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Stan Horwitz
 
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Default I hate electric ranges

About a year ago, my sister and her boyfriend (now husband) moved into a
home with an electric range in their kitchen. So, last night (New Years
Eve), I was up until around 1:30am making food for my dad's birthday
party, which my sister and I made at her house tonight.

I cook with gas appliances; always have. So, the meatballs turned out
great. I tried a few for breakfast. Delicious! This afternoon, I loaded
the pot of meatballs into my car along with numerous other food items
and drove to Jan and Rob's house. I got there right on time.

I proceeded to put the pot of meatballs on my sister's range to warm
them up. I cranked up her electric range to about 75% of maximum. A few
minutes later, meatballs are bubbling away, so I turned off the heat. I
realized I was late picking up a friend from a nearby train station, so
I asked my sister to check on the meatballs, then I drove over to pick
up my friend. I also did the same thing with the pot of homemade mac &
cheese I made this morning.

My sister calls me on my cell phone just as I arrived at the train
station. Jan told me the meatballs are incinerated! I asked Jan to taste
one. She does. Disgusting. While I was looking for my friend at the
train station, Jan and Rob tried to wash off the meatballs, thinking it
was the sauce that was burnt. No go. Fortunately, the train station is
adjacent to a nice supermarket. My friend Jen and I went into the
supermarket and I picked up three of those roasted chickens, and a roll
of paper towels (that my sister requested).

I got back to Jan and Rob's a few minutes later and Jan showed me that I
must have not turned off the burner, as I thought I had. It was still
on, but not on the high setting. I had no idea because the red color of
the burner element went off, so I thought it was reasonably cool. If it
was gas, I could have easily seen that the burner was not off.
Fortunately, I did not make that mistake with the pot of mac & cheese,
so it came out fine and it was a big hit at the party.

My sister consoled me and she said it took her a while to get used to
her electric range. Rob, the philosophy teacher (literally), also tried
to console me, by explaining that the outcome was the same either way,
in that we all got to enjoy some great food and nice company and we all
had a nice time. But I would have much preferred not to have to spend an
extra $20 on dinner (which my sister thanked me for), and I would have
preferred those meatballs go into the guests' tummies rather than a
garbage disposal. I will deal with the burnt pot tomorrow!

Did I mention, I hate electric ranges? Whomever thought up the idea of
an electric range out to be slaughtered and forced to eat my burned
meatballs!
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Dee Randall
 
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Default I hate electric ranges


"Stan Horwitz" > wrote in message
...
>
> Did I mention, I hate electric ranges? Whomever thought up the idea of
> an electric range out to be slaughtered and forced to eat my burned
> meatballs!


The only thing I like about an electric range is this:
On my jenn-air I have one side of the black raised solid elements. In the
winter they are great because they heat the room for 1-2 hours after you
turn them off. God forbid if you ever set anything down on them before
then. After they are cool, I leave a baking pan on top of them just in case
one gets turned on, it gives one a chance to not get burnt as badly; say if
you place your hand down on it.
But I do like to use them for long-slow cooking in the winter.

Sorry about your meatballs. Glad you didn't lose your pan.
Dee Dee


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Wayne Boatwright
 
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Default I hate electric ranges

On Sun 01 Jan 2006 08:57:52p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Stan
Horwitz?

> About a year ago, my sister and her boyfriend (now husband) moved into a
> home with an electric range in their kitchen. So, last night (New Years
> Eve), I was up until around 1:30am making food for my dad's birthday
> party, which my sister and I made at her house tonight.
>
> I cook with gas appliances; always have. So, the meatballs turned out
> great. I tried a few for breakfast. Delicious! This afternoon, I loaded
> the pot of meatballs into my car along with numerous other food items
> and drove to Jan and Rob's house. I got there right on time.
>
> I proceeded to put the pot of meatballs on my sister's range to warm
> them up. I cranked up her electric range to about 75% of maximum. A few
> minutes later, meatballs are bubbling away, so I turned off the heat. I
> realized I was late picking up a friend from a nearby train station, so
> I asked my sister to check on the meatballs, then I drove over to pick
> up my friend. I also did the same thing with the pot of homemade mac &
> cheese I made this morning.
>
> My sister calls me on my cell phone just as I arrived at the train
> station. Jan told me the meatballs are incinerated! I asked Jan to taste
> one. She does. Disgusting. While I was looking for my friend at the
> train station, Jan and Rob tried to wash off the meatballs, thinking it
> was the sauce that was burnt. No go. Fortunately, the train station is
> adjacent to a nice supermarket. My friend Jen and I went into the
> supermarket and I picked up three of those roasted chickens, and a roll
> of paper towels (that my sister requested).
>
> I got back to Jan and Rob's a few minutes later and Jan showed me that I
> must have not turned off the burner, as I thought I had. It was still
> on, but not on the high setting. I had no idea because the red color of
> the burner element went off, so I thought it was reasonably cool. If it
> was gas, I could have easily seen that the burner was not off.
> Fortunately, I did not make that mistake with the pot of mac & cheese,
> so it came out fine and it was a big hit at the party.
>
> My sister consoled me and she said it took her a while to get used to
> her electric range. Rob, the philosophy teacher (literally), also tried
> to console me, by explaining that the outcome was the same either way,
> in that we all got to enjoy some great food and nice company and we all
> had a nice time. But I would have much preferred not to have to spend an
> extra $20 on dinner (which my sister thanked me for), and I would have
> preferred those meatballs go into the guests' tummies rather than a
> garbage disposal. I will deal with the burnt pot tomorrow!
>
> Did I mention, I hate electric ranges? Whomever thought up the idea of
> an electric range out to be slaughtered and forced to eat my burned
> meatballs!


I'm sorry about your burned meatballs, and I understand your issues.

Did I ever mention, that I hate gas ranges and all other gas appliances?
If my home had a gas range, I would never ever cook until it had been
replaced with an electric range.

There are devotees to both fuels. Live and let live.

--
Wayne Boatwright **
__________________________________________________ ________________
And if we enter a room full of manure, may we believe in the pony.
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Dan Abel
 
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Default I hate electric ranges

In article >,
Wayne Boatwright > wrote:

> On Sun 01 Jan 2006 08:57:52p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Stan
> Horwitz?


> > minutes later, meatballs are bubbling away, so I turned off the heat. I
> > realized I was late picking up a friend from a nearby train station, so
> > I asked my sister to check on the meatballs



Sounds like your sister didn't do a very good job of checking on them.


:-(


> Did I ever mention, that I hate gas ranges and all other gas appliances?
> If my home had a gas range, I would never ever cook until it had been
> replaced with an electric range.
>
> There are devotees to both fuels. Live and let live.


I want one of each. That's my dream kitchen. My brother has a fancy
kitchen. It has a 5 burner gas rangetop and two wall electric ovens,
one a convection oven.

--
Dan Abel

Petaluma, California, USA
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Kathy in NZ
 
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Default I hate electric ranges

On Sun, 01 Jan 2006 22:57:52 -0500, Stan Horwitz >
wrote:


>Did I mention, I hate electric ranges? Whomever thought up the idea of
>an electric range out to be slaughtered and forced to eat my burned
>meatballs!



Sorry for your loss! I have always had electric ranges. In a perfect
world I would choose gas hobs but electric oven.

Kathy in NZ




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Edwin Pawlowski
 
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Default I hate electric ranges


"Stan Horwitz" > wrote in message
> Did I mention, I hate electric ranges? Whomever thought up the idea of
> an electric range out to be slaughtered and forced to eat my burned
> meatballs!


Agree. This house had one and I was happy to see it go after three years of
burnt offerings and dangerous overheating that my daughter did a few times.
Some people seem to have an un-natural fear of gas, but I've had no damage
from gas, but many problems, including a small fire, from electric.


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Default I hate electric ranges

On Sun, 01 Jan 2006 22:57:52 -0500, Stan Horwitz >
wrote:

You never see an electric cooktop in a restaurant kitchen. They are
always gas.

These chefs know what's best - so there's no argument.


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sf
 
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Default I hate electric ranges

On Sun, 01 Jan 2006 22:57:52 -0500, Stan Horwitz wrote:

> Did I mention, I hate electric ranges? Whomever thought up the idea of
> an electric range out to be slaughtered and forced to eat my burned
> meatballs!


I blame inanimate objects all the time, but it doesn't lessen my
personal contribution to the fiasco.
--

Practice safe eating. Always use condiments.
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sf
 
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Default I hate electric ranges

On 2 Jan 2006 05:17:49 +0100, Wayne Boatwright wrote:

> I'm sorry about your burned meatballs, and I understand your issues.
>
> Did I ever mention, that I hate gas ranges and all other gas appliances?
> If my home had a gas range, I would never ever cook until it had been
> replaced with an electric range.
>
> There are devotees to both fuels. Live and let live.


I love electric and distrust gas too. The only thing I think gas is
good for is great percolated coffee.
--

Practice safe eating. Always use condiments.
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Wayne Boatwright
 
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Default I hate electric ranges

On Sun 01 Jan 2006 10:34:18p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it ?

> On Sun, 01 Jan 2006 22:57:52 -0500, Stan Horwitz >
> wrote:
>
> You never see an electric cooktop in a restaurant kitchen. They are
> always gas.


I'm not cooking in a restaurant kitchen.

> These chefs know what's best - so there's no argument.


What is arguable is whether what is best in a restaurant kitchen is also best
for a home kitchen.

--
Wayne Boatwright **
__________________________________________________ ________________
And if we enter a room full of manure, may we believe in the pony.


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Tony P.
 
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Default I hate electric ranges

In article >,
says...
> About a year ago, my sister and her boyfriend (now husband) moved into a
> home with an electric range in their kitchen. So, last night (New Years
> Eve), I was up until around 1:30am making food for my dad's birthday
> party, which my sister and I made at her house tonight.
>
> I cook with gas appliances; always have. So, the meatballs turned out
> great. I tried a few for breakfast. Delicious! This afternoon, I loaded
> the pot of meatballs into my car along with numerous other food items
> and drove to Jan and Rob's house. I got there right on time.
>
> I proceeded to put the pot of meatballs on my sister's range to warm
> them up. I cranked up her electric range to about 75% of maximum. A few
> minutes later, meatballs are bubbling away, so I turned off the heat. I
> realized I was late picking up a friend from a nearby train station, so
> I asked my sister to check on the meatballs, then I drove over to pick
> up my friend. I also did the same thing with the pot of homemade mac &
> cheese I made this morning.
>
> My sister calls me on my cell phone just as I arrived at the train
> station. Jan told me the meatballs are incinerated! I asked Jan to taste
> one. She does. Disgusting. While I was looking for my friend at the
> train station, Jan and Rob tried to wash off the meatballs, thinking it
> was the sauce that was burnt. No go. Fortunately, the train station is
> adjacent to a nice supermarket. My friend Jen and I went into the
> supermarket and I picked up three of those roasted chickens, and a roll
> of paper towels (that my sister requested).
>
> I got back to Jan and Rob's a few minutes later and Jan showed me that I
> must have not turned off the burner, as I thought I had. It was still
> on, but not on the high setting. I had no idea because the red color of
> the burner element went off, so I thought it was reasonably cool. If it
> was gas, I could have easily seen that the burner was not off.
> Fortunately, I did not make that mistake with the pot of mac & cheese,
> so it came out fine and it was a big hit at the party.
>
> My sister consoled me and she said it took her a while to get used to
> her electric range. Rob, the philosophy teacher (literally), also tried
> to console me, by explaining that the outcome was the same either way,
> in that we all got to enjoy some great food and nice company and we all
> had a nice time. But I would have much preferred not to have to spend an
> extra $20 on dinner (which my sister thanked me for), and I would have
> preferred those meatballs go into the guests' tummies rather than a
> garbage disposal. I will deal with the burnt pot tomorrow!
>
> Did I mention, I hate electric ranges? Whomever thought up the idea of
> an electric range out to be slaughtered and forced to eat my burned
> meatballs!


It took me a month or so to get used to a gas stove. Ever since I'd
gotten my own place I'd cooked on electric stoves. I never thought I'd
appreciate them but now that I know the difference I'll take an electric
oven and a gas cook top.


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Ken Davey
 
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Default I hate electric ranges

sf wrote:
> On 2 Jan 2006 05:17:49 +0100, Wayne Boatwright wrote:
>
>> I'm sorry about your burned meatballs, and I understand your issues.
>>
>> Did I ever mention, that I hate gas ranges and all other gas
>> appliances? If my home had a gas range, I would never ever cook
>> until it had been replaced with an electric range.
>>
>> There are devotees to both fuels. Live and let live.

>
> I love electric and distrust gas too. The only thing I think gas is
> good for is great percolated coffee.


Sorry bud, there is no such thing as great' percolated coffee.
And - my vote is for gas.

Ken.


--
http://www.rupert.net/~solar
Return address supplied by 'spammotel'
http://www.spammotel.com


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Wayne Boatwright
 
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Default I hate electric ranges

On Sun 01 Jan 2006 11:31:46p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Ken Davey?

> sf wrote:
>> On 2 Jan 2006 05:17:49 +0100, Wayne Boatwright wrote:
>>
>>> I'm sorry about your burned meatballs, and I understand your issues.
>>>
>>> Did I ever mention, that I hate gas ranges and all other gas
>>> appliances? If my home had a gas range, I would never ever cook
>>> until it had been replaced with an electric range.
>>>
>>> There are devotees to both fuels. Live and let live.

>>
>> I love electric and distrust gas too. The only thing I think gas is
>> good for is great percolated coffee.

>
> Sorry bud, there is no such thing as great' percolated coffee.
> And - my vote is for gas.
>
> Ken.


I will gladly give you any gas I come across. <g>

As for percolated coffee, I used to like it back in the late 1960s, but
haven't even tasted it since then.

--
Wayne Boatwright **
__________________________________________________ ________________
And if we enter a room full of manure, may we believe in the pony.
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Melba's Jammin'
 
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Default I hate electric ranges

In article >,
Stan Horwitz > wrote:
> Did I mention, I hate electric ranges? Whomever thought up the idea of
> an electric range out to be slaughtered and forced to eat my burned
> meatballs!


(Stan's cremation story snipped)
I've cooked with both over the years and am accustomed to electric. Is
hers a new stove? Mine is not. I've heard that the newer ones are more
responsive to changes than the older ones. Of course, if you don't want
the burner on, you have to turn it off. "-) The lowest setting on my
burners will still burn a thick mixture if I don't stir and I set a
timer when I'm in the house to remind myself to stir. Try Dawn Power
Dissolver on the burned pot. Amazing stuff. I wonder why.
--
http://www.jamlady.eboard.com, updated 12-22-05
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Stan Horwitz
 
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Default I hate electric ranges

In article >,
Dan Abel > wrote:

> In article >,
> Wayne Boatwright > wrote:
>
> > On Sun 01 Jan 2006 08:57:52p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Stan
> > Horwitz?

>
> > > minutes later, meatballs are bubbling away, so I turned off the heat. I
> > > realized I was late picking up a friend from a nearby train station, so
> > > I asked my sister to check on the meatballs

>
>
> Sounds like your sister didn't do a very good job of checking on them.


Since I thought the heat elements were turned off and I told her so
before I drove over to pick up my friend, she had no reason to doubt me
.... until the burned smell started to waft through her kitchen!

>
> > Did I ever mention, that I hate gas ranges and all other gas appliances?
> > If my home had a gas range, I would never ever cook until it had been
> > replaced with an electric range.
> >
> > There are devotees to both fuels. Live and let live.

>
> I want one of each. That's my dream kitchen. My brother has a fancy
> kitchen. It has a 5 burner gas rangetop and two wall electric ovens,
> one a convection oven.


Does your brother actually use all that stuff?
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limey
 
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Default I hate electric ranges


"Ken Davey" wrote
>
> Sorry bud, there is no such thing as great' percolated coffee.
> And - my vote is for gas.
>
> Ken.


Hey, Happy New Year, Ken!! How are you feeling?

Dora


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sarah bennett
 
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Default I hate electric ranges

Dan Abel wrote:

>
> I want one of each. That's my dream kitchen. My brother has a fancy
> kitchen. It has a 5 burner gas rangetop and two wall electric ovens,
> one a convection oven.
>


that's a setup I'd love. I hate having the oven below the cooktop, and I
too, hate electric ranges with the fire of a thousand nuns

--

saerah

http://anisaerah.blogspot.com/

"Peace is not an absence of war, it is a virtue, a state of mind, a
disposition for benevolence, confidence, justice."
-Baruch Spinoza

"There is a theory which states that if ever anybody discovers exactly
what the Universe is for and why it is here, it will instantly disappear
and be replaced by something even more bizarre and inexplicable. There
is another theory which states that this has already happened."
-Douglas Adams
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limey
 
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Default I hate electric ranges


"sf" wrote:
>
> I love electric and distrust gas too. The only thing I think gas is
> good for is great percolated coffee.
> --


I've used electric ranges most of my life except for a stay in an apartment
when we were first married.
For safety, gas smells (from additives)! Up until the last three years,
I've always used electric ranges with conventional burners but must admit
I'd like to ditch my smoothtop, even though it's easy to clean. I find it
harder to regulate the heat than with any other electric range I've had. (so
there - here starts a whole new thread on smoothtop ranges.)

Dora


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limey
 
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Default I hate electric ranges


"limey" > wrote in message >
> I've used electric ranges most of my life except for a stay in an
> apartment when we were first married.
> For safety, gas smells (from additives)! Up until the last three years,
> I've always used electric ranges with conventional burners but must admit
> I'd like to ditch my smoothtop, even though it's easy to clean. I find
> it harder to regulate the heat than with any other electric range I've
> had. (so there - here starts a whole new thread on smoothtop ranges.)
>

I forgot to mention - we live beyond city gas lines so people are condemned
to large LPG tanks in the yard.

Dora


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Curly Sue
 
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Default I hate electric ranges

On Sun, 01 Jan 2006 22:57:52 -0500, Stan Horwitz >
wrote:
<snip>
>I got back to Jan and Rob's a few minutes later and Jan showed me that I
>must have not turned off the burner, as I thought I had. It was still
>on, but not on the high setting. I had no idea because the red color of
>the burner element went off, so I thought it was reasonably cool. If it
>was gas, I could have easily seen that the burner was not off.
>Fortunately, I did not make that mistake with the pot of mac & cheese,
>so it came out fine and it was a big hit at the party.
>
>My sister consoled me and she said it took her a while to get used to
>her electric range.


That's very true. I have had both over the years in apartments. With
the first electric I had, I also learned the hard way to watch very
carefully when turning burners on/off. A roommate had left a frying
pan with grease on the stove and I put a pot of tea on, but picked the
wrong dial. The pan with grease heated up and caught on fire.
Fortunately I was close by and smothered it with the lid.

I learned two lessons that day: 1. always wait to check the burner
to make sure that the one you want is on/off, and 2. always keep the
lid handy when frying even if you're not using it.

Both types of fuel are do-able; a lot depends on the situation. If
you live in a drafty castle with wind howling through the kitchen and
blowing out the flame ;> then an electric stove would be better.

Although I prefer gas, I had no problem adapting to electric in
various apartments. I think some of the issues people have with
either type are with cheap/old units or when switching from one fuel
to the other.

When I chose a new range for myself, I looked for and bought a gas
cooktop/gas oven. I was so happy the house had gas service so I
wasn't compelled to buy an electric range (or clothes dryer).

Sorry about the meatballs. I did get a chuckle out of the idea of
your sister washing them

Sue(tm)
Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!
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Nancy Young
 
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Default I hate electric ranges


"biig" > wrote

> Peter Huebner wrote:


>> Yeah, with professional grade equipment. Alas, I've two friends in whose
>> kitchen I HATE to cook, because they have gas tops. If there's the
>> slightest
>> breeze outside you have to close the windows, because you can no longer
>> get the
>> water to boil on their stove. At another friend's place the crossdraft
>> blows
>> the gas flame out alltogether.

>
> The only gas / propane stove I have ever used has been in our rv's
> we've had over the years. Breezes are definitely a problem. I have
> electric at home and always have. ....Sharon


I can't imagine this ... all the years I've had gas stoves, only had
an electric stove once and that was in my ex's apartment ... I
have *never* had the gas flame blow out. Wouldn't even cross
my mind it could happen.

Wonder why that is?

nancy


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EastneyEnder
 
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Default I hate electric ranges

Melba's Jammin' wrote:
> The lowest setting on my
> burners will still burn a thick mixture if I don't stir and I set a
> timer when I'm in the house to remind myself to stir.


Same here, I hate my electric cooker.

I have just bought a metal griddle thing though, which fits over the two
front electric hotplates... for cooking drop scones, pancakes or to use as a
griddle for eggs, bacon etc....

Now I wonder.... if I left that on there all the time, and put pans on
top.... might it dissipate the heat on the lowest setting.... enough not to
burn stuff?

I'll let you know.

--
Sue in Portsmouth,
"Old" Hampshire,
"Old" England, UK




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Bill
 
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Default I hate electric ranges

On Sun, 01 Jan 2006 22:57:52 -0500, Stan Horwitz >
wrote:

>About a year ago, my sister and her boyfriend (now husband) moved into a
>home with an electric range in their kitchen. So, last night (New Years
>Eve), I was up until around 1:30am making food for my dad's birthday
>party, which my sister and I made at her house tonight.
>
>I cook with gas appliances; always have. So, the meatballs turned out
>great. I tried a few for breakfast. Delicious! This afternoon, I loaded
>the pot of meatballs into my car along with numerous other food items
>and drove to Jan and Rob's house. I got there right on time.
>
>I proceeded to put the pot of meatballs on my sister's range to warm
>them up. I cranked up her electric range to about 75% of maximum. A few
>minutes later, meatballs are bubbling away, so I turned off the heat. I
>realized I was late picking up a friend from a nearby train station, so
>I asked my sister to check on the meatballs, then I drove over to pick
>up my friend. I also did the same thing with the pot of homemade mac &
>cheese I made this morning.
>
>My sister calls me on my cell phone just as I arrived at the train
>station. Jan told me the meatballs are incinerated! I asked Jan to taste
>one. She does. Disgusting. While I was looking for my friend at the
>train station, Jan and Rob tried to wash off the meatballs, thinking it
>was the sauce that was burnt. No go. Fortunately, the train station is
>adjacent to a nice supermarket. My friend Jen and I went into the
>supermarket and I picked up three of those roasted chickens, and a roll
>of paper towels (that my sister requested).
>
>I got back to Jan and Rob's a few minutes later and Jan showed me that I
>must have not turned off the burner, as I thought I had. It was still
>on, but not on the high setting. I had no idea because the red color of
>the burner element went off, so I thought it was reasonably cool. If it
>was gas, I could have easily seen that the burner was not off.
>Fortunately, I did not make that mistake with the pot of mac & cheese,
>so it came out fine and it was a big hit at the party.
>
>My sister consoled me and she said it took her a while to get used to
>her electric range. Rob, the philosophy teacher (literally), also tried
>to console me, by explaining that the outcome was the same either way,
>in that we all got to enjoy some great food and nice company and we all
>had a nice time. But I would have much preferred not to have to spend an
>extra $20 on dinner (which my sister thanked me for), and I would have
>preferred those meatballs go into the guests' tummies rather than a
>garbage disposal. I will deal with the burnt pot tomorrow!
>
>Did I mention, I hate electric ranges? Whomever thought up the idea of
>an electric range out to be slaughtered and forced to eat my burned
>meatballs!


can somebody tell me what it is about this stove that makes all the
rich people want to have one in their kitchen?
http://www.vikingrange.com/

I wonder what it does to make it cost four times as much a regular
stoves?

Bill


  #27 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
Sheldon
 
Posts: n/a
Default I hate electric ranges


Nancy Young wrote:
> "biig" > wrote
>
> > Peter Huebner wrote:

>
> >> Yeah, with professional grade equipment. Alas, I've two friends in whose
> >> kitchen I HATE to cook, because they have gas tops. If there's the
> >> slightest
> >> breeze outside you have to close the windows, because you can no longer
> >> get the
> >> water to boil on their stove. At another friend's place the crossdraft
> >> blows
> >> the gas flame out alltogether.

> >
> > The only gas / propane stove I have ever used has been in our rv's
> > we've had over the years. Breezes are definitely a problem. I have
> > electric at home and always have. ....Sharon

>
> I can't imagine this ... all the years I've had gas stoves, only had
> an electric stove once and that was in my ex's apartment ... I
> have *never* had the gas flame blow out. Wouldn't even cross
> my mind it could happen.
>
> Wonder why that is?


Can happen with the older style gas stoves that have pilot lights and
don't have sealed burners... especially when these old style stoves are
installed contrary to instructions and municipal code. When idiots
decide to install gas stanchions themselves and don't read the rules,
they place the gas supply so that the stove will be installed in front
of a window and/or next to exterior doorways. I had a neighbor whose
gas burners kept blowing out, when I moved the stove to check there was
a hole in the floor where the gas line came up from the basement large
enough for a cat to crawl through... any gas stove Users manual will
explain how there must be caulking around where the gas line enters.
It shouldn't take any exceptionally high IQ to realize that open flames
can be blown out. But it's been quite a few years now since gas stoves
have been manufactured that have pilot lights and more and more have
sealed burners, and with the newer burner designs it's near impossible
to blow out the flame.

  #28 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
Curly Sue
 
Posts: n/a
Default I hate electric ranges

On Mon, 2 Jan 2006 11:06:50 -0500, "Nancy Young" >
wrote:

>
>"biig" > wrote
>
>> Peter Huebner wrote:

>
>>> Yeah, with professional grade equipment. Alas, I've two friends in whose
>>> kitchen I HATE to cook, because they have gas tops. If there's the
>>> slightest
>>> breeze outside you have to close the windows, because you can no longer
>>> get the
>>> water to boil on their stove. At another friend's place the crossdraft
>>> blows
>>> the gas flame out alltogether.

>>
>> The only gas / propane stove I have ever used has been in our rv's
>> we've had over the years. Breezes are definitely a problem. I have
>> electric at home and always have. ....Sharon

>
>I can't imagine this ... all the years I've had gas stoves, only had
>an electric stove once and that was in my ex's apartment ... I
>have *never* had the gas flame blow out. Wouldn't even cross
>my mind it could happen.
>
>Wonder why that is?


Because they are in an RV. Plus, they are cooking with an RV stove.

I've never had problems with gas flames blowing out either. But I've
never had a kitchen with that kind of breeze. Hopefully they are not
talking about such a draft in the winter, but instead open windows in
mild weather. It would have to be a particular configuration, where a
strong air current blows across the stove or in a small area where the
breezes create significant turbulence. I don't have openable windows
in my kitchen, but if I did, if the breeze was so strong as to blow
out the flame, I'd close the windows while cooking anyway because it
would blow other stuff (flour, herbs) around. My kitchen door is on
the same wall as the stove so breezes do not blow across the stove.

Plus, there are stoves and there are stoves. Just like old electric
coils heat unevenly with hot spots, a gas stove without good
maintenance, eg. out of adjustment (poor air/gas mix), conceivably
could have problems in various situations. If you've ever used a
bunsen burner, you know that you can have a strong pointed flame or a
weak wavy flame (that will go out when someone walks by) depending on
how you adjust it.

Sue(tm)
Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!
  #29 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
Bill
 
Posts: n/a
Default I hate electric ranges

On 2 Jan 2006 06:42:58 +0100, Wayne Boatwright
> wrote:

>On Sun 01 Jan 2006 10:34:18p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it ?
>
>> On Sun, 01 Jan 2006 22:57:52 -0500, Stan Horwitz >
>> wrote:
>>
>> You never see an electric cooktop in a restaurant kitchen. They are
>> always gas.

>
>I'm not cooking in a restaurant kitchen.


go Wayne...you tell em!
>
>> These chefs know what's best - so there's no argument.

>
>What is arguable is whether what is best in a restaurant kitchen is also best
>for a home kitchen.


ah...keep going Wayne...you know come to think of it....every
restaurant kitchen I have ever been in had a gas range...there's got
to be a logical reason for this?

Bill


  #30 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
Curly Sue
 
Posts: n/a
Default I hate electric ranges

On Mon, 02 Jan 2006 16:45:16 GMT, EastneyEnder
> wrote:

>Melba's Jammin' wrote:
>> The lowest setting on my
>> burners will still burn a thick mixture if I don't stir and I set a
>> timer when I'm in the house to remind myself to stir.

>
>Same here, I hate my electric cooker.
>
>I have just bought a metal griddle thing though, which fits over the two
>front electric hotplates... for cooking drop scones, pancakes or to use as a
>griddle for eggs, bacon etc....
>
>Now I wonder.... if I left that on there all the time, and put pans on
>top.... might it dissipate the heat on the lowest setting.... enough not to
>burn stuff?
>
>I'll let you know.


When I had an electric stove I bought a couple of metal plates that
clipped onto the electric coils to soften and diffuse the heat. It
worked very well.

I also have "flame spreaders" that do the same for gas burners.

Sue(tm)
Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!


  #31 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
Sheldon
 
Posts: n/a
Default I hate electric ranges


Bill wrote:
> On Sun, 01 Jan 2006 22:57:52 -0500, Stan Horwitz >
> wrote:
>
> >About a year ago, my sister and her boyfriend (now husband) moved into a
> >home with an electric range in their kitchen. So, last night (New Years
> >Eve), I was up until around 1:30am making food for my dad's birthday
> >party, which my sister and I made at her house tonight.
> >
> >I cook with gas appliances; always have. So, the meatballs turned out
> >great. I tried a few for breakfast. Delicious! This afternoon, I loaded
> >the pot of meatballs into my car along with numerous other food items
> >and drove to Jan and Rob's house. I got there right on time.
> >
> >I proceeded to put the pot of meatballs on my sister's range to warm
> >them up. I cranked up her electric range to about 75% of maximum. A few
> >minutes later, meatballs are bubbling away, so I turned off the heat. I
> >realized I was late picking up a friend from a nearby train station, so
> >I asked my sister to check on the meatballs, then I drove over to pick
> >up my friend. I also did the same thing with the pot of homemade mac &
> >cheese I made this morning.
> >
> >My sister calls me on my cell phone just as I arrived at the train
> >station. Jan told me the meatballs are incinerated! I asked Jan to taste
> >one. She does. Disgusting. While I was looking for my friend at the
> >train station, Jan and Rob tried to wash off the meatballs, thinking it
> >was the sauce that was burnt. No go. Fortunately, the train station is
> >adjacent to a nice supermarket. My friend Jen and I went into the
> >supermarket and I picked up three of those roasted chickens, and a roll
> >of paper towels (that my sister requested).
> >
> >I got back to Jan and Rob's a few minutes later and Jan showed me that I
> >must have not turned off the burner, as I thought I had. It was still
> >on, but not on the high setting. I had no idea because the red color of
> >the burner element went off, so I thought it was reasonably cool. If it
> >was gas, I could have easily seen that the burner was not off.
> >Fortunately, I did not make that mistake with the pot of mac & cheese,
> >so it came out fine and it was a big hit at the party.
> >
> >My sister consoled me and she said it took her a while to get used to
> >her electric range. Rob, the philosophy teacher (literally), also tried
> >to console me, by explaining that the outcome was the same either way,
> >in that we all got to enjoy some great food and nice company and we all
> >had a nice time. But I would have much preferred not to have to spend an
> >extra $20 on dinner (which my sister thanked me for), and I would have
> >preferred those meatballs go into the guests' tummies rather than a
> >garbage disposal. I will deal with the burnt pot tomorrow!
> >
> >Did I mention, I hate electric ranges? Whomever thought up the idea of
> >an electric range out to be slaughtered and forced to eat my burned
> >meatballs!

>
> can somebody tell me what it is about this stove that makes all the
> rich people want to have one in their kitchen?
> http://www.vikingrange.com/
>
> I wonder what it does to make it cost four times as much a regular
> stoves?


Actually nothing... but folks with many more dollars than they know
what to do with typically puchase all sorts of over hyped things. And
sometimes there is just no anwer to a question... like my father could
never fathom why my mother needed a hundred pairs of shoes, most of
which she never wore.

  #32 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
Curly Sue
 
Posts: n/a
Default I hate electric ranges

On Mon, 02 Jan 2006 11:49:36 -0500, Bill >
wrote:

>can somebody tell me what it is about this stove that makes all the
>rich people want to have one in their kitchen?
>http://www.vikingrange.com/
>
>I wonder what it does to make it cost four times as much a regular
>stoves?


I have to say they are attractive.

Other than that, my guess is that rich people start looking at the top
end and don't worry about value. They never make it down to our price
range. They probably buy cars and watches the same way.

Sue(tm)
Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!
  #33 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
Nancy Young
 
Posts: n/a
Default I hate electric ranges


"Curly Sue" > wrote

> On Mon, 2 Jan 2006 11:06:50 -0500, "Nancy Young" >
> wrote:


>>"biig" > wrote
>>
>>> Peter Huebner wrote:

>>
>>>> Yeah, with professional grade equipment. Alas, I've two friends in
>>>> whose
>>>> kitchen I HATE to cook, because they have gas tops. If there's the
>>>> slightest
>>>> breeze outside you have to close the windows, because you can no longer
>>>> get the
>>>> water to boil on their stove. At another friend's place the crossdraft
>>>> blows
>>>> the gas flame out alltogether.
>>>
>>> The only gas / propane stove I have ever used has been in our rv's
>>> we've had over the years. Breezes are definitely a problem. I have
>>> electric at home and always have. ....Sharon

>>
>>I can't imagine this ... all the years I've had gas stoves, only had
>>an electric stove once and that was in my ex's apartment ... I
>>have *never* had the gas flame blow out. Wouldn't even cross
>>my mind it could happen.
>>
>>Wonder why that is?

>
> Because they are in an RV. Plus, they are cooking with an RV stove.


It doesn't sound as if Peter's friend's are RV kitchens.

> I've never had problems with gas flames blowing out either. But I've
> never had a kitchen with that kind of breeze. Hopefully they are not
> talking about such a draft in the winter, but instead open windows in
> mild weather. It would have to be a particular configuration, where a
> strong air current blows across the stove or in a small area where the
> breezes create significant turbulence.


I guess that must be it. I've never had a kitchen where it was
really breezy by the stove. Perhaps that would be a good
argument against stoves on an island?

> I don't have openable windows
> in my kitchen, but if I did, if the breeze was so strong as to blow
> out the flame, I'd close the windows while cooking anyway because it
> would blow other stuff (flour, herbs) around.


Very good point.

> could have problems in various situations. If you've ever used a
> bunsen burner, you know that you can have a strong pointed flame or a
> weak wavy flame (that will go out when someone walks by) depending on
> how you adjust it.


Yeah, I can see that, also I could see if the flame was so low as to
almost be invisible. That could go out easily.

On a related note, I saw this kitchen remodel on foodtv today,
the layout was *horrible* ... could not believe the people went to
all this trouble, supposedly professionals, and allow this situation.

The stove and the refrigerator were next to each other, right next
to each other, unavoidable sometimes but not ideal. These two
were, as far as I'm concerned, in the dining room of the place.
On the other side of the stove, nothing. It just butted out into
air. You could stand on two sides of this stove and cook.

It was just wrong, and there was another place they could have
put the stove. Even if that seems okay to someone, think about
this. Say you have a plate of food you want to put into a pan
that's on the stove. Hope you weren't planning on putting the plate
down while you did that ... no place to put anything down!

Just made me shake my head. Did I mention you had to go
between the stove/oven and a counter on the other side to get
into the kitchen? Just what I like, squeezing past a lit stove.

nancy




  #34 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
Nancy Young
 
Posts: n/a
Default I hate electric ranges


"Sheldon" > wrote

> Nancy Young wrote:


>> I can't imagine this ... all the years I've had gas stoves, only had
>> an electric stove once and that was in my ex's apartment ... I
>> have *never* had the gas flame blow out. Wouldn't even cross
>> my mind it could happen.
>>
>> Wonder why that is?

>
> Can happen with the older style gas stoves that have pilot lights and
> don't have sealed burners... especially when these old style stoves are
> installed contrary to instructions and municipal code. When idiots
> decide to install gas stanchions themselves and don't read the rules,
> they place the gas supply so that the stove will be installed in front
> of a window and/or next to exterior doorways.


That's what I was thinking, Sheldon. Perhaps the stove is in the
wrong place. I've seen layouts that made me think ... has the town
inspector seen this getup?

> It shouldn't take any exceptionally high IQ to realize that open flames
> can be blown out.j


Of course, I just never ran into a situation where it did on a
stove.

> But it's been quite a few years now since gas stoves
> have been manufactured that have pilot lights and more and more have
> sealed burners, and with the newer burner designs it's near impossible
> to blow out the flame.


Yeah, those are definitely improvements in design, much better
than they used to be.

nancy


  #35 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
notbob
 
Posts: n/a
Default I hate electric ranges

On 2006-01-02, Stan Horwitz > wrote:

> Did I mention, I hate electric ranges? Whomever thought up the idea of
> an electric range out to be slaughtered and forced to eat my burned
> meatballs!


Ya' gotta be smarter than the tool.

nb


  #36 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
Melba's Jammin'
 
Posts: n/a
Default I hate electric ranges

In article >,
EastneyEnder > wrote:

> Now I wonder.... if I left that on there all the time, and put pans on
> top.... might it dissipate the heat on the lowest setting.... enough not to
> burn stuff?
>
> I'll let you know.


Probably would.
--
http://www.jamlady.eboard.com, updated 1-1-2006, Sam I Am! and Hello!
  #37 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
Wayne Boatwright
 
Posts: n/a
Default I hate electric ranges

On Mon 02 Jan 2006 10:02:17a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Bill?

> On 2 Jan 2006 06:42:58 +0100, Wayne Boatwright
> > wrote:
>
>>On Sun 01 Jan 2006 10:34:18p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it ?
>>
>>> On Sun, 01 Jan 2006 22:57:52 -0500, Stan Horwitz >
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>> You never see an electric cooktop in a restaurant kitchen. They are
>>> always gas.

>>
>>I'm not cooking in a restaurant kitchen.

>
> go Wayne...you tell em!
>>
>>> These chefs know what's best - so there's no argument.

>>
>>What is arguable is whether what is best in a restaurant kitchen is also
>>best for a home kitchen.

>
> ah...keep going Wayne...you know come to think of it....every
> restaurant kitchen I have ever been in had a gas range...there's got
> to be a logical reason for this?


One of the reasons is economy, as gas is much cheaper to use commercially.
If I'm not mistaken, ocean liners use electricity primarily for safety
reasons, and they easily turn out huge volumes of generally excellent food.

All the years I lived at home my parents had gas ranges. I never really
liked cooking on them, and especially didn't like baking in the gas oven.
I didn't fully realize how much I disliked it until I had my first
apartment and had an electric cooktop and wall oven. When my mom helped me
cook a holiday meal in my apartment, the following week she bought an
electric range. Neither of us ever went back to gas.

Choice of one over the other is a very personal thing. As I said in an
earlier post, each has its devotees and detractors, for whatever reason.

Ignorance is a big issue when folks have cooking failures when cooking on
something unfamiliar. What gets me is that they blame the equipment rather
than their ignorance of how to use it. I can effectively cook on either
gas or electric and occasionally cook on friends' gas ranges without a
problem. I simply don't like to cook with gas and would consistently
refuse to have it in my home.

--
Wayne Boatwright **
__________________________________________________ ________________
And if we enter a room full of manure, may we believe in the pony.
  #38 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
Tony P.
 
Posts: n/a
Default I hate electric ranges

In article >, bigc300
@carolina.rr.com says...
> On Sun, 01 Jan 2006 22:57:52 -0500, Stan Horwitz >
> wrote:
>
> >About a year ago, my sister and her boyfriend (now husband) moved into a
> >home with an electric range in their kitchen. So, last night (New Years
> >Eve), I was up until around 1:30am making food for my dad's birthday
> >party, which my sister and I made at her house tonight.
> >
> >I cook with gas appliances; always have. So, the meatballs turned out
> >great. I tried a few for breakfast. Delicious! This afternoon, I loaded
> >the pot of meatballs into my car along with numerous other food items
> >and drove to Jan and Rob's house. I got there right on time.
> >
> >I proceeded to put the pot of meatballs on my sister's range to warm
> >them up. I cranked up her electric range to about 75% of maximum. A few
> >minutes later, meatballs are bubbling away, so I turned off the heat. I
> >realized I was late picking up a friend from a nearby train station, so
> >I asked my sister to check on the meatballs, then I drove over to pick
> >up my friend. I also did the same thing with the pot of homemade mac &
> >cheese I made this morning.
> >
> >My sister calls me on my cell phone just as I arrived at the train
> >station. Jan told me the meatballs are incinerated! I asked Jan to taste
> >one. She does. Disgusting. While I was looking for my friend at the
> >train station, Jan and Rob tried to wash off the meatballs, thinking it
> >was the sauce that was burnt. No go. Fortunately, the train station is
> >adjacent to a nice supermarket. My friend Jen and I went into the
> >supermarket and I picked up three of those roasted chickens, and a roll
> >of paper towels (that my sister requested).
> >
> >I got back to Jan and Rob's a few minutes later and Jan showed me that I
> >must have not turned off the burner, as I thought I had. It was still
> >on, but not on the high setting. I had no idea because the red color of
> >the burner element went off, so I thought it was reasonably cool. If it
> >was gas, I could have easily seen that the burner was not off.
> >Fortunately, I did not make that mistake with the pot of mac & cheese,
> >so it came out fine and it was a big hit at the party.
> >
> >My sister consoled me and she said it took her a while to get used to
> >her electric range. Rob, the philosophy teacher (literally), also tried
> >to console me, by explaining that the outcome was the same either way,
> >in that we all got to enjoy some great food and nice company and we all
> >had a nice time. But I would have much preferred not to have to spend an
> >extra $20 on dinner (which my sister thanked me for), and I would have
> >preferred those meatballs go into the guests' tummies rather than a
> >garbage disposal. I will deal with the burnt pot tomorrow!
> >
> >Did I mention, I hate electric ranges? Whomever thought up the idea of
> >an electric range out to be slaughtered and forced to eat my burned
> >meatballs!

>
> can somebody tell me what it is about this stove that makes all the
> rich people want to have one in their kitchen?
> http://www.vikingrange.com/
>
> I wonder what it does to make it cost four times as much a regular
> stoves?


I've had the oppportunity to use a Viking as compared to the crappy
apartment stove we have now.

I loved it. Constant and even heat, didn't suffer from anemia, and was a
full 36" model.

Total cost: $800 - which is solidly in the infield of my ballpark. It's
just that I don't want to haul it when we move.

  #39 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
Sheldon
 
Posts: n/a
Default I hate electric ranges


Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> On Mon 02 Jan 2006 10:02:17a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Bill?
>
> > On 2 Jan 2006 06:42:58 +0100, Wayne Boatwright
> > > wrote:
> >
> >>On Sun 01 Jan 2006 10:34:18p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it ?
> >>
> >>> On Sun, 01 Jan 2006 22:57:52 -0500, Stan Horwitz >
> >>> wrote:
> >>>
> >>> You never see an electric cooktop in a restaurant kitchen. They are
> >>> always gas.
> >>
> >>I'm not cooking in a restaurant kitchen.

> >
> > go Wayne...you tell em!
> >>
> >>> These chefs know what's best - so there's no argument.
> >>
> >>What is arguable is whether what is best in a restaurant kitchen is also
> >>best for a home kitchen.

> >
> > ah...keep going Wayne...you know come to think of it....every
> > restaurant kitchen I have ever been in had a gas range...there's got
> > to be a logical reason for this?

>
> One of the reasons is economy, as gas is much cheaper to use commercially.
> If I'm not mistaken, ocean liners use electricity primarily for safety
> reasons, and they easily turn out huge volumes of generally excellent food.


Large ships don't use ranges, don't even have any on board, no pots n'
pans either... quantities are way too large for pots n' pans.... they
do all that kind of cooking in steam jacketed kettles. They do have
ovens, banks and banks of commercial electric ovens, and banks and
banks of large commercial griddles, and banks and banks of large
commercial deep fat fryers... but no stove top cooking of any kind.
Large ships don't concern themselves with utility costs, steam and
electric generation is merely a by-product of running those massive
turbines, either use it or lose it.

  #40 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
aem
 
Posts: n/a
Default I hate electric ranges


Curly Sue wrote:
> On Sun, 01 Jan 2006 22: [snip]
>
> Although I prefer gas, I had no problem adapting to electric in
> various apartments. I think some of the issues people have with
> either type are with cheap/old units or when switching from one fuel
> to the other. [snip]


Yes, I think current models of both gas and electric stoves are pretty
good. I prefer gas for its speed and responsiveness, especially for
Chinese cooking. But I had to use an electric stove for several recent
years and found it was possible to get decent results with a little
extra work and attention. You put the largest burner on high and leave
it there, then regulate the wok's temperature by moving it off and on
the burner. -aem

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