General (rec.food.drink) For general discussions related to drink that are NOT appropriate for other forums.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 04-08-2005, 09:45 PM
Steve Johnsenson
 
Posts: n/a
Default Tea with Milk and Sugar (or Honey, Lemon, et·cet·er·a and so forth...

Are british style black teas like Earl Grey and English Breakfast the
only teas commonly served with milk and sugar?

Are there any chinese teas that get sweetened, creamed, or lemoned?


  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-08-2005, 12:56 AM
Aloke Prasad
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Every tea consumed in India is served with milk and sugar (lots of it :-)
It's mostly Assam or Darjeeling black teas.
--
Aloke
----
to reply by e-mail remove 123 and change invalid to com

"Steve Johnsenson" wrote in message
oups.com...
Are british style black teas like Earl Grey and English Breakfast the
only teas commonly served with milk and sugar?

Are there any chinese teas that get sweetened, creamed, or lemoned?



  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-08-2005, 01:23 AM
Ozzy
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Aloke Prasad" wrote in news:6XxIe.45373
:

Every tea consumed in India is served with milk and sugar (lots of it :-)
It's mostly Assam or Darjeeling black teas.



Indian chai, with milk, spice and Jaggery sugar -- yes indeed!

Chinese black tea can be served with milk (see
http://int.kateigaho.com/spr05/tea-chinese-black.html -- though I imagine
most dairy-eschewing Chinese don't do that -- still, the British
transplanted tea from China to Darjeeling & Assam in the first place, and
maybe they got the serving idea from China too.

The Tibetans drink black brick tea with butter, milk, and salt -- not bad,
actually, no matter how it sounds.

I don't know of any non-black Chinese tea traditionally served that way, but
then "I am only an egg" in the department of traditional Chinese teas.

Ozzy

  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-08-2005, 01:24 AM
Lara Burton
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Although I don't like sweetened tea, many mint green teas (esp. in North
Africa area, Middle East) are very sweet. I don't know if Chinese teas are
used there, however, in the US I've often seen gunpowder green flavored with
mint.

L
"Aloke Prasad" wrote in message
. ..
Every tea consumed in India is served with milk and sugar (lots of it :-)
It's mostly Assam or Darjeeling black teas.
--
Aloke
----
to reply by e-mail remove 123 and change invalid to com

"Steve Johnsenson" wrote in message
oups.com...
Are british style black teas like Earl Grey and English Breakfast the
only teas commonly served with milk and sugar?

Are there any chinese teas that get sweetened, creamed, or lemoned?





  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-08-2005, 02:47 AM
Scott Dorsey
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Steve Johnsenson wrote:
Are british style black teas like Earl Grey and English Breakfast the
only teas commonly served with milk and sugar?

Are there any chinese teas that get sweetened, creamed, or lemoned?


There are plenty of British-style teas that are actually Chinese.
Prince of Wales is secretly a Chinese black tea blend in disguise.
If you're into the whole cream thing, you could do it to a black
Yunnan too. It would have to be a pretty robust tea to stand up
to it, though.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."


  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-08-2005, 02:48 AM
Scott Dorsey
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Ozzy wrote:

The Tibetans drink black brick tea with butter, milk, and salt -- not bad,
actually, no matter how it sounds.


It's not just ANY butter, though.

It's YAK butter.

And it's not just any yak butter either.

It's RANCID yak butter.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-08-2005, 05:05 AM
Rob
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Most British people will add milk to any kind of black tea. They just
cannot imagine drinking tea without it. Historically, most of the tea
that was imported into Britain was Indian tea, like Assam, which is
very strong. Milk mellows it out a bit. It's become a habit with most
Brits (98% of them add milk to their tea), and they will add milk even
when trying a milder type of tea like Darjeeliing.

Most China Black teas do not need milk, IMO, but if you like it, feel
free to do so. For best results, make sure it is really milk - not
half-and-half, not coffee creamer, and not cream. Only "true" milk has
sufficient casein to bind with the tannin in tea. Cream and non-dairy
creamers will completely overwhelm the flavor of the tea.

  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-08-2005, 03:48 PM
Scott Dorsey
 
Posts: n/a
Default

James Butner wrote:

What about the oolongs? Do people ever sweeten them? (or add other stuff)


People do it, although I would consider it bad form personally.

In the mideast, a lot of folks drink black tea with mint, with a huge
amount of sugar added.
--scott

--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-08-2005, 08:50 PM
danube
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Only "true" milk has
sufficient casein to bind with the tannin in tea. Cream and non-dairy
creamers will completely overwhelm the flavor of the tea.


Maybe not quite so. East Friesian tea (mainly Kenian and Assam CTC) takes
cream very well and is very popular there on the shores of the North Sea.
There seems to be something with location: teas just taste different in
the various parts of the world, even if the herb comes from the same
tropical area.

JB


  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 08-08-2005, 07:00 AM
TeaDave
 
Posts: n/a
Default

perhaps the taste difference is related to the water used to make the
tea

I enjoy wonderful tea from my municipal water supply, as our water is
from mountain streams and melted snow, but I found that my tea did not
taste so well, and had different brewing results when I recently took a
trip to Minnesota.

Also, mineral contents vary all over this planet, so even filtering
water could produce different results in different places.

  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 08-08-2005, 07:47 AM
danube
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Sun, 07 Aug 2005 23:00:26 -0700, TeaDave wrote:

perhaps the taste difference is related to the water used to make the tea

I enjoy wonderful tea from my municipal water supply, as our water is from
mountain streams and melted snow, but I found that my tea did not taste so
well, and had different brewing results when I recently took a trip to
Minnesota.

Also, mineral contents vary all over this planet, so even filtering water
could produce different results in different places.


Yes, it's the water, then it's the food and the different sentiment. All
makes tea quite unpredictable and exciting.

JB
  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 11-08-2005, 04:39 PM
Oxymel of Squill
 
Posts: n/a
Default

unless you're a hippy in which case you slurp vegetarian margarine into tea
in an effort to keep your vibes pure. I've experienced it as Samye Ling!


"Scott Dorsey" wrote in message
...
Ozzy wrote:

The Tibetans drink black brick tea with butter, milk, and salt -- not bad,
actually, no matter how it sounds.


It's not just ANY butter, though.

It's YAK butter.

And it's not just any yak butter either.

It's RANCID yak butter.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."



  #14 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 01-09-2005, 06:19 PM
stePH
 
Posts: n/a
Default

There are plenty of British-style teas that are actually Chinese.
Prince of Wales is secretly a Chinese black tea blend in disguise.


I bought something called "Prince of Wales" at Teavana; it is mostly
black tea but with some green leaves in it. Dry, the green leaves look
a bit like "pinhead" gunpowder. A friend in Australia tells me that
his Prince of Wales contains oolong.

  #15 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 01-09-2005, 11:55 PM
Scott Dorsey
 
Posts: n/a
Default

stePH wrote:
There are plenty of British-style teas that are actually Chinese.
Prince of Wales is secretly a Chinese black tea blend in disguise.


I bought something called "Prince of Wales" at Teavana; it is mostly
black tea but with some green leaves in it. Dry, the green leaves look
a bit like "pinhead" gunpowder. A friend in Australia tells me that
his Prince of Wales contains oolong.


The traditional Prince of Wales is a blend of various black Chinese
teas. It might be kind of tippy if it's a good one, though.

Oolong in the blend is not traditional, but if it tastes right it
should be okay.
--scott

--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
It it right to add sugar into milk? emmy007 General Cooking 28 02-11-2011 02:28 AM
Honey Instead of Sugar Paul E. Lehmann Winemaking 3 10-07-2006 04:21 AM
Sugar to honey Bob General Cooking 2 13-09-2005 06:39 PM
Tea with Milk and Sugar (or Honey, Lemon, et·cet·er·a and so forth... Steve Johnsenson Tea 16 02-09-2005 03:01 AM
WHEAT,BEET SUGAR,CANE SUGAR,YELLOW CORN,MILK POWER,etc. krzysiek Marketplace 0 02-03-2004 09:33 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 10:48 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©2004-2022 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"

 

Copyright © 2017