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Wayne Boatwright
 
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Default I hate electric ranges

On Mon 02 Jan 2006 09:49:36a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Bill?

> On Sun, 01 Jan 2006 22:57:52 -0500, Stan Horwitz >
> wrote:
>
>>About a year ago, my sister and her boyfriend (now husband) moved into a
>>home with an electric range in their kitchen. So, last night (New Years
>>Eve), I was up until around 1:30am making food for my dad's birthday
>>party, which my sister and I made at her house tonight.
>>
>>I cook with gas appliances; always have. So, the meatballs turned out
>>great. I tried a few for breakfast. Delicious! This afternoon, I loaded
>>the pot of meatballs into my car along with numerous other food items
>>and drove to Jan and Rob's house. I got there right on time.
>>
>>I proceeded to put the pot of meatballs on my sister's range to warm
>>them up. I cranked up her electric range to about 75% of maximum. A few
>>minutes later, meatballs are bubbling away, so I turned off the heat. I
>>realized I was late picking up a friend from a nearby train station, so
>>I asked my sister to check on the meatballs, then I drove over to pick
>>up my friend. I also did the same thing with the pot of homemade mac &
>>cheese I made this morning.
>>
>>My sister calls me on my cell phone just as I arrived at the train
>>station. Jan told me the meatballs are incinerated! I asked Jan to taste
>>one. She does. Disgusting. While I was looking for my friend at the
>>train station, Jan and Rob tried to wash off the meatballs, thinking it
>>was the sauce that was burnt. No go. Fortunately, the train station is
>>adjacent to a nice supermarket. My friend Jen and I went into the
>>supermarket and I picked up three of those roasted chickens, and a roll
>>of paper towels (that my sister requested).
>>
>>I got back to Jan and Rob's a few minutes later and Jan showed me that I
>>must have not turned off the burner, as I thought I had. It was still
>>on, but not on the high setting. I had no idea because the red color of
>>the burner element went off, so I thought it was reasonably cool. If it
>>was gas, I could have easily seen that the burner was not off.
>>Fortunately, I did not make that mistake with the pot of mac & cheese,
>>so it came out fine and it was a big hit at the party.
>>
>>My sister consoled me and she said it took her a while to get used to
>>her electric range. Rob, the philosophy teacher (literally), also tried
>>to console me, by explaining that the outcome was the same either way,
>>in that we all got to enjoy some great food and nice company and we all
>>had a nice time. But I would have much preferred not to have to spend an
>>extra $20 on dinner (which my sister thanked me for), and I would have
>>preferred those meatballs go into the guests' tummies rather than a
>>garbage disposal. I will deal with the burnt pot tomorrow!
>>
>>Did I mention, I hate electric ranges? Whomever thought up the idea of
>>an electric range out to be slaughtered and forced to eat my burned
>>meatballs!

>
> can somebody tell me what it is about this stove that makes all the
> rich people want to have one in their kitchen?
> http://www.vikingrange.com/
>
> I wonder what it does to make it cost four times as much a regular
> stoves?


Status, most likely. I think most people who buy them rarely cook on them.
They go into vanity kitchens.

I read a story somewhere, maybe here, about a new home buyer who complained
that their high-end stove would work. As it turned out, the stove had
never been connected, even though the previous owner had lived there for
quite some time.

--
Wayne Boatwright **
__________________________________________________ ________________
And if we enter a room full of manure, may we believe in the pony.
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Wayne Boatwright
 
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Default I hate electric ranges

On Mon 02 Jan 2006 10:19:04a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Steve Wertz?

> On Sun, 01 Jan 2006 22:57:52 -0500, Stan Horwitz >
> wrote:
>
>>I got back to Jan and Rob's a few minutes later and Jan showed me that I
>>must have not turned off the burner, as I thought I had. It was still
>>on, but not on the high setting. I had no idea because the red color of
>>the burner element went off, so I thought it was reasonably cool.

>
> If the burner was red while you were re-heating your meatballs,
> then it was too high to begin with. You should only see red when
> boiling something.
>
> [Assuming these are the external coil element burners]


You can also see the red from the elements under a glass cooktop.

--
Wayne Boatwright **
__________________________________________________ ________________
And if we enter a room full of manure, may we believe in the pony.
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Wayne Boatwright
 
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Default I hate electric ranges

On Mon 02 Jan 2006 10:40:16a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it notbob?

> On 2006-01-02, Stan Horwitz > wrote:
>
>> Did I mention, I hate electric ranges? Whomever thought up the idea of
>> an electric range out to be slaughtered and forced to eat my burned
>> meatballs!

>
> Ya' gotta be smarter than the tool.
>
> nb
>


It's usually operator ignorance that causes problems.

--
Wayne Boatwright **
__________________________________________________ ________________
And if we enter a room full of manure, may we believe in the pony.
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Dee Randall
 
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Default I hate electric ranges

> Ignorance is a big issue when folks have cooking failures when cooking on
> something unfamiliar. What gets me is that they blame the equipment
> rather
> than their ignorance of how to use it. I can effectively cook on either
> gas or electric and occasionally cook on friends' gas ranges without a
> problem. I simply don't like to cook with gas and would consistently
> refuse to have it in my home.
>
> --
> Wayne Boatwright **



Based on your opinion, I'm going to re-think my issues with electric
cooking. I've not yet cooked with the flat tops, though I hope to get a new
stove this spring. I'm still in the dark about these stoves. But with some
research I hope to make a proper decision.
Dee Dee


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Dee Randall
 
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Default I hate electric ranges


"Wayne Boatwright" > wrote in message
...
> On Mon 02 Jan 2006 10:40:16a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it notbob?
>
>> On 2006-01-02, Stan Horwitz > wrote:
>>
>>> Did I mention, I hate electric ranges? Whomever thought up the idea of
>>> an electric range out to be slaughtered and forced to eat my burned
>>> meatballs!

>>
>> Ya' gotta be smarter than the tool.
>>
>> nb
>>

>
> It's usually operator ignorance that causes problems.
>
> --
> Wayne Boatwright **


Wayne, do you use this technique: When you want to get your pot a boilin',
then you want the pot ingredients to die down to a simmer, do you set the
pot off the stove while the burner temperature is lowering, or do you have
another lower temperature burner waiting to set it on for simmering. This
is my biggest complaint about cooking with electric and it drives me to a
frenzy.
Thanks,
Dee Dee




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Dee Randall
 
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Default I hate electric ranges


> I've had the oppportunity to use a Viking as compared to the crappy
> apartment stove we have now.
>
> I loved it. Constant and even heat, didn't suffer from anemia, and was a
> full 36" model.
>
> Total cost: $800 - which is solidly in the infield of my ballpark. It's
> just that I don't want to haul it when we move.


A viking for $800? or am I mis-reading?

Dee Dee


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notbob
 
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Default I hate electric ranges

On 2006-01-02, Dee Randall > wrote:

> is my biggest complaint about cooking with electric and it drives me to a
> frenzy.


Last I heard, no stove comes with a "frenzy" function. Again,
operator error.

nb
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Wayne Boatwright
 
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Default I hate electric ranges

On Mon 02 Jan 2006 12:18:31p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Dee
Randall?

>
> "Wayne Boatwright" > wrote in message
> ...
>> On Mon 02 Jan 2006 10:40:16a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it notbob?
>>
>>> On 2006-01-02, Stan Horwitz > wrote:
>>>
>>>> Did I mention, I hate electric ranges? Whomever thought up the idea
>>>> of an electric range out to be slaughtered and forced to eat my
>>>> burned meatballs!
>>>
>>> Ya' gotta be smarter than the tool.
>>>
>>> nb
>>>

>>
>> It's usually operator ignorance that causes problems.
>>
>> --
>> Wayne Boatwright **

>
> Wayne, do you use this technique: When you want to get your pot a
> boilin', then you want the pot ingredients to die down to a simmer, do
> you set the pot off the stove while the burner temperature is lowering,
> or do you have another lower temperature burner waiting to set it on for
> simmering. This is my biggest complaint about cooking with electric
> and it drives me to a frenzy.
> Thanks,
> Dee Dee


Well, you haven't had a chance to experience a smoothtop yet, but it's
easier for two reasons. First, the elements are more responsive and cool
down quicker. Second, you can easily position a pot partially on the
really hot element to reduce heat to the pot until the element has cooled
down some. No pot shifting to another element.

--
Wayne Boatwright **
__________________________________________________ ________________
And if we enter a room full of manure, may we believe in the pony.
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Wayne Boatwright
 
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Default I hate electric ranges

On Mon 02 Jan 2006 12:09:43p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Dee
Randall?

>> Ignorance is a big issue when folks have cooking failures when cooking
>> on something unfamiliar. What gets me is that they blame the equipment
>> rather than their ignorance of how to use it. I can effectively cook
>> on either gas or electric and occasionally cook on friends' gas ranges
>> without a problem. I simply don't like to cook with gas and would
>> consistently refuse to have it in my home.
>>
>> --
>> Wayne Boatwright **

>
>
> Based on your opinion, I'm going to re-think my issues with electric
> cooking. I've not yet cooked with the flat tops, though I hope to get a
> new stove this spring. I'm still in the dark about these stoves. But
> with some research I hope to make a proper decision.
> Dee Dee


Yes, do look at the smoothtop ranges/cooktops. The first one I had was a
Frigidaire back in 1994. I fell in love with one "pot boil". It had great
features and was very easy to cook on. It boiled a big pot of water faster
than either coils or a gas burner. When we moved in 2000 to AZ, I got a GE
Profile. It had more advanced features and was wonderful. With every year
the manufacturers seem to add nuances that enhance ease of control and
better cooking. You might consider a model that has at least one halogen
element, which gives you the ability of "instant on/instant off". I think
when you've had time to explore what's available, the choice will be clear.

Oh, another advantage of smoothtop models is that even less heat escapes
into the kitchen compared to coil elements and especially gas burners.
This is a big plus in my book.

--
Wayne Boatwright **
__________________________________________________ ________________
And if we enter a room full of manure, may we believe in the pony.
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sf
 
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Default I hate electric ranges

On Mon, 2 Jan 2006 00:31:46 -0600, Ken Davey wrote:

> sf wrote:
> > On 2 Jan 2006 05:17:49 +0100, Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> >
> >> I'm sorry about your burned meatballs, and I understand your issues.
> >>
> >> Did I ever mention, that I hate gas ranges and all other gas
> >> appliances? If my home had a gas range, I would never ever cook
> >> until it had been replaced with an electric range.
> >>
> >> There are devotees to both fuels. Live and let live.

> >
> > I love electric and distrust gas too. The only thing I think gas is
> > good for is great percolated coffee.

>
> Sorry bud, there is no such thing as great' percolated coffee.
> And - my vote is for gas.
>

Get your head out of your ass for once.
--

Practice safe eating. Always use condiments.


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sf
 
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Default I hate electric ranges

On 2 Jan 2006 07:44:51 +0100, Wayne Boatwright wrote:

> As for percolated coffee, I used to like it back in the late 1960s, but
> haven't even tasted it since then.


Nor have I Wayne. I was taught how to brew it by a local Arabic
coffee vendor and it's still the best coffee I've ever tasted, by far,
additionally everyone I served that style of coffee absolutely loved
it.
--

Practice safe eating. Always use condiments.
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Wayne Boatwright
 
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Default I hate electric ranges

On Mon 02 Jan 2006 12:44:24p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it notbob?

> On 2006-01-02, Dee Randall > wrote:
>
>> is my biggest complaint about cooking with electric and it drives me
>> to a frenzy.

>
> Last I heard, no stove comes with a "frenzy" function. Again,
> operator error.
>
> nb
>


hehehe! I can attest to that, but with a car not a stove. I once owned a
car with electric windows for eight years before I knew that by pressing the
button past the first detent to lower the driver's window would automatically
lower it without continuing to press the button. At first I thought I had
broken the button. DUH!

--
Wayne Boatwright **
__________________________________________________ ________________
And if we enter a room full of manure, may we believe in the pony.
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sf
 
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Default I hate electric ranges

On Mon, 02 Jan 2006 05:02:05 GMT, Kathy in NZ wrote:

> On Sun, 01 Jan 2006 22:57:52 -0500, Stan Horwitz >
> wrote:
>
>
> >Did I mention, I hate electric ranges? Whomever thought up the idea of
> >an electric range out to be slaughtered and forced to eat my burned
> >meatballs!

>
>
> Sorry for your loss! I have always had electric ranges. In a perfect
> world I would choose gas hobs but electric oven.
>

I know what you mean. If I ever remodel here or design a kitchen in a
new house, I'd have at least one gas burner. They are always good for
really fast or really hot... plus I hear their design is better now so
they don't have hot spots on low. My ideal would be four electric,
two gas and an indoor grill. The other plus is that gas is charged at
the same rate as my furnace. Electricity is more expensive.
--

Practice safe eating. Always use condiments.
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sf
 
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Default I hate electric ranges

On Mon, 02 Jan 2006 05:14:30 GMT, Edwin Pawlowski wrote:
>
> "Stan Horwitz" > wrote in message
> > Did I mention, I hate electric ranges? Whomever thought up the idea of
> > an electric range out to be slaughtered and forced to eat my burned
> > meatballs!

>
> Agree. This house had one and I was happy to see it go after three years of
> burnt offerings and dangerous overheating that my daughter did a few times.
> Some people seem to have an un-natural fear of gas, but I've had no damage
> from gas, but many problems, including a small fire, from electric.
>

That's because you're a putz, Ed. LOL Stan made the mistake and
blamed the stove. You're doing it too. Inanimate objects don't make
mistakes, their users do it all by themselves.
--

Practice safe eating. Always use condiments.
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sf
 
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Default I hate electric ranges

On 2 Jan 2006 06:42:58 +0100, Wayne Boatwright wrote:

> On Sun 01 Jan 2006 10:34:18p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it ?
>
> > On Sun, 01 Jan 2006 22:57:52 -0500, Stan Horwitz >
> > wrote:
> >
> > You never see an electric cooktop in a restaurant kitchen. They are
> > always gas.

>
> I'm not cooking in a restaurant kitchen.
>
> > These chefs know what's best - so there's no argument.

>
> What is arguable is whether what is best in a restaurant kitchen is also best
> for a home kitchen.


They want it fast, hot and cheap.... wait! What was it we were
talking about?
--

Practice safe eating. Always use condiments.


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Wayne Boatwright
 
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Default I hate electric ranges

On Mon 02 Jan 2006 01:12:50p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it sf?

> On Mon, 02 Jan 2006 05:02:05 GMT, Kathy in NZ wrote:
>
>> On Sun, 01 Jan 2006 22:57:52 -0500, Stan Horwitz >
>> wrote:
>>
>>
>> >Did I mention, I hate electric ranges? Whomever thought up the idea of
>> >an electric range out to be slaughtered and forced to eat my burned
>> >meatballs!

>>
>>
>> Sorry for your loss! I have always had electric ranges. In a perfect
>> world I would choose gas hobs but electric oven.
>>

> I know what you mean. If I ever remodel here or design a kitchen in a
> new house, I'd have at least one gas burner. They are always good for
> really fast or really hot... plus I hear their design is better now so
> they don't have hot spots on low. My ideal would be four electric,
> two gas and an indoor grill. The other plus is that gas is charged at
> the same rate as my furnace. Electricity is more expensive.


If you have an all-electric home and high-efficiency appliances (which we
do), you usually get a discount from the electric utility. Electricity is
a given in any home, while gas is definitely an option. If I had both, my
overall costs would be greater.

--
Wayne Boatwright **
__________________________________________________ ________________
And if we enter a room full of manure, may we believe in the pony.
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Wayne Boatwright
 
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Default I hate electric ranges

On Mon 02 Jan 2006 01:17:44p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it sf?

> On 2 Jan 2006 06:42:58 +0100, Wayne Boatwright wrote:
>
>> On Sun 01 Jan 2006 10:34:18p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it ?
>>
>> > On Sun, 01 Jan 2006 22:57:52 -0500, Stan Horwitz >
>> > wrote:
>> >
>> > You never see an electric cooktop in a restaurant kitchen. They are
>> > always gas.

>>
>> I'm not cooking in a restaurant kitchen.
>>
>> > These chefs know what's best - so there's no argument.

>>
>> What is arguable is whether what is best in a restaurant kitchen is
>> also best for a home kitchen.

>
> They want it fast, hot and cheap.... wait! What was it we were
> talking about?


You're a wicked creature!

--
Wayne Boatwright **
__________________________________________________ ________________
And if we enter a room full of manure, may we believe in the pony.
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sf
 
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Default I hate electric ranges

On 2 Jan 2006 21:19:03 +0100, Wayne Boatwright wrote:

>
> If you have an all-electric home and high-efficiency appliances (which we
> do), you usually get a discount from the electric utility. Electricity is
> a given in any home, while gas is definitely an option. If I had both, my
> overall costs would be greater.


Unfortunately our house isn't new... built in 1927. The furnace is
gas - so that's our "cheap" fuel. We have gas central heat and built
in electric room heaters which we use sparingly. The temp is usually
set at 58 and inside temps are 65 and under (depending on outside
temp). On a cold, wet day like today... I turn up the furnace to 64.
--

Practice safe eating. Always use condiments.
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Ken Davey
 
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Default I hate electric ranges

limey wrote:
> "Ken Davey" wrote
>>
>> Sorry bud, there is no such thing as great' percolated coffee.
>> And - my vote is for gas.
>>
>> Ken.

>
> Hey, Happy New Year, Ken!! How are you feeling?
>
> Dora



And a happy new year to you Dora!
Actually I am feeling better than I have for years - go figure.
Thanks for asking.

Ken.

--
http://www.rupert.net/~solar
Return address supplied by 'spammotel'
http://www.spammotel.com


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Ken Davey
 
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Default I hate electric ranges

sf wrote:
> On Mon, 2 Jan 2006 00:31:46 -0600, Ken Davey wrote:
>
>> sf wrote:
>> > On 2 Jan 2006 05:17:49 +0100, Wayne Boatwright wrote:
>> >
>> >> I'm sorry about your burned meatballs, and I understand your

>> issues. >>
>> >> Did I ever mention, that I hate gas ranges and all other gas
>> >> appliances? If my home had a gas range, I would never ever cook
>> >> until it had been replaced with an electric range.
>> >>
>> >> There are devotees to both fuels. Live and let live.
>> >
>> > I love electric and distrust gas too. The only thing I think gas

>> is > good for is great percolated coffee.
>>
>> Sorry bud, there is no such thing as great' percolated coffee.
>> And - my vote is for gas.
>>

> Get your head out of your ass for once.


Eh?

en.



--
http://www.rupert.net/~solar
Return address supplied by 'spammotel'
http://www.spammotel.com




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Sheldon
 
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Default I hate electric ranges


Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> On Mon 02 Jan 2006 01:12:50p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it sf?
>
> > On Mon, 02 Jan 2006 05:02:05 GMT, Kathy in NZ wrote:
> >
> >> On Sun, 01 Jan 2006 22:57:52 -0500, Stan Horwitz >
> >> wrote:
> >>
> >>
> >> >Did I mention, I hate electric ranges? Whomever thought up the idea of
> >> >an electric range out to be slaughtered and forced to eat my burned
> >> >meatballs!
> >>
> >>
> >> Sorry for your loss! I have always had electric ranges. In a perfect
> >> world I would choose gas hobs but electric oven.
> >>

> > I know what you mean. If I ever remodel here or design a kitchen in a
> > new house, I'd have at least one gas burner. They are always good for
> > really fast or really hot... plus I hear their design is better now so
> > they don't have hot spots on low. My ideal would be four electric,
> > two gas and an indoor grill. The other plus is that gas is charged at
> > the same rate as my furnace. Electricity is more expensive.

>
> If you have an all-electric home and high-efficiency appliances (which we
> do), you usually get a discount from the electric utility. Electricity is
> a given in any home, while gas is definitely an option. If I had both, my
> overall costs would be greater.


That's not necessarily true. The discount given for all-electric homes
is miniscule compared with the difference in cost between gas and
electric, which is significant... propane is like 1/3 the price of
electricity, natural gas is about 1/6 the cost of electric... so even
if you're given a 15% discount (which is extremely generous, usually
it's more like 5%) you're still not even close to equal. I already
looked into it... if I'd switch from my propane heat to electric heat I
couldn't afford to live here, well I could, just couldn't afford to eat
nearly as well... electric heat would run me about $6,000.00/yr more
than my propane. I would like electric heat, it's much cleaner, and
maintenence free then burning fossil fuel... but $500/mo buys a lot of
groceries. All electric is fine for a small cabin in the woods if you
only use it occasionally... or if you live in a hot climate where you
don't need heat... but if you use air conditioning gas A/C is far less
costly then electric, substantial if you live where A/C is used all
year. I really only use A/C about four months but if I used it all
year I'd switch over to a propane unit in a NY second.

The only real argument when comparing electric cooking to gas cooking
is about how important professional style cooking is to the
individual... it's just not possible to cook like a professional with
an electric cook top... cost is really not the issue.

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Dee Randall
 
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Default I hate electric ranges


"Wayne Boatwright" > wrote in message
...
> On Mon 02 Jan 2006 12:09:43p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Dee
> Randall?
>
>>> Ignorance is a big issue when folks have cooking failures when cooking
>>> on something unfamiliar. What gets me is that they blame the equipment
>>> rather than their ignorance of how to use it. I can effectively cook
>>> on either gas or electric and occasionally cook on friends' gas ranges
>>> without a problem. I simply don't like to cook with gas and would
>>> consistently refuse to have it in my home.

>>
>> Based on your opinion, I'm going to re-think my issues with electric
>> cooking. I've not yet cooked with the flat tops, though I hope to get a
>> new stove this spring. I'm still in the dark about these stoves. But
>> with some research I hope to make a proper decision.
>> Dee Dee

>
> Yes, do look at the smoothtop ranges/cooktops. The first one I had was a
> Frigidaire back in 1994. I fell in love with one "pot boil". It had
> great
> features and was very easy to cook on. It boiled a big pot of water
> faster
> than either coils or a gas burner. When we moved in 2000 to AZ, I got a
> GE
> Profile. It had more advanced features and was wonderful. With every
> year
> the manufacturers seem to add nuances that enhance ease of control and
> better cooking. You might consider a model that has at least one halogen
> element, which gives you the ability of "instant on/instant off". I think
> when you've had time to explore what's available, the choice will be
> clear.
>
> Oh, another advantage of smoothtop models is that even less heat escapes
> into the kitchen compared to coil elements and especially gas burners.
> This is a big plus in my book.
>
> --
> Wayne Boatwright **


Thanks, Wayne -- filed for reference in my 'stoves' file.

Oh, BTW what is this I am reading [teasing!]
"'Back in 1994..." Tee Hee
Dee Dee


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Daniel W. Rouse Jr.
 
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Default I hate electric ranges

"Stan Horwitz" > wrote in message
...
> In article >,
> Dan Abel > wrote:
>
> > In article >,
> > Wayne Boatwright > wrote:
> >
> > > On Sun 01 Jan 2006 08:57:52p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Stan
> > > Horwitz?

> >
> > > > minutes later, meatballs are bubbling away, so I turned off the

heat. I
> > > > realized I was late picking up a friend from a nearby train station,

so
> > > > I asked my sister to check on the meatballs

> >
> >
> > Sounds like your sister didn't do a very good job of checking on them.

>
> Since I thought the heat elements were turned off and I told her so
> before I drove over to pick up my friend, she had no reason to doubt me
> ... until the burned smell started to waft through her kitchen!
>

[snip...]

How old is the electric range?

The reason I ask is because I have a Hotpoint electric range that has what I
consider two different safety features.

1. The dial has to be pushed in to move from the OFF position to any heat
position.

2. A red light on the dial console labelled Surface Unit lights up when any
of the burners is in any heat position.

As such, turning a burner off results in an audible click as the dial pops
out and locks in the OFF position, and the Surface Unit light turns off when
all burners are in the OFF position. By extension, if any dial doesn't click
out and lock, it's not fully in the OFF position, and the Surface Unit light
will remain lit.


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Dee Randall
 
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Default I hate electric ranges


"sf" > wrote in message
...
> On 2 Jan 2006 07:44:51 +0100, Wayne Boatwright wrote:
>
>> As for percolated coffee, I used to like it back in the late 1960s, but
>> haven't even tasted it since then.

>
> Nor have I Wayne. I was taught how to brew it by a local Arabic
> coffee vendor and it's still the best coffee I've ever tasted, by far,
> additionally everyone I served that style of coffee absolutely loved
> it.
>

As I recall percolated coffee was never made strong (ly). I think most of
the coffee I used was was probably made with Maxwell House or S&F or
something similar; at any rate, nothing but canned ground coffee. In the
early 60's, we used to always take a tin/aluminum percolator coffee maker
when camping. It was heaven at the time.
Dee Dee


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Wayne Boatwright
 
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Default I hate electric ranges

On Mon 02 Jan 2006 02:30:16p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Dee
Randall?

>
> "Wayne Boatwright" > wrote in message
> ...
>> On Mon 02 Jan 2006 12:09:43p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Dee
>> Randall?
>>
>>>> Ignorance is a big issue when folks have cooking failures when
>>>> cooking on something unfamiliar. What gets me is that they blame the
>>>> equipment rather than their ignorance of how to use it. I can
>>>> effectively cook on either gas or electric and occasionally cook on
>>>> friends' gas ranges without a problem. I simply don't like to cook
>>>> with gas and would consistently refuse to have it in my home.
>>>
>>> Based on your opinion, I'm going to re-think my issues with electric
>>> cooking. I've not yet cooked with the flat tops, though I hope to get
>>> a new stove this spring. I'm still in the dark about these stoves.
>>> But with some research I hope to make a proper decision.
>>> Dee Dee

>>
>> Yes, do look at the smoothtop ranges/cooktops. The first one I had was
>> a Frigidaire back in 1994. I fell in love with one "pot boil". It had
>> great features and was very easy to cook on. It boiled a big pot of
>> water
>> faster than either coils or a gas burner. When we moved in 2000 to
>> AZ, I
>> got a GE
>> Profile. It had more advanced features and was wonderful. With every
>> year the manufacturers seem to add nuances that enhance ease of control
>> and better cooking. You might consider a model that has at least one
>> halogen element, which gives you the ability of "instant on/instant
>> off". I think when you've had time to explore what's available, the
>> choice will be clear.
>>
>> Oh, another advantage of smoothtop models is that even less heat
>> escapes into the kitchen compared to coil elements and especially gas
>> burners. This is a big plus in my book.
>>
>> --
>> Wayne Boatwright **

>
> Thanks, Wayne -- filed for reference in my 'stoves' file.
>
> Oh, BTW what is this I am reading [teasing!]
> "'Back in 1994..." Tee Hee
> Dee Dee


Sometimes it seems like forever ago. <g>

--
Wayne Boatwright **
__________________________________________________ ________________
And if we enter a room full of manure, may we believe in the pony.


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limey
 
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Default I hate electric ranges


"Wayne Boatwright" wrote

>>> Yes, do look at the smoothtop ranges/cooktops. The first one I had was
>>> a Frigidaire back in 1994. I fell in love with one "pot boil". It had
>>> great features and was very easy to cook on. >>> --
>>> Wayne Boatwright **

>>
>> Thanks, Wayne -- filed for reference in my 'stoves' file.
>>
>> Oh, BTW what is this I am reading [teasing!]
>> "'Back in 1994..." Tee Hee
>> Dee Dee

>
> Sometimes it seems like forever ago. <g>
>
> Wayne Boatwright


Wait until you get older, Wayne. It'll seem like only yesterday. ;-(

Dora


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Wayne Boatwright
 
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Default I hate electric ranges

On Mon 02 Jan 2006 03:01:12p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it limey?

>
> "Wayne Boatwright" wrote
>
>>>> Yes, do look at the smoothtop ranges/cooktops. The first one I had
>>>> was a Frigidaire back in 1994. I fell in love with one "pot boil".
>>>> It had great features and was very easy to cook on. >>> --
>>>> Wayne Boatwright **
>>>
>>> Thanks, Wayne -- filed for reference in my 'stoves' file.
>>>
>>> Oh, BTW what is this I am reading [teasing!]
>>> "'Back in 1994..." Tee Hee
>>> Dee Dee

>>
>> Sometimes it seems like forever ago. <g>
>>
>> Wayne Boatwright

>
> Wait until you get older, Wayne. It'll seem like only yesterday. ;-(
>
> Dora


Alas, I've already been touched by that, Dora. Like when I remember a
movie I saw, a song I heard, people I knew, or a certain family gathering,
and I think (sigh), was that really 35 years ago? Seems like yesterday!
:-(

My reference to "back in 1994" was mainly because a huge number things
have occurred and changes in my life in that relatively short 11-12 years.
It seems like it had to be longer ago than that for all those things to
have happened.

--
Wayne Boatwright **
__________________________________________________ ________________
And if we enter a room full of manure, may we believe in the pony.
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Peter Huebner
 
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Default I hate electric ranges

In article >,
says...
> Yes, do look at the smoothtop ranges/cooktops. The first one I had was a
> Frigidaire back in 1994. I fell in love with one "pot boil". It had great
> features and was very easy to cook on. It boiled a big pot of water faster
> than either coils or a gas burner. When we moved in 2000 to AZ, I got a GE
> Profile. It had more advanced features and was wonderful. With every year
> the manufacturers seem to add nuances that enhance ease of control and
> better cooking. You might consider a model that has at least one halogen
> element, which gives you the ability of "instant on/instant off". I think
> when you've had time to explore what's available, the choice will be clear.


Seconded. I have had an Italian flattop for about 5 years now, "DeLonghi" with
1 halogen element and this is easily the nicest stove I have ever cooked on.

The thing is, you need flat pots and pans. Which brings me to the following:

> Oh, another advantage of smoothtop models is that even less heat escapes
> into the kitchen compared to coil elements [snip]


Argh. I had a coil elements stove in this house when I bought it. The damn
thing has bent and buckled all my top grade pots over the years.

When I bought the first flattop I found it wouldn't work -- because the buckled
pots didn't conduct the heat off very well the thermostat in the elements would
turn the power off every few seconds. Frustrating to say the least.
I ended up giving all those pots to friends with gas stoves and replacing them.
<sigh> Everything is dandy with the new pots though (and the new stove; I_who_
had_become_we didn't like the first one which had unbelievably low
manufacturing standards "Fisher and Paykel" - burned out 3 switches in the
first year!!!).

'nuff rambling: the Boss says I've gotta go out & do some carpentry -P.

--
=========================================
firstname dot lastname at gmail fullstop com
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Curly Sue
 
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Default I hate electric ranges

On Mon, 2 Jan 2006 14:24:50 -0500, "Dee Randall"
> wrote:

>
>> I've had the oppportunity to use a Viking as compared to the crappy
>> apartment stove we have now.
>>
>> I loved it. Constant and even heat, didn't suffer from anemia, and was a
>> full 36" model.
>>
>> Total cost: $800 - which is solidly in the infield of my ballpark. It's
>> just that I don't want to haul it when we move.

>
>A viking for $800? or am I mis-reading?
>
>Dee Dee
>

That's what I thought too. Maybe it was used?

Sue(tm)
Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!


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hob
 
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Default I hate electric ranges


"Stan Horwitz" > wrote in message
...
> About a year ago, my sister and her boyfriend (now husband) moved into a
> home with an electric range in their kitchen. So, last night (New Years
> Eve), I was up until around 1:30am making food for my dad's birthday
> party, which my sister and I made at her house tonight.
>
> I cook with gas appliances; always have. So, the meatballs turned out
> great. I tried a few for breakfast. Delicious! This afternoon, I loaded
> the pot of meatballs into my car along with numerous other food items
> and drove to Jan and Rob's house. I got there right on time.
>
> I proceeded to put the pot of meatballs on my sister's range to warm
> them up. I cranked up her electric range to about 75% of maximum. A few
> minutes later, meatballs are bubbling away, so I turned off the heat. I
> realized I was late picking up a friend from a nearby train station, so
> I asked my sister to check on the meatballs, then I drove over to pick
> up my friend. I also did the same thing with the pot of homemade mac &
> cheese I made this morning.
>
> My sister calls me on my cell phone just as I arrived at the train
> station. Jan told me the meatballs are incinerated! I asked Jan to taste
> one. She does. Disgusting. While I was looking for my friend at the
> train station, Jan and Rob tried to wash off the meatballs, thinking it
> was the sauce that was burnt. No go. Fortunately, the train station is
> adjacent to a nice supermarket. My friend Jen and I went into the
> supermarket and I picked up three of those roasted chickens, and a roll
> of paper towels (that my sister requested).
>
> I got back to Jan and Rob's a few minutes later and Jan showed me that I
> must have not turned off the burner, as I thought I had. It was still
> on, but not on the high setting. I had no idea because the red color of
> the burner element went off, so I thought it was reasonably cool. If it
> was gas, I could have easily seen that the burner was not off.
> Fortunately, I did not make that mistake with the pot of mac & cheese,
> so it came out fine and it was a big hit at the party.
>
> My sister consoled me and she said it took her a while to get used to
> her electric range. Rob, the philosophy teacher (literally), also tried
> to console me, by explaining that the outcome was the same either way,
> in that we all got to enjoy some great food and nice company and we all
> had a nice time. But I would have much preferred not to have to spend an
> extra $20 on dinner (which my sister thanked me for), and I would have
> preferred those meatballs go into the guests' tummies rather than a
> garbage disposal. I will deal with the burnt pot tomorrow!
>
> Did I mention, I hate electric ranges? Whomever thought up the idea of
> an electric range out to be slaughtered and forced to eat my burned
> meatballs!


I imagine how you view an appliance depends to a great extent upon the
appliances and cookware you used when you learned to cook. I find no
difference in gas and electric and wood when using most of my pans (no thin
aluminum anywhere). Gas takes as long to heat my heavy commercial skillets
and cast iron as does electric.

However, I learned to cook with heavy cast iron and heavy top-grade
commercial pans - I suppose I then learned to control the heat actually
going into the food by using something other than a knob.

---------
Gas has its advantages, but IMHE only occasionally in the actual cooking
itself and never if you are using heavy pans: it has an advantage in net
cost of installation, especially in large BTU commercial kitchens; it has
the advantage in commercial operations in rapid control of multiple dishes,
e.g., where ten dishes using ten gas burners allow ten adjustments separated
without the attention to heat in each as is required of ten pans on a slow
reacting slab; and we- found gas tops easier to clean/more forgiving of
small spills in commercial kitchens. Electric has fewer clothing fires and
grease flares - and no combustible gases.

--------
I cook with heavy pans on gas, electric (all three kinds), wood stove, and
open fire without any noticeable problem switching.
It also seems that my friends who use gas at home also seem to prefer
thin aluminum pans.
They can't cook water using an wood fire or wood stove without burning
the pan. They have no clue about heat control when around an electric stove
or when camping, and they are forever sticking pans and hands into the
flames instead of using coals-and-logs, and poking sticks to change the
flame.
They have lost their knob, and with it went their cooking skills.

--------
Technically, when you turn the burner to 1200 BTU, the gas meter and the
electric meter spin as soon as you turn the knob.
A 1200 BTU gas burner and a 1200 BTU electric burner put the same amount
of heat into the food and the pan.
It takes the same amount of time to heat the pan and its contents
completely when you use the same BTU source .
In modern electric appliances, there is a few seconds lag while the element
cover heats. In wood stoves, there is a significant lag in the damper
adjustment

What IS missing from electric heat sources is the visual feedback - turn
up the electric, and you have to trust. Turn up the gas, and you instantly
see more flame.

-----------
It also seems that people who can cook with gas and not with electric
become very frustrated when the pan doesn't sizzle immediately after they
turn the knob -
Do they realize that the burner heat takes time to get to the middle of
the food, and all they are seeing is the outside getting hot?
I also swear that cooks who use gas stir food a lot more. I don't know
if its because they have to, or if its their nature.

fwiw


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Curly Sue
 
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Default I hate electric ranges

On 2 Jan 2006 19:07:24 +0100, Wayne Boatwright
> wrote:

>On Mon 02 Jan 2006 10:02:17a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Bill?
>
>> On 2 Jan 2006 06:42:58 +0100, Wayne Boatwright
>> > wrote:
>>
>>>On Sun 01 Jan 2006 10:34:18p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it ?
>>>
>>>> On Sun, 01 Jan 2006 22:57:52 -0500, Stan Horwitz >
>>>> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> You never see an electric cooktop in a restaurant kitchen. They are
>>>> always gas.
>>>
>>>I'm not cooking in a restaurant kitchen.

>>
>> go Wayne...you tell em!
>>>
>>>> These chefs know what's best - so there's no argument.
>>>
>>>What is arguable is whether what is best in a restaurant kitchen is also
>>>best for a home kitchen.

>>
>> ah...keep going Wayne...you know come to think of it....every
>> restaurant kitchen I have ever been in had a gas range...there's got
>> to be a logical reason for this?

>
>One of the reasons is economy, as gas is much cheaper to use commercially.
>If I'm not mistaken, ocean liners use electricity primarily for safety
>reasons, and they easily turn out huge volumes of generally excellent food.
>
>All the years I lived at home my parents had gas ranges. I never really
>liked cooking on them, and especially didn't like baking in the gas oven.
>I didn't fully realize how much I disliked it until I had my first
>apartment and had an electric cooktop and wall oven. When my mom helped me
>cook a holiday meal in my apartment, the following week she bought an
>electric range. Neither of us ever went back to gas.


Why? I've cooked with both and can't imagine why someone would run
out and buy an electric range after cooking on one, especially the
cooktop.

In a previous message you said:
>"If my home had a gas range, I would never ever cook until it had been
>replaced with an electric range. "


The differences are not so great as to cause such hysteria.

Could you be specific on what your problem is with gas ranges? I
really don't understand.

Sue(tm)
Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!
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The Cook
 
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Default I hate electric ranges

On Mon, 2 Jan 2006 14:18:31 -0500, "Dee Randall"
> wrote:

>
>"Wayne Boatwright" > wrote in message
.. .
>> On Mon 02 Jan 2006 10:40:16a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it notbob?
>>
>>> On 2006-01-02, Stan Horwitz > wrote:
>>>
>>>> Did I mention, I hate electric ranges? Whomever thought up the idea of
>>>> an electric range out to be slaughtered and forced to eat my burned
>>>> meatballs!
>>>
>>> Ya' gotta be smarter than the tool.
>>>
>>> nb
>>>

>>
>> It's usually operator ignorance that causes problems.
>>
>> --
>> Wayne Boatwright **

>
>Wayne, do you use this technique: When you want to get your pot a boilin',
>then you want the pot ingredients to die down to a simmer, do you set the
>pot off the stove while the burner temperature is lowering, or do you have
>another lower temperature burner waiting to set it on for simmering. This
>is my biggest complaint about cooking with electric and it drives me to a
>frenzy.
>Thanks,
>Dee Dee
>



I have used electric stoves all of my life. I only take a pot off the
burner if it is about to boil over. If you pay attention, you know
when to turn the heat down.

--
Susan N.

"Moral indignation is in most cases two percent moral,
48 percent indignation, and 50 percent envy."
Vittorio De Sica, Italian movie director (1901-1974
  #74 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Wayne Boatwright
 
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Default I hate electric ranges

On Mon 02 Jan 2006 04:03:32p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Curly Sue?

> On 2 Jan 2006 19:07:24 +0100, Wayne Boatwright
> > wrote:
>
>>On Mon 02 Jan 2006 10:02:17a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Bill?
>>
>>> On 2 Jan 2006 06:42:58 +0100, Wayne Boatwright
>>> > wrote:
>>>
>>>>On Sun 01 Jan 2006 10:34:18p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it ?
>>>>
>>>>> On Sun, 01 Jan 2006 22:57:52 -0500, Stan Horwitz >
>>>>> wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>> You never see an electric cooktop in a restaurant kitchen. They are
>>>>> always gas.
>>>>
>>>>I'm not cooking in a restaurant kitchen.
>>>
>>> go Wayne...you tell em!
>>>>
>>>>> These chefs know what's best - so there's no argument.
>>>>
>>>>What is arguable is whether what is best in a restaurant kitchen is
>>>>also best for a home kitchen.
>>>
>>> ah...keep going Wayne...you know come to think of it....every
>>> restaurant kitchen I have ever been in had a gas range...there's got
>>> to be a logical reason for this?

>>
>>One of the reasons is economy, as gas is much cheaper to use
>>commercially. If I'm not mistaken, ocean liners use electricity
>>primarily for safety reasons, and they easily turn out huge volumes of
>>generally excellent food.
>>
>>All the years I lived at home my parents had gas ranges. I never really
>>liked cooking on them, and especially didn't like baking in the gas
>>oven. I didn't fully realize how much I disliked it until I had my
>>first apartment and had an electric cooktop and wall oven. When my mom
>>helped me cook a holiday meal in my apartment, the following week she
>>bought an electric range. Neither of us ever went back to gas.

>
> Why? I've cooked with both and can't imagine why someone would run
> out and buy an electric range after cooking on one, especially the
> cooktop.
>
> In a previous message you said:
>>"If my home had a gas range, I would never ever cook until it had been
>>replaced with an electric range. "

>
> The differences are not so great as to cause such hysteria.
>
> Could you be specific on what your problem is with gas ranges? I
> really don't understand.


I'm sure a gas stove user will object to my reasons, but here goes. I find
gas combustion on any appliance to add certain levels of soil to the house.
Gas burners allow far more heat to escape the pan bottom around the edges.
Many, if not most, gas ranges have tipsy grates that lack the stability of
a solid top. Gas cooktops are more difficult to clean. In general, gas
ranges increase the room temperature in a kitchen more than electric.
There is less chance of fire when there is no exposed flame, and certainly
no chance of exploding gas. Lastly, why should I put up with even one of
these negatives when I can cook perfectly well on an electric range.

--
Wayne Boatwright **
__________________________________________________ ________________
And if we enter a room full of manure, may we believe in the pony.
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Wayne Boatwright
 
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Default I hate electric ranges

On Mon 02 Jan 2006 05:26:52p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Steve
Wertz?

> On 2 Jan 2006 19:37:15 +0100, Wayne Boatwright
> > wrote:
>
>>On Mon 02 Jan 2006 10:19:04a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Steve
>>Wertz?

>
>>> If the burner was red while you were re-heating your meatballs, then
>>> it was too high to begin with. You should only see red when boiling
>>> something.
>>>
>>> [Assuming these are the external coil element burners]

>>
>>You can also see the red from the elements under a glass cooktop.

>
> Elements under glass are sometimes an exception. That's why I
> noted it. They can be red and still not produce heat enough to
> cook with.


When the elements under the glass of my range glow read they are definitely
hot enough to boil water. It must depend on the individual range.

--
Wayne Boatwright **
__________________________________________________ ________________
And if we enter a room full of manure, may we believe in the pony.


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Joseph Littleshoes
 
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Default I hate electric ranges

hob wrote:

> "Stan Horwitz" wrote:
> > Did I mention, I hate electric ranges? Whomever thought up the idea

> of
> > an electric range out to be slaughtered and forced to eat my burned
> > meatballs!

>
> I imagine how you view an appliance depends to a great extent upon the
>
> appliances and cookware you used when you learned to cook.


I can still remember the joy me mum expressed when her wood fired
kitchen stove was replaced with electric back in the late 1950's.
Getting electric light and a hot water heater was nice also but she was
particularly enamoured of the electric stove. One of her least
favcorite things to do was to get up early, before everybody else, and
build a fire in that stove on a cold winter morning.

Some relatives still maintain that the food does not taste as good
cooked by electricity as it does by a wood fire and with fresh baked
bread i think there might even be something to it, a bit of flavour
being imparted by the wood fire.
---
JL

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Wayne Boatwright
 
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Default I hate electric ranges

On Mon 02 Jan 2006 06:52:48p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Dee
Randall?

>
> "Peter Huebner" > wrote in message
> t...
>> In article >,
>> says...
>>>
>>> Wayne, do you use this technique: When you want to get your pot a
>>> boilin', then you want the pot ingredients to die down to a simmer, do
>>> you set the pot off the stove while the burner temperature is
>>> lowering, or do you have another lower temperature burner waiting to
>>> set it on for simmering. This
>>> is my biggest complaint about cooking with electric and it drives me
>>> to a frenzy. Thanks,
>>> Dee Dee

>>
>> Ceramic cooktops are much more responsive than the solid element
>> electric ranges. The only time I shift from one element to another is
>> if I want to free up the fast front element for another pot (and set
>> the rice to keep warm on the
>> back burner). You can also half move a pot off the element to reduce
>> heat even more quickly if something is frothing up.
>>
>> Actually, this is a consideration: the ceramic ranges come in two
>> styles: buttons on the cooktop and buttons on a different panel - the
>> latter have much more space on the cooktop to move pots around. The
>> extra space is a big plus on
>> our second one, come to think of it.
>>
>> -P.

>
> Thanks so much fyi. Are you able to use (if you have them) cast iron
> skillets or dutch oven; if so, do you have to pick them up to move them,
> or can you scoot them to one side of a ceramic cooktop element.
> Dee Dee


All of my cast iron cookware is Le Creuset, but most of the bottoms are not
enamelled. They work great on a smoothtop, however my preference is to
pick them up insteading of sliding them. No point in tempting fate to have
the glass scratched. In fact, I pick up all pans to move them.

--
Wayne Boatwright **
__________________________________________________ ________________
And if we enter a room full of manure, may we believe in the pony.
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Paul M. Cook
 
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Default I hate electric ranges


> Did I mention, I hate electric ranges? Whomever thought up the idea of
> an electric range out to be slaughtered and forced to eat my burned
> meatballs!


It happens.

I have yet to completely get used to my GE gas range. Bought 2 years ago.
I love it. But the knobs turn counterclockwise from off to low. My old
Amana range which I used for 16 years turned clockwise. Not once I have
turned my GE range "off" by mindlessly rotating the knob counterclockwise to
the stop which is not off it is low simmer. I ruined a whole skillet full
of the best stuffed cabbage rolls I ever made the last time. The time
before that it was bean soup which had burned on so heavily to the pot 3
hours later that I practically had to sand blast it clean.

Paul


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Wayne Boatwright
 
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Default I hate electric ranges

On Mon 02 Jan 2006 07:38:41p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Paul M.
Cook?

>
>> Did I mention, I hate electric ranges? Whomever thought up the idea of
>> an electric range out to be slaughtered and forced to eat my burned
>> meatballs!

>
> It happens.
>
> I have yet to completely get used to my GE gas range. Bought 2 years
> ago. I love it. But the knobs turn counterclockwise from off to low.
> My old Amana range which I used for 16 years turned clockwise. Not once
> I have turned my GE range "off" by mindlessly rotating the knob
> counterclockwise to the stop which is not off it is low simmer. I
> ruined a whole skillet full of the best stuffed cabbage rolls I ever
> made the last time. The time before that it was bean soup which had
> burned on so heavily to the pot 3 hours later that I practically had to
> sand blast it clean.
>
> Paul


At least you didn't blame the stove, Paul. LOL! Sooo, the OP better beware
of gas ranges he hasn't used before, as well.

On the last electric range I used, the two knobs on each side of the
backsplash that control the front and rear elements on each side were
reversed from my own. It was easy to forget that I was turning on the rear
element when I thought I was turning on the front element.

As someone else posted... Operator Error. Don't blame the equipment,
folks.

--
Wayne Boatwright **
__________________________________________________ ________________
And if we enter a room full of manure, may we believe in the pony.
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