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  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 26-03-2005, 06:01 PM
--
 
Posts: n/a
Default The boiled egg test has just finished. Results. Not good.

In lieu of my "bring to boil and remove from and let sit in the water 15
minutes method", which cooks perfectly but has occasional peeling problems,
I tried the following and just finished the test:

8 fresh extra-large eggs (these hens were apparently fed only grain,
according to the carton)
4 quite old extra-large eggs (expiration date from last week -Mar 23)

self-defrost refrigerator is about 38 degrees, eggs in carton are stored on
top shelf near the fan

850 feet above sea level

cold tap water

pasta cooker (enamel, deep, fits the large burner completely - has an insert
that sits above the water for lifting pasta, an insert colander, and an
insert colander strainer-cover. I removed the colander equipment, using only
the insert.)

about 2-3" water, to just below and not touching the insert where the eggs
rest.

the eggs went into the insert and into the pot, then I put the water in the
pot and placed the covered pot on the stove, on high.

Just before water boiled, I turned the burner down to low (it kept the water
at a low boil and the pot was full of water vapor).

I timed from when the water boiled (from visual check and by sound)

12 minutes steamed (the eggs were extra large, and I plan to devil them if
they cook fully, so I guessed an extra two minutes more than large eggs)

12 minutes resting

I put an equal amount of cold water in the pot, then dumped it all out and
put enough cold water in the pot and insert to cover the eggs with two
inches cold water.

I pulled two eggs in 6 minutes and let them drain.

I drained the others in 12 minutes.

Results:
One of the new eggs cracked longitudinally, but the egg did not part and no
white came out of the shell.

I cracked a new egg - the white was not firm, but not runny - it was
partially cooked.

The old egg had the same result -not fully cooked.

I am now returning the remaining eggs to the steamer for an additional ten
minutes in steam and retesting.

Based on these results, I would guess that it will take about 18-20 minutes
steaming rather than 12 minutes for an extra large egg, when doing a dozen
eggs at once.

More at next test.




  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 26-03-2005, 07:01 PM
--
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Ok - putting the eggs back in for 8 more minutes steam and 8 minutes rest,
It's hard to say what the net cooking time was -
( my best guess is still 18 -20 minutes for the x-large eggs from a cold
refrigerator)

First thing of interest - the older eggs are now cooked almost to the
center - there was a spot about the size of a ten font small "o" in the
middle of the yoke of the older eggs that was not yet dry. Light yellow but
not dry.
The new eggs had a pin point in the center of some yolks, but not all,
that was not cooked to dry.

Second, the eggs smelled more "eggy" than when boiled in water.

Third, the yolks did not appear as green on the yolk-white interface as in
overcooked eggs, but it did seem to have a tiny hint of green shade compared
to my boil method. However, if you weren't looking for it, you would never
see it.
(remember that these eggs were twice-cooked)

Fourth - the cracked egg (cracked all the way down the side and in a "Y")
still did not have any white coming out AT ALL - the inside white is
visible.

As to peeling -
when peeled immediately after removal from the cold water:
I did not notice an appreciable difference from my old method. The
membrane seemed to cling to the egg and the shell almost-but-not equally.
However, since this was to be an experiment in peeling, I tried to peel
from the side and from the dimpled end. I cracked the shell all over, and
1) when I lifted the shell from the side - it was pick and pull to get
under the membrane, and was not much better than my boiling method.
2) when I opened the dimple end first so I could get under the membrane,
they peeled a lot easier than from the side, and all eggs so far have peeled
without white clinging to .
Note I did not knowingly try this end-first method with my boiled eggs. In
that method, sometimes the shells slide off and sometimes they don't.

I will let the rest of the eggs set and peel more later. Update in a few
hours.

NOTE: the results are not necessarily going to be the same for an 18 minute
non-stop steaming - remember that because of the initial failure to cook,
this was a "more-cook" situation.

"--" wrote in message
...
In lieu of my "bring to boil and remove from and let sit in the water 15
minutes method", which cooks perfectly but has occasional peeling

problems,
I tried the following and just finished the test:

8 fresh extra-large eggs (these hens were apparently fed only grain,
according to the carton)
4 quite old extra-large eggs (expiration date from last week -Mar 23)

self-defrost refrigerator is about 38 degrees, eggs in carton are stored

on
top shelf near the fan

850 feet above sea level

cold tap water

pasta cooker (enamel, deep, fits the large burner completely - has an

insert
that sits above the water for lifting pasta, an insert colander, and an
insert colander strainer-cover. I removed the colander equipment, using

only
the insert.)

about 2-3" water, to just below and not touching the insert where the eggs
rest.

the eggs went into the insert and into the pot, then I put the water in

the
pot and placed the covered pot on the stove, on high.

Just before water boiled, I turned the burner down to low (it kept the

water
at a low boil and the pot was full of water vapor).

I timed from when the water boiled (from visual check and by sound)

12 minutes steamed (the eggs were extra large, and I plan to devil them if
they cook fully, so I guessed an extra two minutes more than large eggs)

12 minutes resting

I put an equal amount of cold water in the pot, then dumped it all out and
put enough cold water in the pot and insert to cover the eggs with two
inches cold water.

I pulled two eggs in 6 minutes and let them drain.

I drained the others in 12 minutes.

Results:
One of the new eggs cracked longitudinally, but the egg did not part and

no
white came out of the shell.

I cracked a new egg - the white was not firm, but not runny - it was
partially cooked.

The old egg had the same result -not fully cooked.

I am now returning the remaining eggs to the steamer for an additional ten
minutes in steam and retesting.

Based on these results, I would guess that it will take about 18-20

minutes
steaming rather than 12 minutes for an extra large egg, when doing a dozen
eggs at once.

More at next test.





  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 26-03-2005, 07:39 PM
Cliff
 
Posts: n/a
Default

WOW! Sounds like you are having an emergency! Am sending over a bottle
of wine to calm you down. ; )

Cliff


"--" wrote in message
...
In lieu of my "bring to boil and remove from and let sit in the water 15
minutes method", which cooks perfectly but has occasional peeling
problems,
I tried the following and just finished the test:

8 fresh extra-large eggs (these hens were apparently fed only grain,
according to the carton)
4 quite old extra-large eggs (expiration date from last week -Mar 23)

self-defrost refrigerator is about 38 degrees, eggs in carton are stored
on
top shelf near the fan

850 feet above sea level

cold tap water

pasta cooker (enamel, deep, fits the large burner completely - has an
insert
that sits above the water for lifting pasta, an insert colander, and an
insert colander strainer-cover. I removed the colander equipment, using
only
the insert.)

about 2-3" water, to just below and not touching the insert where the
eggs
rest.

the eggs went into the insert and into the pot, then I put the water in
the
pot and placed the covered pot on the stove, on high.

Just before water boiled, I turned the burner down to low (it kept the
water
at a low boil and the pot was full of water vapor).

I timed from when the water boiled (from visual check and by sound)

12 minutes steamed (the eggs were extra large, and I plan to devil them
if
they cook fully, so I guessed an extra two minutes more than large eggs)

12 minutes resting

I put an equal amount of cold water in the pot, then dumped it all out
and
put enough cold water in the pot and insert to cover the eggs with two
inches cold water.

I pulled two eggs in 6 minutes and let them drain.

I drained the others in 12 minutes.

Results:
One of the new eggs cracked longitudinally, but the egg did not part
and no
white came out of the shell.

I cracked a new egg - the white was not firm, but not runny - it was
partially cooked.

The old egg had the same result -not fully cooked.

I am now returning the remaining eggs to the steamer for an additional
ten
minutes in steam and retesting.

Based on these results, I would guess that it will take about 18-20
minutes
steaming rather than 12 minutes for an extra large egg, when doing a
dozen
eggs at once.

More at next test.




  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 26-03-2005, 07:58 PM
--
 
Posts: n/a
Default

latest update - the next set of eggs peeled far easier after a half-hour out
of the water.

I have some more eggs, and I will try the peeling of the rest tomorrow

"--" wrote in message
...
Ok - putting the eggs back in for 8 more minutes steam and 8 minutes rest,
It's hard to say what the net cooking time was -
( my best guess is still 18 -20 minutes for the x-large eggs from a cold
refrigerator)

First thing of interest - the older eggs are now cooked almost to the
center - there was a spot about the size of a ten font small "o" in the
middle of the yoke of the older eggs that was not yet dry. Light yellow

but
not dry.
The new eggs had a pin point in the center of some yolks, but not all,
that was not cooked to dry.

Second, the eggs smelled more "eggy" than when boiled in water.

Third, the yolks did not appear as green on the yolk-white interface as

in
overcooked eggs, but it did seem to have a tiny hint of green shade

compared
to my boil method. However, if you weren't looking for it, you would never
see it.
(remember that these eggs were twice-cooked)

Fourth - the cracked egg (cracked all the way down the side and in a "Y")
still did not have any white coming out AT ALL - the inside white is
visible.

As to peeling -
when peeled immediately after removal from the cold water:
I did not notice an appreciable difference from my old method. The
membrane seemed to cling to the egg and the shell almost-but-not equally.
However, since this was to be an experiment in peeling, I tried to peel
from the side and from the dimpled end. I cracked the shell all over, and
1) when I lifted the shell from the side - it was pick and pull to get
under the membrane, and was not much better than my boiling method.
2) when I opened the dimple end first so I could get under the membrane,
they peeled a lot easier than from the side, and all eggs so far have

peeled
without white clinging to .
Note I did not knowingly try this end-first method with my boiled eggs.

In
that method, sometimes the shells slide off and sometimes they don't.

I will let the rest of the eggs set and peel more later. Update in a few
hours.

NOTE: the results are not necessarily going to be the same for an 18

minute
non-stop steaming - remember that because of the initial failure to cook,
this was a "more-cook" situation.

"--" wrote in message
...
In lieu of my "bring to boil and remove from and let sit in the water 15
minutes method", which cooks perfectly but has occasional peeling

problems,
I tried the following and just finished the test:

8 fresh extra-large eggs (these hens were apparently fed only grain,
according to the carton)
4 quite old extra-large eggs (expiration date from last week -Mar 23)

self-defrost refrigerator is about 38 degrees, eggs in carton are stored

on
top shelf near the fan

850 feet above sea level

cold tap water

pasta cooker (enamel, deep, fits the large burner completely - has an

insert
that sits above the water for lifting pasta, an insert colander, and an
insert colander strainer-cover. I removed the colander equipment, using

only
the insert.)

about 2-3" water, to just below and not touching the insert where the

eggs
rest.

the eggs went into the insert and into the pot, then I put the water in

the
pot and placed the covered pot on the stove, on high.

Just before water boiled, I turned the burner down to low (it kept the

water
at a low boil and the pot was full of water vapor).

I timed from when the water boiled (from visual check and by sound)

12 minutes steamed (the eggs were extra large, and I plan to devil them

if
they cook fully, so I guessed an extra two minutes more than large eggs)

12 minutes resting

I put an equal amount of cold water in the pot, then dumped it all out

and
put enough cold water in the pot and insert to cover the eggs with two
inches cold water.

I pulled two eggs in 6 minutes and let them drain.

I drained the others in 12 minutes.

Results:
One of the new eggs cracked longitudinally, but the egg did not part

and
no
white came out of the shell.

I cracked a new egg - the white was not firm, but not runny - it was
partially cooked.

The old egg had the same result -not fully cooked.

I am now returning the remaining eggs to the steamer for an additional

ten
minutes in steam and retesting.

Based on these results, I would guess that it will take about 18-20

minutes
steaming rather than 12 minutes for an extra large egg, when doing a

dozen
eggs at once.

More at next test.







  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 26-03-2005, 08:15 PM
--
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Cliff" wrote in message
news:[email protected]_s52...
WOW! Sounds like you are having an emergency! Am sending over a bottle
of wine to calm you down. ; )


Nah - things here are smooth and calm - one expects experiments not to work
as planned, more often than not.

Besides, I took up cooking because my blue-sky type projects on the big
skyscrapers took up to 8 years to find out if I was right (and meanwhile I
had to go on to the next one based on that last idea, not knowing if the
actual one would working or not.) Pretty much a given that that kind of
work takes a strong ego, and I needed something like adventurous cooking to
keep things in perspective.
With cooking design and experiments, it's a matter of hours before you
know if you were right or wrong. And wrong if done properly teaches as much,
if not more, than right.

And its only 99 cents worth of eggs, and everything else for tomorrow is
done. (Otherwise I would have been nuts to have done it.)

So anyway, the eggs are now cooked, much has been learned, info shared,
the eggs for the tray deviled plus two, and I have a focus on a method that
I think will work well next time.
And it was relaxing.

So it was time well spent.

PS - if it was too much info, let me know - I'll cut back on the theraputic
engineering-summary posts.





Cliff


"--" wrote in message
...
In lieu of my "bring to boil and remove from and let sit in the water 15
minutes method", which cooks perfectly but has occasional peeling
problems,
I tried the following and just finished the test:

8 fresh extra-large eggs (these hens were apparently fed only grain,
according to the carton)
4 quite old extra-large eggs (expiration date from last week -Mar 23)

self-defrost refrigerator is about 38 degrees, eggs in carton are stored
on
top shelf near the fan

850 feet above sea level

cold tap water

pasta cooker (enamel, deep, fits the large burner completely - has an
insert
that sits above the water for lifting pasta, an insert colander, and an
insert colander strainer-cover. I removed the colander equipment, using
only
the insert.)

about 2-3" water, to just below and not touching the insert where the
eggs
rest.

the eggs went into the insert and into the pot, then I put the water in
the
pot and placed the covered pot on the stove, on high.

Just before water boiled, I turned the burner down to low (it kept the
water
at a low boil and the pot was full of water vapor).

I timed from when the water boiled (from visual check and by sound)

12 minutes steamed (the eggs were extra large, and I plan to devil them
if
they cook fully, so I guessed an extra two minutes more than large eggs)

12 minutes resting

I put an equal amount of cold water in the pot, then dumped it all out
and
put enough cold water in the pot and insert to cover the eggs with two
inches cold water.

I pulled two eggs in 6 minutes and let them drain.

I drained the others in 12 minutes.

Results:
One of the new eggs cracked longitudinally, but the egg did not part
and no
white came out of the shell.

I cracked a new egg - the white was not firm, but not runny - it was
partially cooked.

The old egg had the same result -not fully cooked.

I am now returning the remaining eggs to the steamer for an additional
ten
minutes in steam and retesting.

Based on these results, I would guess that it will take about 18-20
minutes
steaming rather than 12 minutes for an extra large egg, when doing a
dozen
eggs at once.

More at next test.








  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 26-03-2005, 08:41 PM
Cliff
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Hey! Someone has to do it! I wish I had as much thought energy! lol
After all is said and done...it could be worth millions or at least a
visit with Oprah!
Ya never know.





  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 26-03-2005, 09:02 PM
Ophelia
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"--" wrote in message
...

"Cliff" wrote in message
news:[email protected]_s52...
WOW! Sounds like you are having an emergency! Am sending over a bottle
of wine to calm you down. ; )


Nah - things here are smooth and calm - one expects experiments not to
work
as planned, more often than not.

Besides, I took up cooking because my blue-sky type projects on the big
skyscrapers took up to 8 years to find out if I was right (and meanwhile I
had to go on to the next one based on that last idea, not knowing if the
actual one would working or not.) Pretty much a given that that kind of
work takes a strong ego, and I needed something like adventurous cooking
to
keep things in perspective.
With cooking design and experiments, it's a matter of hours before you
know if you were right or wrong. And wrong if done properly teaches as
much,
if not more, than right.

And its only 99 cents worth of eggs, and everything else for tomorrow is
done. (Otherwise I would have been nuts to have done it.)

So anyway, the eggs are now cooked, much has been learned, info shared,
the eggs for the tray deviled plus two, and I have a focus on a method
that
I think will work well next time.
And it was relaxing.

So it was time well spent.

PS - if it was too much info, let me know - I'll cut back on the
theraputic
engineering-summary posts.



Nope I appreciated it and I hope you will continue

Ophelia


  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 26-03-2005, 10:36 PM
Katra
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article ,
"--" wrote:

In lieu of my "bring to boil and remove from and let sit in the water 15
minutes method", which cooks perfectly but has occasional peeling problems,
I tried the following and just finished the test:

snipped
Based on these results, I would guess that it will take about 18-20 minutes
steaming rather than 12 minutes for an extra large egg, when doing a dozen
eggs at once.

More at next test.




I let it come to a rolling boil to steam...
I don't turn it down, I just turned it off after 10 minutes.

But, my eggs were medium to small.

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

,,Cat's Haven Hobby Farm,,Katraatcenturyteldotnet,,


http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...user id=katra
  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 26-03-2005, 11:19 PM
Janet Bostwick
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"--" wrote in message
...
latest update - the next set of eggs peeled far easier after a half-hour
out
of the water.

I have some more eggs, and I will try the peeling of the rest tomorrow


For reference, I used 8 large eggs. I brought the water to a full rolling
boil and never turned it down. I peeled the eggs when fully cold and peeled
them from the pointy end. I started cracking the eggs from the point and
cracked longitudinally. There was a space between the membrane and the
white of the egg and the shell came off in 2-3 pieces.
Janet


  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-03-2005, 02:36 AM
Monsur Fromage du Pollet
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Janet Bostwick" wrote in
:


"--" wrote in message
...
latest update - the next set of eggs peeled far easier after a
half-hour out
of the water.

I have some more eggs, and I will try the peeling of the rest
tomorrow


For reference, I used 8 large eggs. I brought the water to a full
rolling boil and never turned it down. I peeled the eggs when fully
cold and peeled them from the pointy end. I started cracking the
eggs from the point and cracked longitudinally. There was a space
between the membrane and the white of the egg and the shell came off
in 2-3 pieces. Janet




exactly. Works well.

--
No Bread Crumbs were hurt in the making of this Meal.
Type 2 Diabetic 1AC 7.3, 5.5, 5.6 mmol
Continuing to be Manitoban


  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-03-2005, 07:11 PM
--
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"--" wrote in message
...
latest update - the next set of eggs peeled far easier after a half-hour

out
of the water.

I have some more eggs, and I will try the peeling of the rest tomorrow

"--" wrote in message
...
Ok - putting the eggs back in for 8 more minutes steam and 8 minutes

rest,
It's hard to say what the net cooking time was -
( my best guess is still 18 -20 minutes for the x-large eggs from a cold
refrigerator)

First thing of interest - the older eggs are now cooked almost to the
center - there was a spot about the size of a ten font small "o" in the
middle of the yoke of the older eggs that was not yet dry. Light yellow

but
not dry.
The new eggs had a pin point in the center of some yolks, but not all,
that was not cooked to dry.

Second, the eggs smelled more "eggy" than when boiled in water.

Third, the yolks did not appear as green on the yolk-white interface

as
in
overcooked eggs, but it did seem to have a tiny hint of green shade

compared
to my boil method. However, if you weren't looking for it, you would

never
see it.
(remember that these eggs were twice-cooked)

Fourth - the cracked egg (cracked all the way down the side and in a

"Y")
still did not have any white coming out AT ALL - the inside white is
visible.

As to peeling -
when peeled immediately after removal from the cold water:
I did not notice an appreciable difference from my old method. The
membrane seemed to cling to the egg and the shell almost-but-not

equally.
However, since this was to be an experiment in peeling, I tried to

peel
from the side and from the dimpled end. I cracked the shell all over,

and
1) when I lifted the shell from the side - it was pick and pull to get
under the membrane, and was not much better than my boiling method.
2) when I opened the dimple end first so I could get under the

membrane,
they peeled a lot easier than from the side, and all eggs so far have

peeled
without white clinging to .
Note I did not knowingly try this end-first method with my boiled

eggs.
In
that method, sometimes the shells slide off and sometimes they don't.

I will let the rest of the eggs set and peel more later. Update in a

few
hours.

NOTE: the results are not necessarily going to be the same for an 18

minute
non-stop steaming - remember that because of the initial failure to

cook,
this was a "more-cook" situation.

"--" wrote in message
...
In lieu of my "bring to boil and remove from and let sit in the water

15
minutes method", which cooks perfectly but has occasional peeling

problems,
I tried the following and just finished the test:

8 fresh extra-large eggs (these hens were apparently fed only grain,
according to the carton)
4 quite old extra-large eggs (expiration date from last week -Mar 23)

self-defrost refrigerator is about 38 degrees, eggs in carton are

stored
on
top shelf near the fan

850 feet above sea level

cold tap water

pasta cooker (enamel, deep, fits the large burner completely - has an

insert
that sits above the water for lifting pasta, an insert colander, and

an
insert colander strainer-cover. I removed the colander equipment,

using
only
the insert.)

about 2-3" water, to just below and not touching the insert where the

eggs
rest.

the eggs went into the insert and into the pot, then I put the water

in
the
pot and placed the covered pot on the stove, on high.

Just before water boiled, I turned the burner down to low (it kept the

water
at a low boil and the pot was full of water vapor).

I timed from when the water boiled (from visual check and by sound)

12 minutes steamed (the eggs were extra large, and I plan to devil

them
if
they cook fully, so I guessed an extra two minutes more than large

eggs)

12 minutes resting

I put an equal amount of cold water in the pot, then dumped it all out

and
put enough cold water in the pot and insert to cover the eggs with two
inches cold water.

I pulled two eggs in 6 minutes and let them drain.

I drained the others in 12 minutes.

Results:
One of the new eggs cracked longitudinally, but the egg did not part

and
no
white came out of the shell.

I cracked a new egg - the white was not firm, but not runny - it was
partially cooked.

The old egg had the same result -not fully cooked.

I am now returning the remaining eggs to the steamer for an additional

ten
minutes in steam and retesting.

Based on these results, I would guess that it will take about 18-20

minutes
steaming rather than 12 minutes for an extra large egg, when doing a

dozen
eggs at once.

More at next test.









  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-03-2005, 07:51 PM
--
 
Posts: n/a
Default

24 hours after steaming the extra-large eggs, and storing them in the open
on the top shelf of a self-defrosting refrigerator, I peeled the last two
eggs.

To recap - steamed/rested old and "fresh" eggs were peeled: immediately
after removal from the cold water, ten minutes later, 12 hours later, and
24 hours later.

The "peeled 24 hours after" eggs, starting from the end opposite the pointy
end (the dimpled end):
peeling dry after cracking totally around left a little white on the
membrane in a couple spots -
peeling after cracking all around, part-peeling about a fourth of the
surface, and then wetting the cracked egg for a couple seconds under cold
running water, the shell came off quite easily (slipped off). (Noticeably
better than my boiling method.)

There was a barely detectable difference between the older and fresh
steamed eggs that were peeled yesterday, but not today.

Observations - from the steam=rest=chill peeling test

1) There was a barely detectable difference between old and new eggs using
the steam method, if any.

2) Based on my test with other posts on the NG, the time of steaming for
thorough cooking is not universal for all egg sizes, but rather depends on
the size of the egg - 10 minutes for small/medium to 18 minutes (almost
twice the time) for X-large - and undoubtedly depends on the initial
temperature of the egg.
(No definitive test was done using various initial temperatures. )

3) The eggs did not peel noticeably better steaming (vs. boiling)
immediately after the ten minute chill.
They peeled easier at all times after ten minutes after being removed
from the cold water.

4) the house had more egg smell steaming vs. boiling, even using the
outside vented blower when steaming.

Note for future use - The egg was easier to start peeling when I firmly
depressed the white to get under the membrane, vs. trying to pick the
membrane from the white.
The dimpled end of the steamed egg had the membrane already parted from
the white.
Other posters had their success peeling from the pointed end.

That's about all I remember today.

"--" wrote in message
...
latest update - the next set of eggs peeled far easier after a half-hour

out
of the water.

I have some more eggs, and I will try the peeling of the rest tomorrow

"--" wrote in message
...
Ok - putting the eggs back in for 8 more minutes steam and 8 minutes

rest,
It's hard to say what the net cooking time was -
( my best guess is still 18 -20 minutes for the x-large eggs from a cold
refrigerator)

First thing of interest - the older eggs are now cooked almost to the
center - there was a spot about the size of a ten font small "o" in the
middle of the yoke of the older eggs that was not yet dry. Light yellow

but
not dry.
The new eggs had a pin point in the center of some yolks, but not all,
that was not cooked to dry.

Second, the eggs smelled more "eggy" than when boiled in water.

Third, the yolks did not appear as green on the yolk-white interface

as
in
overcooked eggs, but it did seem to have a tiny hint of green shade

compared
to my boil method. However, if you weren't looking for it, you would

never
see it.
(remember that these eggs were twice-cooked)

Fourth - the cracked egg (cracked all the way down the side and in a

"Y")
still did not have any white coming out AT ALL - the inside white is
visible.

As to peeling -
when peeled immediately after removal from the cold water:
I did not notice an appreciable difference from my old method. The
membrane seemed to cling to the egg and the shell almost-but-not

equally.
However, since this was to be an experiment in peeling, I tried to

peel
from the side and from the dimpled end. I cracked the shell all over,

and
1) when I lifted the shell from the side - it was pick and pull to get
under the membrane, and was not much better than my boiling method.
2) when I opened the dimple end first so I could get under the

membrane,
they peeled a lot easier than from the side, and all eggs so far have

peeled
without white clinging to .
Note I did not knowingly try this end-first method with my boiled

eggs.
In
that method, sometimes the shells slide off and sometimes they don't.

I will let the rest of the eggs set and peel more later. Update in a

few
hours.

NOTE: the results are not necessarily going to be the same for an 18

minute
non-stop steaming - remember that because of the initial failure to

cook,
this was a "more-cook" situation.

"--" wrote in message
...
In lieu of my "bring to boil and remove from and let sit in the water

15
minutes method", which cooks perfectly but has occasional peeling

problems,
I tried the following and just finished the test:

8 fresh extra-large eggs (these hens were apparently fed only grain,
according to the carton)
4 quite old extra-large eggs (expiration date from last week -Mar 23)

self-defrost refrigerator is about 38 degrees, eggs in carton are

stored
on
top shelf near the fan

850 feet above sea level

cold tap water

pasta cooker (enamel, deep, fits the large burner completely - has an

insert
that sits above the water for lifting pasta, an insert colander, and

an
insert colander strainer-cover. I removed the colander equipment,

using
only
the insert.)

about 2-3" water, to just below and not touching the insert where the

eggs
rest.

the eggs went into the insert and into the pot, then I put the water

in
the
pot and placed the covered pot on the stove, on high.

Just before water boiled, I turned the burner down to low (it kept the

water
at a low boil and the pot was full of water vapor).

I timed from when the water boiled (from visual check and by sound)

12 minutes steamed (the eggs were extra large, and I plan to devil

them
if
they cook fully, so I guessed an extra two minutes more than large

eggs)

12 minutes resting

I put an equal amount of cold water in the pot, then dumped it all out

and
put enough cold water in the pot and insert to cover the eggs with two
inches cold water.

I pulled two eggs in 6 minutes and let them drain.

I drained the others in 12 minutes.

Results:
One of the new eggs cracked longitudinally, but the egg did not part

and
no
white came out of the shell.

I cracked a new egg - the white was not firm, but not runny - it was
partially cooked.

The old egg had the same result -not fully cooked.

I am now returning the remaining eggs to the steamer for an additional

ten
minutes in steam and retesting.

Based on these results, I would guess that it will take about 18-20

minutes
steaming rather than 12 minutes for an extra large egg, when doing a

dozen
eggs at once.

More at next test.









  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-03-2005, 05:58 PM
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Ophelia said :
Nope I appreciated it and I hope you will continue



I'll second that. And Cliff, my life is always an emergency, so send
the wine this way.g

Dean G.



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