Mexican Cooking (alt.food.mexican-cooking) A newsgroup created for the discussion and sharing of mexican food and recipes.

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  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 21-10-2003, 06:11 PM
A1 WBarfieldsr
 
Posts: n/a
Default Waynes World for the working class

If you want to know why the Mexican people can't afford that refrigerator,
just go to these sites and see who promotes that unlivable low wage, so
those wealthy people can continue to rob the poor in Mexico..
http://www.bizwiz.com/cgi-bin/nwstor...=96nw353121618

http://www.bizwiz.com/cgi-bin/nwstor...=96nw354213652
"Wae Lundbergyn" wrote in message
...
A1, you are one stubborn old goat.


You are right on about being stubborn. That's how I got what I have.

I said there were 20 million extremely wealthy Mexicans who dominat the
whole economoy and politics of the country

I did misquote you on the amount of people, as I had already deleted that
post and I apologize. I also apologize to misschef for misquoting her.
I understand that those 20 million wealthy Mexicans could do pretty much
what ever they want to do. What I was trying to say is most of the
population in Mexico, Should be able to afford a ticket on an airplane. I
don't mean they would be able to rent a Lear jet, but at least fly economy
class. As far as the politics, there are allot more of the have nots than
those wealthy people. Like I said before, maybe The People need another
Poncho Villa, to help change those wealthy politicians minds, so everyone
can have a little money in there pockets. To me business and industry,
equals money. It seems to me most of that money is going into the wrong
pockets. The people need a leader who thinks of the people you and misschef
talk about. I believe the standard of living for the poor is way too low. I
also believe, what you never had, you don't miss it. Since great granddad
lived poor, the granddad lives poor, now the dad lives poor, and that trait
is passed on to the son, unless someone stands up and says No More. Someone
needs to teach the people how to stand up to the wealthy and change the
attitude of the Peoples government, so it works for the benefit of the poor
and not so much for the wealthy. If that factory owner is getting rich off
the labor of the people, then the people working for him should share in
that wealth. Then they will be able to afford that refrigerator and good
stove and every other thing that the rest of the world takes for granted.
We were talking in another news group about kitchen knives vs. chopping
gadgets and the guy opted to buy a set of very good German made knives, now
he probably paid over $100.00 dollars American. I don't think he went wrong
by spending that amount of money for a set of good knives that will last a
life time. However what would that have bought in Mexico, maybe a cheap
refrigerator. My point is we all advised this man to buy the knives because
we knew a knife was better than that chopper gadget. Who is teaching the
people in Mexico, that they could live a better life, and have a healthier
life, if they could keep their food from spoiling. If they have good health
regulations on the way the stores and markets handle the food, they may
just be able to save a trip to that market, because the meat and milk will
stay fresher longer. The people should insisted on a regulated minimum wage
that is enough to afford those things I have been talking about. I am not
trying to be arrogant, but what I here from you is, the rich get richer and
the poor don't know they are poor, since their dads and moms did it this
way and granddad and grandmother did it this way and so on and so on.
(snip)
I also said that there are 20 million on the bottom portion of the curve
regarding money; but that many of these 20 million do not work in a cash
economy. They remain pretty much agrarian and trade for what they need or
use a minimum amount of cash.

Why, because they were taught that this is the way it has always been,
teach the people that there is another way. Even if they work for the big
agricultural farms or ranches, they need to be able to have the same
amenities as the people living in the cities should have, and make at least
the same minimum wage. I have nothing against the recipes or the way the
food is prepared. What I'm saying is, let it be a choice to be without a
refrigerator, not because they can't afford one. If you work you should be
worth at the very least a livable wage, If the business doesn't see it that
way, organize and unite and don't work. If the United States trucking
industry shut down all trucking, the US would be on their knees within a
week. If the Mexican people united and refused to go to work I think it
would send a message to those in power.

Most of my recipes and food culture comes from these 20 million 'original'
Mexicans.
You have really been an arrogant asshole in this newsgroup and I don't
understand why most of us have not just put you in the kill file.

I haven't intentionally tried to harm anyone, if I have I apologize. I grew
up hard, and I did business with hard people in the beginning. I learned to
conduct business as hard as necessary to get the job done. If I stepped on
a few toes to stay in business then that's the way it went. I didn't let
any government run me out of business, If they wanted to play hardball I
played hardball. It wasn't always on the up and up, but if you set a goal,
you're going to have to fight what ever stands in your way to reach that
goal. I reached my goal and now I'm enjoying the rewards. I believe anyone
can do the same, so I have a hard time understanding how in the 21st.
century people can't afford a refrigerator, stove, TV or a computer, if
they want it bad enough. Of course they have to know they can get those
things that will improve their standard of living.
You call me an asshole, well I've been called worst, but I got the job done
when others stood around scratching their ass and trying to see how to be
nice and get it done. When I was a young man, you would not have wanted to
do business with me, the way you talk about teaching CEOs to conduct
business, but I sometimes didn't give that option.

But you come up with very interesting recipes which stimulate the
imagination and you do have innovative stuff.

Thanks for the comment about my recipes, some are the original, but allot
are changed to suit myself.

If only you could get off the ignorance of the culture you percieve from a
distance.
Come on down with me to a humble home anywhere in the interior of Mexico
and
I will show you what I write about. Beans are made on Sunday after the
family has gone to market. They start to ferment that night and that is
good
because it adds the right microbes to their tummys to fend off all kinds
of
nasty other bugs. All the rest of what I write about is true and not
fiction. I lived it, loved and yearn for it when nostalgic.

I believe you and that is what makes me angry. They don't have to live like
that. If they had money in their pockets and chose to live like that, then
that would be one thing, but if they live like that because they have to
live like that, then that, as I see it, is a shame. Not on the part of the
poor, but on the part of those wealthy people running the economy.

I know you can't tell just from reading, but their was a time when I
couldn't do what I can today. Like I said, I grew up the hard way. You talk
about people sitting around the table talking about the food and culture.
When I was growing up the quickest way to get slapped out of the chair, was
to talk at the table, you looked down at your plate while you ate so as not
to eat too slow. There were chores to do and very little time to complete
them, so the eating was cutting into that time.

Now, A1, learn to bend a little. Accept another culture and stop making

enemies when you're not really that bad a guy.

Wayne

I bend, and believe it or not, I have mellowed a great degree from my
youth. I could never say these things in public a few years ago, and I
taught my children to take a different approach to life and business. They
still work hard, but they didn't have to go down the same road I did. This
is the most I've talked to a stranger in a long time, lol. If I hurt
anyone's feelings, I don't intend to, I have just always spoke my mind.

--

William Barfieldsr
For some fun in the wind see my son's innovation at

www.modelsailcars.com -
Tacos served now and then



  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 21-10-2003, 09:51 PM
Douglas S. Ladden
 
Posts: n/a
Default Waynes World for the working class

A1 WBarfieldsr on 21 Oct 2003 suggested:

I reached my goal
and now I'm enjoying the rewards. I believe anyone can do the same,
so I have a hard time understanding how in the 21st. century people
can't afford a refrigerator, stove, TV or a computer, if they want it
bad enough. Of course they have to know they can get those things
that will improve their standard of living.


I just have a few things to comment here. First, having more
material goods does not necessarily improve your standard of living.
Simplicity, happiness and family are in many ways a much higher standard
of living than having material goods. And going to the markets, which are
clean and regulated and have fresh food, are more than just trips to buy
goods. They are also social events for the housewives and children. You
confuse, because you have been taught that way, quality of life with
wealth. From what I have seen and experienced, wealth actually seems to
lower quality of life and happiness, in most cases.

I renew my offer to show you Mexico, so that you can learn the
realities and get a better understanding of what you try to speak of, if
you're willing to pay for your education.

--Douglas
  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 21-10-2003, 10:36 PM
A1 WBarfieldsr
 
Posts: n/a
Default Waynes World for the working class

No thanks, the items I spoke of was not what I think the wealthy should
have, the items I spoke of, is what the common person should be able to
afford. I'm sure Grandma with her bad knees and arthritis along other
ailments, looks forward to climbing down stair-steps and long walks to the
market. Don't start with, other family members going for her, not every
grandma has other family members to run to the market every day. Still if
they Choose to live that way, more power to them, but if they Have to live
that way, because they can't afford to live any other way, then that is a
shame on the powers that keep them in poverty. I think people should live
the way it makes them happy, but if they are forced into poverty by the
powers that rule, then that is the shame.
--
William Barfieldsr
"Douglas S. Ladden" wrote in message
9.17...
A1 WBarfieldsr on 21 Oct 2003 suggested:

I reached my goal
and now I'm enjoying the rewards. I believe anyone can do the same,
so I have a hard time understanding how in the 21st. century people
can't afford a refrigerator, stove, TV or a computer, if they want it
bad enough. Of course they have to know they can get those things
that will improve their standard of living.


I just have a few things to comment here. First, having more
material goods does not necessarily improve your standard of living.
Simplicity, happiness and family are in many ways a much higher standard
of living than having material goods. And going to the markets, which

are
clean and regulated and have fresh food, are more than just trips to buy
goods. They are also social events for the housewives and children. You
confuse, because you have been taught that way, quality of life with
wealth. From what I have seen and experienced, wealth actually seems to
lower quality of life and happiness, in most cases.

I renew my offer to show you Mexico, so that you can learn the
realities and get a better understanding of what you try to speak of, if
you're willing to pay for your education.

--Douglas


  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 21-10-2003, 11:15 PM
A1 WBarfieldsr
 
Posts: n/a
Default Waynes World for the working class

"A1 WBarfieldsr" wrote in message
...
No thanks, the items I spoke of was not what I think the wealthy should
have, the items I spoke of, is what the common person should be able to
afford. I'm sure Grandma with her bad knees and arthritis along other
ailments, looks forward to climbing down stair-steps and long walks to

the
market. Don't start with, other family members going for her, not every
grandma has other family members to run to the market every day. Still if
they Choose to live that way, more power to them, but if they Have to

live
that way, because they can't afford to live any other way, then that is a
shame on the powers that keep them in poverty. I think people should live
the way it makes them happy, but if they are forced into poverty by the
powers that rule, then that is the shame.
--
William Barfieldsr
"Douglas S. Ladden" wrote in message
9.17...
I just have a few things to comment here. First, having more

material goods does not necessarily improve your standard of living.
Simplicity, happiness and family are in many ways a much higher

standard
of living than having material goods. And going to the markets, which

are
clean and regulated and have fresh food, are more than just trips to

buy
goods. They are also social events for the housewives and children.

You
confuse, because you have been taught that way, quality of life with
wealth. From what I have seen and experienced, wealth actually seems

to
lower quality of life and happiness, in most cases.

I renew my offer to show you Mexico, so that you can learn the
realities and get a better understanding of what you try to speak of,

if
you're willing to pay for your education.

--Douglas

************************************************** *************************
*******************
Mexico minimum wage increase
La Prensa

The Mexican government increased the minimum wage base by 10%. The increase
will bring the 1999 minimum of 34.50 pesos ($3.63) per day to 37.90 pesos
($3.99) per day. Roughly 20 percent of Mexico's work force earns the
minimum wage. Inflation currently at 12.03%.
http://pub136.ezboard.com/fcomebuild...opicID=3.topic
************************************************** *************************
*******************
MEXICO'S MINIMUM WAGE COMMISSION APPROVES 4.5 PERCENT INCREASE IN RATE


The daily minimum wage rate for Mexico in 2003 increases to 43.65 pesos, or
about $4.27, in the nation's most industrialized regions. However, because
of depreciation in the value of the Mexican peso over the last year, the
minimum wage at the start of 2003 in U.S. dollars will be lower than it was
at the beginning of 2002, when it was $4.58 per day
The National Minimum Wage Commission approved the 4.5 percent average
increase Dec. 19, setting the rate in less industrialized areas at 40.3
pesos, or about $4 a day.

01/02/2003
http://www.apawestmichigan.org/newsletter.cfm?get=1400
************************************************** *************************
*******************
SUNS 4347 Thursday 17 December 1998

MEXICO: MINIMUM WAGE NOT ENOUGH TO BUY FOOD

Mexico, Dec 15 (IPS/Diego Cevallos) -- Despite a recent increase of 14
percent, Mexico's minimum wage is still not enough to buy food with,
according to calculations by university researchers here.

In the past 14 years, the amount of money it takes to feed a family of four
has shot up by 1,727 percent, experts from the National Autonomous
University of Mexico (UNAM) have found, whereas the minimum wage has
increased by just 435.9 percent.

The researchers released their findings last week, on the heels of an
agreement between the government and employers to increase the national
minimum wage by 14 percent for the period December 1998 to December 1999.
The two sides agreed that sacrifices needed to be made to void fiscal
problems so it was not possible to give salary increases that were higher
than the inflation rate.

The 14-percent increase - which is not enough to buy a liter of milk - will
keep the wage index on the downward curve on which it has been since the
1980s. "The situation is dramatic for millions of workers who earn the
minimum wage," said Luis Lozano, director of the Center for
Multidisciplinary Studies of UNAM's Faculty of Economics.

Official studies show that 55 percent of workers who have social security -
less than 40 percent of the 37-million-strong potential workforce - earn
the equivalent of one to two minimum wages.

Despite the recent increase, the real minimum wage is lower than it was
just weeks ago. Due to the devaluation of the national currency, it has now
shrunk from $3.40 to $3.20 a day.

According to UNAM, Mexican workers now have salaries equivalent to 0.01
percent of what their counterparts earn in the United States. This
disparity has helped transform Mexico into a major exporter to its northern
neighbor, to which it sells more than 84 billion dollars' worth of goods
and services a year, with 40 percent coming from companies in its
export-processing zones.

The low salaries are only one indication of the precarious situation in
which Mexico's workers live. In recent years, they have also been buffeted
by repeated adjustment measures interspersed with calls for sacrifice,
Lozano told IPS.

Rogelio Martinez, director of the Center for Legal Studies at the Monterrey
Institute of Technology and Higher Studies, accuses the government of
violating the constitution on the minimum wage issue: by law, Mexico's
government is bound to guarantee its workers a minimum wage that satisfies
the material, social and cultural needs of the head of each household.

The main trade union federations, which are close to the government,
acknowledge that salaries are low but deny that they are precarious and
ought to be rejected by the population. Opposition trade unionists, a
growing minority, maintain that wages are far too low.

Still, despite the decline in wages, trade unions have never called out
workers on a general strike.

Wealth is also concentrated in just a few hands, according to figures from
the National Institute of Statistics, Geography and Computer Science: 10
percent of Mexicans own 41 percent of the country's wealth, while the
poorest fifth of the nation shares 3.2 percent of its wealth.

Things are not expected to improve in 1999 for Mexico's workers, especially
since economic prospects for next year look dim, given a sharp drop in the
prices of oil, which finances about 40 percent of the state budget.
http://www.sunsonline.org/trade/proc...8/12170698.htm
************************************************** *************************
*******************
The Impact of Minimum Wages in Mexico and Colombia
in Working Papers -- Labor & Employment. Labor market policies and
institutions. from World Bank
Linda A. Bell

Abstract: Comparative data from Mexico and Colombia are used to analyze the
impact of minimum wages. In Mexico, low levels of compliance and
ineffective levels of minimum wages imply negligible employment effects. In
Colombia, where the minimum wage is closer to the average wage in the
formal sector, the minimum wage has a significant impact on employment.


There are diverging views about how minimum wages affect labor markets in
developing countries.


Advocates of minimum wages hold that they redistribute resources in a
welfare-enhancing way, and can thus reduce poverty, improve productivity,
and foster growth. Opponents, on the other hand, contend that minimum wage
interventions result in a misallocation of labor and lead to depressed
wages in the very sectors --- the rural and informal urban sectors ---
where most of the poor are found, with the effect of wasting resources and
reducing the growth rate.


Data from Colombia and Mexico for the 1980s provide an opportunity to
evaluate the impact of minimum wages. In Mexico in the 1980s, the minimum
wage fell in real terms roughly 45 percent. By 1990, Mexico's minimum wage
was about 13 percent of the average unskilled manufacturing wage.


During the same period, the minimum wage in Colombia increased at nearly
the same rate, reaching roughly 53 percent of the average unskilled wage.


Bell charts how the mandated minimum wage affected the demand for skilled
and unskilled labor in both countries during that decade. She finds:


In Mexico, minimum wages have had virtually no effect on wages or
employment in the formal sector. The main reason: the minimum wage is not
an effective wage for most firms or workers. In the informal sector, in
turn, there is considerable noncompliance with the mandated minimum wage,
especially among part-time and female workers. As a result, significant
numbers of workers are paid at or below minimum wages.

In Colombia, minimum wages have a much stronger impact on wages, judging
from their proximity to the average wage and both cross-section and time
series estimates. The estimates imply that the elasticity of low-paid
unskilled employment with respect to minimum wages is in the range of 2 to
12 percent.


This paper --- a product of the Poverty and Human Resources Division,
Policy Research Department --- is part of a larger effort in the department
to analyze the implications of labor market distortions. The study was
funded by the Bank's Research Support Budget under the research project
"The Impact of Labor Market Policies and Institutions on Economic
Performance" (RPO 678-46). Copies of this paper are available free from the
World Bank, 1818 H Street NW, Washington, DC 20433. Please contact Sheila
Fallon, room N8-057, telephone 202-473-8009, fax 202-522-1153, Internet
address sfallon @worldbank.org (41 pages).
http://econpapers.hhs.se/paper/wopwobale/1514.htm
************************************************** *************************
*******************

Mexico sets small increase in country's meager minimum wage
ASSOCIATED PRESS December 22, 2000

Mexico City - Despite widespread dissatisfaction with low minimum wages
here, a quasi-government board granted workers an increase of only $0.25
cents per day (2.45 pesos) for 2001.

Starting Jan. 1, the lowest-paid employees - about 20 percent of Mexican
workers earn the minimum wage - will get 40.35 pesos per day, or about U.S.
dollars $4.21, a 6.5-percent increase from the current rate.

An announcer at Mexico City's AM Formato 21 radio station reacted with
shock to the decision, telling listeners to "call in, if you can think of
anything you can buy with two pesos."

The median salary *(not 'mean' or 'average') here *(Mexico City) is about
three times the minimum.

The increase was exactly in line with the government's inflation goal of
6.5 percent for 2001, meaning that, even if the government meets it's goal,
workers will see no real-term gains.

That comes on the heels of nearly two decades in which the purchasing power
of the minimum wage has steadily shrunk, losing about 75 percent of its
value since its peak in 1980.

The minimum wage level is set by a commission made up of government, labor
and business leaders. Labor leaders had earlier said they would demand a
double-digit salary hike, but apparently abandoned that position.

Workers in rural regions can be paid a sub-minimum wage of as little as
U.S. dollars $3.75 (35.85 pesos) per day under the new rate schedule.
http://www.dslextreme.com/users/surferslim/mexwage.html
************************************************** *************************
*******************
I rest my case.
--
William Barfieldsr

  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 21-10-2003, 11:45 PM
Steve Wertz
 
Posts: n/a
Default Waynes World for the working class

On Tue, 21 Oct 2003 17:11:12 GMT, "A1 WBarfieldsr"
wrote:

If you want to know why the Mexican people can't afford...


Bill, weren't you the one who got upset about somebody posting 12
words regarding a hot dog with saurkraut, because it wasn't considered
mexican cooking and hence, off-topic?

Hypocrite, again.

ObMexicanFood: Shredded pork taquitos dunked in Herdez Salsa Casera
tonight. Not only is Herdez probably the best commercial salsas, it
comes in a *can*!

-sw
z


  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 22-10-2003, 12:28 AM
A1 WBarfieldsr
 
Posts: n/a
Default Waynes World for the working class

No, I didn't get upset. I don't take these posts as serious as some. This
is just a way of entertaining myself, without letting little lizards like
you get under my skin. Sometimes, I'm not successful, but it's not from
failing to try.

--
William Barfieldsr
"Steve Wertz" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 21 Oct 2003 17:11:12 GMT, "A1 WBarfieldsr"
wrote:

If you want to know why the Mexican people can't afford...


Bill, weren't you the one who got upset about somebody posting 12
words regarding a hot dog with saurkraut, because it wasn't considered
mexican cooking and hence, off-topic?

Hypocrite, again.

ObMexicanFood: Shredded pork taquitos dunked in Herdez Salsa Casera
tonight. Not only is Herdez probably the best commercial salsas, it
comes in a *can*!

-sw
z


  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 22-10-2003, 06:41 AM
Jim Lane
 
Posts: n/a
Default Waynes World for the working class

A1 WBarfieldsr wrote:
"A1 WBarfieldsr" wrote in message
...

No thanks, the items I spoke of was not what I think the wealthy should
have, the items I spoke of, is what the common person should be able to
afford. I'm sure Grandma with her bad knees and arthritis along other
ailments, looks forward to climbing down stair-steps and long walks to


the

market. Don't start with, other family members going for her, not every
grandma has other family members to run to the market every day. Still if
they Choose to live that way, more power to them, but if they Have to


live

that way, because they can't afford to live any other way, then that is a
shame on the powers that keep them in poverty. I think people should live
the way it makes them happy, but if they are forced into poverty by the
powers that rule, then that is the shame.
--
William Barfieldsr
"Douglas S. Ladden" wrote in message
. 199.17...

I just have a few things to comment here. First, having more

material goods does not necessarily improve your standard of living.
Simplicity, happiness and family are in many ways a much higher


standard

of living than having material goods. And going to the markets, which


are

clean and regulated and have fresh food, are more than just trips to


buy

goods. They are also social events for the housewives and children.


You

confuse, because you have been taught that way, quality of life with
wealth. From what I have seen and experienced, wealth actually seems


to

lower quality of life and happiness, in most cases.

I renew my offer to show you Mexico, so that you can learn the
realities and get a better understanding of what you try to speak of,


if

you're willing to pay for your education.

--Douglas


************************************************** *************************
*******************
Mexico minimum wage increase
La Prensa

The Mexican government increased the minimum wage base by 10%. The increase
will bring the 1999 minimum of 34.50 pesos ($3.63) per day to 37.90 pesos
($3.99) per day. Roughly 20 percent of Mexico's work force earns the
minimum wage. Inflation currently at 12.03%.
http://pub136.ezboard.com/fcomebuild...opicID=3.topic
************************************************** *************************
*******************

MEXICO'S MINIMUM WAGE COMMISSION APPROVES 4.5 PERCENT INCREASE IN RATE



The daily minimum wage rate for Mexico in 2003 increases to 43.65 pesos, or
about $4.27, in the nation's most industrialized regions. However, because
of depreciation in the value of the Mexican peso over the last year, the
minimum wage at the start of 2003 in U.S. dollars will be lower than it was
at the beginning of 2002, when it was $4.58 per day
The National Minimum Wage Commission approved the 4.5 percent average
increase Dec. 19, setting the rate in less industrialized areas at 40.3
pesos, or about $4 a day.

01/02/2003
http://www.apawestmichigan.org/newsletter.cfm?get=1400
************************************************** *************************
*******************
SUNS 4347 Thursday 17 December 1998

MEXICO: MINIMUM WAGE NOT ENOUGH TO BUY FOOD

Mexico, Dec 15 (IPS/Diego Cevallos) -- Despite a recent increase of 14
percent, Mexico's minimum wage is still not enough to buy food with,
according to calculations by university researchers here.

In the past 14 years, the amount of money it takes to feed a family of four
has shot up by 1,727 percent, experts from the National Autonomous
University of Mexico (UNAM) have found, whereas the minimum wage has
increased by just 435.9 percent.

The researchers released their findings last week, on the heels of an
agreement between the government and employers to increase the national
minimum wage by 14 percent for the period December 1998 to December 1999.
The two sides agreed that sacrifices needed to be made to void fiscal
problems so it was not possible to give salary increases that were higher
than the inflation rate.

The 14-percent increase - which is not enough to buy a liter of milk - will
keep the wage index on the downward curve on which it has been since the
1980s. "The situation is dramatic for millions of workers who earn the
minimum wage," said Luis Lozano, director of the Center for
Multidisciplinary Studies of UNAM's Faculty of Economics.

Official studies show that 55 percent of workers who have social security -
less than 40 percent of the 37-million-strong potential workforce - earn
the equivalent of one to two minimum wages.

Despite the recent increase, the real minimum wage is lower than it was
just weeks ago. Due to the devaluation of the national currency, it has now
shrunk from $3.40 to $3.20 a day.

According to UNAM, Mexican workers now have salaries equivalent to 0.01
percent of what their counterparts earn in the United States. This
disparity has helped transform Mexico into a major exporter to its northern
neighbor, to which it sells more than 84 billion dollars' worth of goods
and services a year, with 40 percent coming from companies in its
export-processing zones.

The low salaries are only one indication of the precarious situation in
which Mexico's workers live. In recent years, they have also been buffeted
by repeated adjustment measures interspersed with calls for sacrifice,
Lozano told IPS.

Rogelio Martinez, director of the Center for Legal Studies at the Monterrey
Institute of Technology and Higher Studies, accuses the government of
violating the constitution on the minimum wage issue: by law, Mexico's
government is bound to guarantee its workers a minimum wage that satisfies
the material, social and cultural needs of the head of each household.

The main trade union federations, which are close to the government,
acknowledge that salaries are low but deny that they are precarious and
ought to be rejected by the population. Opposition trade unionists, a
growing minority, maintain that wages are far too low.

Still, despite the decline in wages, trade unions have never called out
workers on a general strike.

Wealth is also concentrated in just a few hands, according to figures from
the National Institute of Statistics, Geography and Computer Science: 10
percent of Mexicans own 41 percent of the country's wealth, while the
poorest fifth of the nation shares 3.2 percent of its wealth.

Things are not expected to improve in 1999 for Mexico's workers, especially
since economic prospects for next year look dim, given a sharp drop in the
prices of oil, which finances about 40 percent of the state budget.
http://www.sunsonline.org/trade/proc...8/12170698.htm
************************************************** *************************
*******************
The Impact of Minimum Wages in Mexico and Colombia
in Working Papers -- Labor & Employment. Labor market policies and
institutions. from World Bank
Linda A. Bell

Abstract: Comparative data from Mexico and Colombia are used to analyze the
impact of minimum wages. In Mexico, low levels of compliance and
ineffective levels of minimum wages imply negligible employment effects. In
Colombia, where the minimum wage is closer to the average wage in the
formal sector, the minimum wage has a significant impact on employment.


There are diverging views about how minimum wages affect labor markets in
developing countries.


Advocates of minimum wages hold that they redistribute resources in a
welfare-enhancing way, and can thus reduce poverty, improve productivity,
and foster growth. Opponents, on the other hand, contend that minimum wage
interventions result in a misallocation of labor and lead to depressed
wages in the very sectors --- the rural and informal urban sectors ---
where most of the poor are found, with the effect of wasting resources and
reducing the growth rate.


Data from Colombia and Mexico for the 1980s provide an opportunity to
evaluate the impact of minimum wages. In Mexico in the 1980s, the minimum
wage fell in real terms roughly 45 percent. By 1990, Mexico's minimum wage
was about 13 percent of the average unskilled manufacturing wage.


During the same period, the minimum wage in Colombia increased at nearly
the same rate, reaching roughly 53 percent of the average unskilled wage.


Bell charts how the mandated minimum wage affected the demand for skilled
and unskilled labor in both countries during that decade. She finds:


In Mexico, minimum wages have had virtually no effect on wages or
employment in the formal sector. The main reason: the minimum wage is not
an effective wage for most firms or workers. In the informal sector, in
turn, there is considerable noncompliance with the mandated minimum wage,
especially among part-time and female workers. As a result, significant
numbers of workers are paid at or below minimum wages.

In Colombia, minimum wages have a much stronger impact on wages, judging
from their proximity to the average wage and both cross-section and time
series estimates. The estimates imply that the elasticity of low-paid
unskilled employment with respect to minimum wages is in the range of 2 to
12 percent.


This paper --- a product of the Poverty and Human Resources Division,
Policy Research Department --- is part of a larger effort in the department
to analyze the implications of labor market distortions. The study was
funded by the Bank's Research Support Budget under the research project
"The Impact of Labor Market Policies and Institutions on Economic
Performance" (RPO 678-46). Copies of this paper are available free from the
World Bank, 1818 H Street NW, Washington, DC 20433. Please contact Sheila
Fallon, room N8-057, telephone 202-473-8009, fax 202-522-1153, Internet
address sfallon @worldbank.org (41 pages).
http://econpapers.hhs.se/paper/wopwobale/1514.htm
************************************************** *************************
*******************

Mexico sets small increase in country's meager minimum wage
ASSOCIATED PRESS December 22, 2000

Mexico City - Despite widespread dissatisfaction with low minimum wages
here, a quasi-government board granted workers an increase of only $0.25
cents per day (2.45 pesos) for 2001.

Starting Jan. 1, the lowest-paid employees - about 20 percent of Mexican
workers earn the minimum wage - will get 40.35 pesos per day, or about U.S.
dollars $4.21, a 6.5-percent increase from the current rate.

An announcer at Mexico City's AM Formato 21 radio station reacted with
shock to the decision, telling listeners to "call in, if you can think of
anything you can buy with two pesos."

The median salary *(not 'mean' or 'average') here *(Mexico City) is about
three times the minimum.

The increase was exactly in line with the government's inflation goal of
6.5 percent for 2001, meaning that, even if the government meets it's goal,
workers will see no real-term gains.

That comes on the heels of nearly two decades in which the purchasing power
of the minimum wage has steadily shrunk, losing about 75 percent of its
value since its peak in 1980.

The minimum wage level is set by a commission made up of government, labor
and business leaders. Labor leaders had earlier said they would demand a
double-digit salary hike, but apparently abandoned that position.

Workers in rural regions can be paid a sub-minimum wage of as little as
U.S. dollars $3.75 (35.85 pesos) per day under the new rate schedule.
http://www.dslextreme.com/users/surferslim/mexwage.html
************************************************** *************************
*******************
I rest my case.


Really, I don't think you understand what you have posted (and in
violation of copyright law, too, I'll bet). Square this article with
your statement about what the common person in Mexico SHOULD BE ABLE to
afford. About their refridgerators and stoves, while you're paradiong
your ignorance.


jim



  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 22-10-2003, 06:42 AM
Jim Lane
 
Posts: n/a
Default Waynes World for the working class

A1 WBarfieldsr wrote:

No, I didn't get upset. I don't take these posts as serious as some. This
is just a way of entertaining myself, without letting little lizards like
you get under my skin. Sometimes, I'm not successful, but it's not from
failing to try.


While we fall to the floor in gales of laughter at your mentalmidgetry
and ignorance.

Fitting.


jim

  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 22-10-2003, 11:15 AM
Dimitri
 
Posts: n/a
Default Waynes World for the working class


"A1 WBarfieldsr" wrote in message
...
If you want to know why the Mexican people can't afford that refrigerator,
just go to these sites and see who promotes that unlivable low wage, so
those wealthy people can continue to rob the poor in Mexico..
http://www.bizwiz.com/cgi-bin/nwstor...=96nw353121618


You sir are the embodiment of "The Ugly American".

Please reflect upon your attitudes and you will understand why in some
places Americans are hated.

Dimitri


  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 22-10-2003, 02:36 PM
Frogleg
 
Posts: n/a
Default Waynes World for the working class

A1 WBarfieldsr on 21 Oct 2003 suggested:

I reached my goal
and now I'm enjoying the rewards. I believe anyone can do the same,
so I have a hard time understanding how in the 21st. century people
can't afford a refrigerator, stove, TV or a computer, if they want it
bad enough. Of course they have to know they can get those things
that will improve their standard of living.


Gee whiz. Get your head out... There are billions of people in the
world who can't afford/don't have access to refrigerators or TVs or
ISPs or lawn services. Even in the US, where a reasonably stable
electricity supply is nearly universal. millions of people (yes,
millions) work full-time to achieve minimal food, shelter, and
clothing needs. Absent state regulations, US minimum wage is $5.15/hr.
That's $206 per 40-hr week. Before taxes. Let's see -- the usual
guideline for rent is 1/3rd income. That's almost $300 per month
(before taxes). Take a look at your 'for rent' classified pages. I
don't recall the guideline for food spending -- another 30%? Make up a
menu for 4. Health care? Transportation? School supplies and shoes for
kids? Utilities? And this is in the wealthiest nation in the world.

People (and there are plenty in the US) who buy their clothes at
Salvation Army stores and salvage furniture off the street (and work
at least 40 hrs per week) aren't lacking in determination or energy to
"want" computers and steaks and new cars.

Imagine a place where the non-regulated minimum wage is $1/hr. And a
refrigerator (much less the electric network to connect it) costs
$300.


  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 22-10-2003, 07:45 PM
A1 WBarfieldsr
 
Posts: n/a
Default Waynes World for the working class

"Dimitri" wrote in message
. com...

"A1 WBarfieldsr" wrote in message
...
If you want to know why the Mexican people can't afford that

refrigerator,
just go to these sites and see who promotes that unlivable low wage, so
those wealthy people can continue to rob the poor in Mexico..
http://www.bizwiz.com/cgi-bin/nwstor...=96nw353121618


You sir are the embodiment of "The Ugly American".

Please reflect upon your attitudes and you will understand why in some
places Americans are hated.

Dimitri

How on earth can a person be hated for wanting an improved life style for
those who wish it. If they don't want the better life style and want to
live without the convinces, that is great, they can put the money in a bank
and save it for hard times. What I am saying is the people should have a
choice in how they wish to live. Somehow you have missed what I'm saying. I
am saying people of any country should be able to choose their own standard
of living. What is bad about that? There have been remarks made about why
the industry in the US is coming to Mexico. It was said that a better
product is made there, and that may be true, it was said that cheaper labor
cost also played a roll. I say it was the biggest reason, when a company is
paying $15.00 per HOUR and can go to another country and get by with only
paying $5.00 per DAY. And what are the benefit packages that the companies
don't have to pay in Mexico or any other country where they can exploit the
labor force. I am not against the people of Mexico or any other country,
just the opposite is true. Are you serious, when you say the worker making
$5.00 per DAY would not be happier if they were making $7.00 or more per
HOUR, that to me is unconceivable.
Would you turn down that much of a raise in your pay check, NOT. People
that say "Money Isn't Everything", are usually the ones with the money.
Dolly Parton once said,"I've been poor and I've been rich, but Believe Me,
Richer is Better".
--

William Barfieldsr

  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 22-10-2003, 08:24 PM
Frogleg
 
Posts: n/a
Default Waynes World for the working class

On Wed, 22 Oct 2003 18:45:16 GMT, "A1 WBarfieldsr"
wrote:

How on earth can a person be hated for wanting an improved life style for
those who wish it. If they don't want the better life style and want to
live without the convinces, that is great, they can put the money in a bank
and save it for hard times. What I am saying is the people should have a
choice in how they wish to live. Somehow you have missed what I'm saying. I
am saying people of any country should be able to choose their own standard
of living.


Are you for real? Who do you think "chooses" poverty over wealth? I
must have missed sending in the form that says "if you'd rather live
in San Francisco with an income of $150,000 than in rural Nicaragua
with $3,000, please check this box."
  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 22-10-2003, 09:34 PM
Dimitri
 
Posts: n/a
Default Waynes World for the working class


"A1 WBarfieldsr" wrote in message
...
"Dimitri" wrote in message
. com...

"A1 WBarfieldsr" wrote in message
...
If you want to know why the Mexican people can't afford that

refrigerator,
just go to these sites and see who promotes that unlivable low wage,

so
those wealthy people can continue to rob the poor in Mexico..
http://www.bizwiz.com/cgi-bin/nwstor...=96nw353121618


You sir are the embodiment of "The Ugly American".

Please reflect upon your attitudes and you will understand why in some
places Americans are hated.

Dimitri



Obviously you just don't have a clue


How on earth can a person be hated for wanting an improved life style for
those who wish it. If they don't want the better life style and want to
live without the convinces, that is great, they can put the money in a

bank
and save it for hard times.


Whose Values? Yours or theirs?

What I am saying is the people should have a
choice in how they wish to live. Somehow you have missed what I'm saying.

I
am saying people of any country should be able to choose their own

standard
of living. What is bad about that?


Is called Communism and it doesn't work!

There have been remarks made about why
the industry in the US is coming to Mexico. It was said that a better
product is made there, and that may be true, it was said that cheaper

labor
cost also played a roll.


Why is that bad? How else do you help an economy to grow?

Johnson's "Great Society" while a good idea at the time only propogarted the
dissolotion of the family and "welfare generations".


I say it was the biggest reason, when a company is
paying $15.00 per HOUR and can go to another country and get by with only
paying $5.00 per DAY. And what are the benefit packages that the companies
don't have to pay in Mexico or any other country where they can exploit

the
labor force. I am not against the people of Mexico or any other country,
just the opposite is true. Are you serious, when you say the worker making
$5.00 per DAY would not be happier if they were making $7.00 or more per
HOUR, that to me is unconceivable.



I take it you flunked ECON 101.

Would you turn down that much of a raise in your pay check, NOT. People
that say "Money Isn't Everything", are usually the ones with the money.
Dolly Parton once said,"I've been poor and I've been rich, but Believe Me,
Richer is Better".
--

William Barfieldsr



Back to my original statement.

You sir are the embodiment of "The Ugly American".

Dimitri



  #14 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 22-10-2003, 09:41 PM
Jim Lane
 
Posts: n/a
Default Waynes World for the working class

Frogleg wrote:
On Wed, 22 Oct 2003 18:45:16 GMT, "A1 WBarfieldsr"
wrote:


How on earth can a person be hated for wanting an improved life style for
those who wish it. If they don't want the better life style and want to
live without the convinces, that is great, they can put the money in a bank
and save it for hard times. What I am saying is the people should have a
choice in how they wish to live. Somehow you have missed what I'm saying. I
am saying people of any country should be able to choose their own standard
of living.



Are you for real? Who do you think "chooses" poverty over wealth? I
must have missed sending in the form that says "if you'd rather live
in San Francisco with an income of $150,000 than in rural Nicaragua
with $3,000, please check this box."


Personally, I think we ought to nominate A1 as Usenet Kook of the Month.
Of course we would all have to vote for him, but he does fit the
requirements.


jim

  #15 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 22-10-2003, 09:53 PM
A1 WBarfieldsr
 
Posts: n/a
Default Waynes World for the working class




"Dimitri" wrote in message
m...

"A1 WBarfieldsr" wrote in message
...
"Dimitri" wrote in message
. com...

"A1 WBarfieldsr" wrote in message
...
If you want to know why the Mexican people can't afford that

refrigerator,
just go to these sites and see who promotes that unlivable low

wage,
so
those wealthy people can continue to rob the poor in Mexico..
http://www.bizwiz.com/cgi-bin/nwstor...=96nw353121618

You sir are the embodiment of "The Ugly American".

Please reflect upon your attitudes and you will understand why in

some
places Americans are hated.

Dimitri



Obviously you just don't have a clue


How on earth can a person be hated for wanting an improved life style

for
those who wish it. If they don't want the better life style and want to
live without the convinces, that is great, they can put the money in a

bank
and save it for hard times.


Whose Values? Yours or theirs?

What I am saying is the people should have a
choice in how they wish to live. Somehow you have missed what I'm

saying.
I
am saying people of any country should be able to choose their own

standard
of living. What is bad about that?


Is called Communism and it doesn't work!

There have been remarks made about why
the industry in the US is coming to Mexico. It was said that a better
product is made there, and that may be true, it was said that cheaper

labor
cost also played a roll.


Why is that bad? How else do you help an economy to grow?

Johnson's "Great Society" while a good idea at the time only propogarted

the
dissolotion of the family and "welfare generations".


I say it was the biggest reason, when a company is
paying $15.00 per HOUR and can go to another country and get by with

only
paying $5.00 per DAY. And what are the benefit packages that the

companies
don't have to pay in Mexico or any other country where they can exploit

the
labor force. I am not against the people of Mexico or any other

country,
just the opposite is true. Are you serious, when you say the worker

making
$5.00 per DAY would not be happier if they were making $7.00 or more

per
HOUR, that to me is unconceivable.



I take it you flunked ECON 101.

Would you turn down that much of a raise in your pay check, NOT. People
that say "Money Isn't Everything", are usually the ones with the money.
Dolly Parton once said,"I've been poor and I've been rich, but Believe

Me,
Richer is Better".
--

William Barfieldsr



Back to my original statement.

You sir are the embodiment of "The Ugly American".

Dimitri

And you sir are as dumb as a brick.
--

William Barfieldsr



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