three blocks from the
house on the main drag in our town.



I just Googled and we have an Orowheat outlet about 6 miles away.
Good thought. Their bread is not bad at all and I love their English
muffins.

Funny, when they first started making them they cost much less than
Thomas's. Now the latter is on sale most of the time for 2/$5 and
the Orowheat are $3.49 a pkg. Probably worth the trip if I have freezer
space.

gloria p


Hmmm...

A food preserving forum talking about "buying" and freezing bread?
Do we not make our own bread? But make our own Jams and Juices?

Why not just buy a fifty pound container of wheat berries? Wheat berries
in containers will last for YEARS. Get a grinder and over time it will pay
for itself and Really have some of the best tasting bread ever at a lower
cost than those stale past due date bread discount stores.

--
Nad
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Old 29-09-2011, 02:23 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Default Bread prices redux

the thing i appreciate about this group is that the majority of the regular
participants are supportive of other participants, regardless of where on
the preserving bell curve they land, from beginner, to expert, jams, breads,
bulk cooking all count, and are all lauded as valid to saving money,
perfecting a craft and generally eating better,

Lee,
"Nad" wrote in message
...
"Storrmmee" wrote:
our thomasas go on sale for a dollar a package evry so often at meijer,
regular are about three dollars, when we had freezer space we stocked up
as
we both love english muffins, Lee
"gloria.p" wrote in message
...
On 9/28/2011 2:15 PM, George Shirley wrote:
Went to the used bread store this morning, same bread that was #$3.39 a
loaf at Kroger was $1.39 a loaf there. Bought two loaves of Nature's
Own
Honey Seven Grain and then they gave me two more loaves as a bonus.
That's cut the price down to 69.5 cents per loaf. Guess where I'm
buying
bread from now on and the place is only about three blocks from the
house on the main drag in our town.


I just Googled and we have an Orowheat outlet about 6 miles away.
Good thought. Their bread is not bad at all and I love their English
muffins.

Funny, when they first started making them they cost much less than
Thomas's. Now the latter is on sale most of the time for 2/$5 and
the Orowheat are $3.49 a pkg. Probably worth the trip if I have freezer
space.

gloria p


Hmmm...

A food preserving forum talking about "buying" and freezing bread?
Do we not make our own bread? But make our own Jams and Juices?

Why not just buy a fifty pound container of wheat berries? Wheat berries
in containers will last for YEARS. Get a grinder and over time it will pay
for itself and Really have some of the best tasting bread ever at a lower
cost than those stale past due date bread discount stores.

--
Nad



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Old 29-09-2011, 04:22 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Default Bread prices redux

On 9/29/2011 5:38 AM, Nad wrote:

A food preserving forum talking about "buying" and freezing bread?
Do we not make our own bread? But make our own Jams and Juices?


I do make a couple of kinds of bread on occasion but haven't gotten into
making sandwich bread regularly. Convenience is the word.

Why not just buy a fifty pound container of wheat berries? Wheat berries
in containers will last for YEARS. Get a grinder and over time it will pay
for itself and Really have some of the best tasting bread ever at a lower
cost than those stale past due date bread discount stores.


Why not just plow up your back yard and grown your own wheat? As Lee
said, there's a continuum and we all find our own place on the curve.

gloria p
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Old 29-09-2011, 08:39 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
Nad Nad is offline
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Default Bread prices redux

"gloria.p" wrote:

Why not just plow up your back yard and grown your own wheat? As Lee
said, there's a continuum and we all find our own place on the curve.

gloria p


Wheat does not grow very well in my state or my soil is not good enough for
wheat. Especially the varieties that make great bread. I have tried, but
the varieties of wheat that does grow well here is ok for animal feed. The
local grain store does sell human food grade wheat from different areas of
the country. The wheat berries are sold in fifty pound containers. It cost
less to grind your own flour and for convenience I use an Automatic Bread
Machine. I make few trips to the market and I save on gas.

I have a small personal hobby farm of twenty acres. Fresh eggs from the hen
house, milk from my own dairy cow and huge vegetable garden. This is why I
have an interest in food preserving. This is my place on the curve.

--
Nad


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Old 29-09-2011, 10:01 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Default Bread prices redux

On 9/29/2011 6:38 AM, Nad wrote:
wrote:
our thomasas go on sale for a dollar a package evry so often at meijer,
regular are about three dollars, when we had freezer space we stocked up as
we both love english muffins, Lee
wrote in message
...
On 9/28/2011 2:15 PM, George Shirley wrote:
Went to the used bread store this morning, same bread that was #$3.39 a
loaf at Kroger was $1.39 a loaf there. Bought two loaves of Nature's Own
Honey Seven Grain and then they gave me two more loaves as a bonus.
That's cut the price down to 69.5 cents per loaf. Guess where I'm buying
bread from now on and the place is only about three blocks from the
house on the main drag in our town.


I just Googled and we have an Orowheat outlet about 6 miles away.
Good thought. Their bread is not bad at all and I love their English
muffins.

Funny, when they first started making them they cost much less than
Thomas's. Now the latter is on sale most of the time for 2/$5 and
the Orowheat are $3.49 a pkg. Probably worth the trip if I have freezer
space.

gloria p


Hmmm...

A food preserving forum talking about "buying" and freezing bread?
Do we not make our own bread? But make our own Jams and Juices?

Why not just buy a fifty pound container of wheat berries? Wheat berries
in containers will last for YEARS. Get a grinder and over time it will pay
for itself and Really have some of the best tasting bread ever at a lower
cost than those stale past due date bread discount stores.

And I do make my own bread on occasion. There are more important things
to do around here than to continuously make bread. Grind my own wheat,
nope, see previous sentence. I preserve what I want to eat that we like
and the descendants like. Bread is to cheap to spend time making for the
little bit that we eat. To each his own.

Oh yeah, freezing things you buy is also food preserving. Like meat,
veggies, bread, desserts etc.
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Old 29-09-2011, 10:03 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Default Bread prices redux

On 9/29/2011 2:39 PM, Nad wrote:
wrote:

Why not just plow up your back yard and grown your own wheat? As Lee
said, there's a continuum and we all find our own place on the curve.

gloria p


Wheat does not grow very well in my state or my soil is not good enough for
wheat. Especially the varieties that make great bread. I have tried, but
the varieties of wheat that does grow well here is ok for animal feed. The
local grain store does sell human food grade wheat from different areas of
the country. The wheat berries are sold in fifty pound containers. It cost
less to grind your own flour and for convenience I use an Automatic Bread
Machine. I make few trips to the market and I save on gas.

I have a small personal hobby farm of twenty acres. Fresh eggs from the hen
house, milk from my own dairy cow and huge vegetable garden. This is why I
have an interest in food preserving. This is my place on the curve.

Our hobby farm is 75 feet wide and 150 feet long, I think many of the
folks on this newsgroup have even smaller places. We once lived for
years on ten acres and had another ten acres to grow things on. At age
72 that ain't gonna happen again. Each of us should enjoy their own
place on the curve as others have said.
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Old 29-09-2011, 10:08 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Default Bread prices redux

On 9/28/2011 6:42 PM, zxcvbob wrote:
George Shirley wrote:
Went to the used bread store this morning, same bread that was #$3.39
a loaf at Kroger was $1.39 a loaf there. Bought two loaves of Nature's
Own Honey Seven Grain and then they gave me two more loaves as a
bonus. That's cut the price down to 69.5 cents per loaf. Guess where
I'm buying bread from now on and the place is only about three blocks
from the house on the main drag in our town.



The Hostess thrift store here charges almost full price for used bread.
They used to have good deals before Interstate Bakeries went bankrupt in
2004. When they came back they jacked the prices way up at the outlet
stores. I can get better fresh bread cheaper at Cub Foods and Aldi.
(both are cheaper than Walmart except for the really awful squishy white
bread.)

I can bake a 2 pound loaf of sourdough bread for just a few cents. At
least last time I bought a 25# bag of flour at Sam's it didn't cost
hardly anything -- but that was over a year ago.

-Bob

See what the price is now Bob. Seems fuel prices and inflation have
driven most food stuffs up about 20 to 30 percent. Even rice, which is
grown here, has nearly doubled in price in the last year. Beef is
selling at record prices, mostly due to the drought in
Texas. So many cattle were sold to avoid drought deaths that the price
went down for a bit but is really up now. Other parts of the US are
either suffering drought or excessive rainfall, all of that affects the
price of the food we buy. The food banks here are seeing more people
showing up looking for food. Welfare rolls are expanding. We are seeing
a rise in employment rates though. We have a new, very large casino
coming on line for construction and one of the local petrochem plants is
getting ready to build a multi-billion dollar expansion. That will help
our local economy and the state's too.
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Old 29-09-2011, 11:13 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
Nad Nad is offline
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Default Bread prices redux

George Shirley wrote:

Our hobby farm is 75 feet wide and 150 feet long, I think many of the
folks on this newsgroup have even smaller places. We once lived for years
on ten acres and had another ten acres to grow things on. At age 72 that
ain't gonna happen again. Each of us should enjoy their own place on the
curve as others have said.


I often wonder... I was born and raised in the city and did not like the
big city and always wanted to live in the country. When I did some teaching
in the local schools I found that many kids born and raised in the country
wanted to move and live in the big city.

Sounds like we swapped lives. I enjoy the country life... I hope you enjoy
yours

--
Nad
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Old 01-10-2011, 04:02 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Default Bread prices redux

On 09/29/2011 08:22 AM, gloria.p wrote:
On 9/29/2011 5:38 AM, Nad wrote:

A food preserving forum talking about "buying" and freezing bread?
Do we not make our own bread? But make our own Jams and Juices?


I do make a couple of kinds of bread on occasion but haven't gotten into
making sandwich bread regularly. Convenience is the word.


We make most of our own bread, and I'm honestly not criticizing anyone
who doesn't, but I wanted to say that once you get into the routine of
doing it, it's not every inconvenient, especially if you use tools to
help with the one labor-intensive part, the kneading.

Serene
--
http://www.momfoodproject.com


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