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Old 05-01-2004, 05:54 PM
Shelora
 
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Default flowers as food

Hello again,
On my recent trip to Mexico we explored the Mixteca Alta region of
Oaxaca and were lucky to eat a dish made with the beautiful red flower
known as Colorin or Tzompantle. The tree was barren of leaves but
filled at the tip of the branches with clusters of small trumpet-like
red flowers. The base of the flower was like a triangular shaped
mushroom that held the red trumpets.
Served traditionally with scrambled eggs, they tasted like a cross
between a mushroom and wild rice.
Does anyone know the latin name of the tree or any other info?
Thanks,
Shelora

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Old 05-01-2004, 06:57 PM
David Wright
 
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Default flowers as food

On 5 Jan 2004 09:54:25 -0800, (Shelora)
wrote:

Hello again,
On my recent trip to Mexico we explored the Mixteca Alta region of
Oaxaca and were lucky to eat a dish made with the beautiful red flower
known as Colorin or Tzompantle. ...
Does anyone know the latin name of the tree or any other info?
Thanks,
Shelora


Shelora,

I had fun googling for this. My first find was a hit to one of my
favorite Mexican cooking sites:
http://tinyurl.com/36mtk

Then I played some more and came up with its scientific name,
_Erythrina americana_ (the Erythr- part means red -- as in
erythrocyte.)

Anyway, do a Google search on the scientific name, both web and image,
and you may learn more than any of us might want to know! ;-)

Thanks for the opportunity to learn about something I'd never heard
of.

David
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Old 05-01-2004, 10:53 PM
Puester
 
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Default flowers as food

Shelora wrote:

Hello again,
On my recent trip to Mexico we explored the Mixteca Alta region of
Oaxaca and were lucky to eat a dish made with the beautiful red flower
known as Colorin or Tzompantle. The tree was barren of leaves but
filled at the tip of the branches with clusters of small trumpet-like
red flowers. The base of the flower was like a triangular shaped
mushroom that held the red trumpets.
Served traditionally with scrambled eggs, they tasted like a cross
between a mushroom and wild rice.
Does anyone know the latin name of the tree or any other info?
Thanks,
Shelora




It sounds like a tree found in So. California
commonly called the Coral Tree. My tropical trees
guide is currently out on loan so I can't tell
you the botanical name.


gloria p
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Old 05-01-2004, 11:20 PM
Shelora
 
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Default flowers as food

Thanks, Pal. I'm off and running on google.
Shelora


David Wright wrote in message . ..
On 5 Jan 2004 09:54:25 -0800, (Shelora)
wrote:

Hello again,
On my recent trip to Mexico we explored the Mixteca Alta region of
Oaxaca and were lucky to eat a dish made with the beautiful red flower
known as Colorin or Tzompantle. ...
Does anyone know the latin name of the tree or any other info?
Thanks,
Shelora


Shelora,

I had fun googling for this. My first find was a hit to one of my
favorite Mexican cooking sites:
http://tinyurl.com/36mtk

Then I played some more and came up with its scientific name,
_Erythrina americana_ (the Erythr- part means red -- as in
erythrocyte.)

Anyway, do a Google search on the scientific name, both web and image,
and you may learn more than any of us might want to know! ;-)

Thanks for the opportunity to learn about something I'd never heard
of.

David

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Old 08-01-2004, 02:47 AM
Arturo
 
Posts: n/a
Default flowers as food

Hello again,
On my recent trip to Mexico we explored the Mixteca Alta region of
Oaxaca and were lucky to eat a dish made with the beautiful red flower
known as Colorin or Tzompantle. The tree was barren of leaves but
filled at the tip of the branches with clusters of small trumpet-like
red flowers. The base of the flower was like a triangular shaped
mushroom that held the red trumpets.
Served traditionally with scrambled eggs, they tasted like a cross
between a mushroom and wild rice.
Does anyone know the latin name of the tree or any other info?
Thanks,
Shelora



Sounds like a great trip! I'm not of much help on this one, but I wanted to pop
in and say hi.

Arturo


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