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Old 13-03-2005, 04:58 PM
Damsel in dis Dress
 
Posts: n/a
Default Vanilla Pudding vs. Bavarian Cream

What's the difference?

Thanks!
Carol
--
"Years ago my mother used to say to me... She'd say,
'In this world Elwood, you must be oh-so smart or oh-so pleasant.'
Well, for years I was smart.... I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."

*James Stewart* in the 1950 movie, _Harvey_

  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 13-03-2005, 06:47 PM
Bob (this one)
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Damsel in dis Dress wrote:

What's the difference?
=20
Thanks!
Carol


Two recipes tell it all. First, vanilla pudding. Then Bavarian cream.

Pastorio
----------------------
<http://southernfood.about.com/od/puddingrecipes/r/bl30120k.htm
Vanilla Pudding From Diana Rattray,
Your Guide to Southern U.S. Cuisine.
FREE Newsletter. Sign Up Now!

A vanilla pudding recipe. Scroll down the page for more pudding=20
recipes, including a recipe for chocolate pudding.

INGREDIENTS:

* 3 cups milk
* 1/4 cup cornstarch
* 1/2 cup sugar
* 1/4 teaspoon salt
* 1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract

PREPARATION:
Scald 2 2/3 cups of the milk. Mix cornstarch, sugar and salt; stir in=20
remaining 1/3 cup milk. Add to scalded milk and cook over low heat,=20
stirring constantly, until thickened and smooth. Continue cooking=20
vanilla pudding for about 5 minutes to thoroughly cook cornstarch.=20
Cool vanilla pudding slightly; stir in vanilla and pour into serving=20
dishes. Vanilla pudding recipe serves 6.

------------------------
<http://www.foodreference.com/html/bavarian-cream-recipe1.html
See also: Bavarian Cream History & Facts
BAVARIAN CREAM (Bavarois =E0 la Cr=E8me)

from Larousse Gastronomique: The World's Greatest Cookery Encyclopedia=20
(1988 ed.)

Chill 3.5 dl (12 fl oz, 1 1/2 cups) double (heavy) cream and 75=20
ml (3 fl oz. 1/3 cup) milk in the refrigerator. Soak 15=9720 g (1/2 -=20
3/4 oz, 2-3 envelopes) gelatine in 3 tablespoons cold water. Boil 6 dl=20
(1 pint, 2 1/2 cups) milk and a vanilla pod (vanilla bean). Work 8 egg=20
yolks, 125 g (4 oz, 1/2 cup) caster (superfine) sugar, and a pinch of=20
salt together, and when the mixture is smooth, blend in the milk (from=20
which the vanilla pod (vanilla bean) has been removed). Then add the=20
gelatine and mix well. Stir continuously over a gentle heat until the=20
mixture coats the back of a spoon. It is important not to allow the=20
mixture to boil. Pour into a bowl and allow to cool, then refrigerate=20
until custard is cold and just beginning to thicken.
Whip together the chilled cream and cold milk. As soon as it=20
begins to thicken, add 50 g (2 oz, 4 tablespoons) caster (superfine)=20
sugar, then add to the cooled mixture. Brush the inside of a Bavarian=20
cream (or souffl=E9 or savarin) mold with oil, preferably almond oil.=20
Fill to the brim with the Bavarian cream mixture. Cover with buttered=20
paper and refrigerate until firmly set. To loosen the cream, dip the=20
bottom of the mold in hot water, place a serving dish on top of the=20
mold, and quickly turn them over together.
A Bavarian cream may alternatively be flavored with coffee (add=20
2 tablespoons instant coffee to the milk instead of the vanilla pod),=20
with chocolate (add 100 g (4 oz) melted cooking chocolate to the=20
milk), with lemon or orange (add the juice of 2 lemons or oranges),=20
with liqueur (add approximately 2 teaspoons), with praline, etc.

  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 13-03-2005, 07:07 PM
zxcvbob
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Bob (this one) wrote:
Damsel in dis Dress wrote:

What's the difference?

Thanks!
Carol



Two recipes tell it all. First, vanilla pudding. Then Bavarian cream.

Pastorio
----------------------
<http://southernfood.about.com/od/puddingrecipes/r/bl30120k.htm
Vanilla Pudding From Diana Rattray,
Your Guide to Southern U.S. Cuisine.
FREE Newsletter. Sign Up Now!

A vanilla pudding recipe. Scroll down the page for more pudding recipes,
including a recipe for chocolate pudding.

INGREDIENTS:

* 3 cups milk
* 1/4 cup cornstarch
* 1/2 cup sugar
* 1/4 teaspoon salt
* 1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract

PREPARATION:
Scald 2 2/3 cups of the milk. Mix cornstarch, sugar and salt; stir in
remaining 1/3 cup milk. Add to scalded milk and cook over low heat,
stirring constantly, until thickened and smooth. Continue cooking
vanilla pudding for about 5 minutes to thoroughly cook cornstarch. Cool
vanilla pudding slightly; stir in vanilla and pour into serving dishes.
Vanilla pudding recipe serves 6.

------------------------
<http://www.foodreference.com/html/bavarian-cream-recipe1.html
See also: Bavarian Cream History & Facts
BAVARIAN CREAM (Bavarois à la Crème)

from Larousse Gastronomique: The World's Greatest Cookery Encyclopedia
(1988 ed.)

Chill 3.5 dl (12 fl oz, 1 1/2 cups) double (heavy) cream and 75 ml
(3 fl oz. 1/3 cup) milk in the refrigerator. Soak 15—20 g (1/2 - 3/4 oz,
2-3 envelopes) gelatine in 3 tablespoons cold water. Boil 6 dl (1 pint,
2 1/2 cups) milk and a vanilla pod (vanilla bean). Work 8 egg yolks, 125
g (4 oz, 1/2 cup) caster (superfine) sugar, and a pinch of salt
together, and when the mixture is smooth, blend in the milk (from which
the vanilla pod (vanilla bean) has been removed). Then add the gelatine
and mix well. Stir continuously over a gentle heat until the mixture
coats the back of a spoon. It is important not to allow the mixture to
boil. Pour into a bowl and allow to cool, then refrigerate until custard
is cold and just beginning to thicken.
Whip together the chilled cream and cold milk. As soon as it begins
to thicken, add 50 g (2 oz, 4 tablespoons) caster (superfine) sugar,
then add to the cooled mixture. Brush the inside of a Bavarian cream (or
soufflé or savarin) mold with oil, preferably almond oil. Fill to the
brim with the Bavarian cream mixture. Cover with buttered paper and
refrigerate until firmly set. To loosen the cream, dip the bottom of the
mold in hot water, place a serving dish on top of the mold, and quickly
turn them over together.
A Bavarian cream may alternatively be flavored with coffee (add 2
tablespoons instant coffee to the milk instead of the vanilla pod), with
chocolate (add 100 g (4 oz) melted cooking chocolate to the milk), with
lemon or orange (add the juice of 2 lemons or oranges), with liqueur
(add approximately 2 teaspoons), with praline, etc.




I always thought Bavarian Cream was whipped cream folded into an equal
amount of egg custard. (not too far off, except for the gelatin)

Why does this recipe have double cream diluted with milk instead of just
using a pint of heavy whipping cream? And it specifies caster or
superfine sugar even though the sugar is added to the hot mixture. Is
the recipe just trying to be complicated?

Thanks for posting it, I just wonder what is going on.

Best regards,
Bob
  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 13-03-2005, 07:24 PM
Damsel in dis Dress
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Bob (this one) wrote:

Two recipes tell it all. First, vanilla pudding. Then Bavarian cream.


Wow! They're completely different! My only experience with Bavarian cream
has been the stuffing in bismarks. They're probably just using canned
vanilla pudding in those things. I'd like to try the real thing sometime.

Thanks for posting!
Carol
--
"Years ago my mother used to say to me... She'd say,
'In this world Elwood, you must be oh-so smart or oh-so pleasant.'
Well, for years I was smart.... I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."

*James Stewart* in the 1950 movie, _Harvey_


  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 13-03-2005, 11:16 PM
djs0302
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Damsel in dis Dress wrote:
What's the difference?

Thanks!
Carol
--
"Years ago my mother used to say to me... She'd say,
'In this world Elwood, you must be oh-so smart or oh-so pleasant.'
Well, for years I was smart.... I recommend pleasant. You may quote

me."

*James Stewart* in the 1950 movie, _Harvey_


Bavarian cream is basically a vanilla custard base lightened with
whipped cream with gelatin added to it as a stabalizer.

  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 13-03-2005, 11:27 PM
Damsel in dis Dress
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"djs0302" , if that's their real name, wrote:

Bavarian cream is basically a vanilla custard base lightened with
whipped cream with gelatin added to it as a stabalizer.


You guys are making me so hungry! LOL!

Carol
--
"Years ago my mother used to say to me... She'd say,
'In this world Elwood, you must be oh-so smart or oh-so pleasant.'
Well, for years I was smart.... I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."

*James Stewart* in the 1950 movie, _Harvey_
  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 14-03-2005, 12:35 PM
Bob (this one)
 
Posts: n/a
Default

zxcvbob wrote:

Bob (this one) wrote:
=20
Damsel in dis Dress wrote:

What's the difference?

Thanks!
Carol




Two recipes tell it all. First, vanilla pudding. Then Bavarian cream.

Pastorio
----------------------
<http://southernfood.about.com/od/puddingrecipes/r/bl30120k.htm
Vanilla Pudding From Diana Rattray,
Your Guide to Southern U.S. Cuisine.
FREE Newsletter. Sign Up Now!

A vanilla pudding recipe. Scroll down the page for more pudding=20
recipes, including a recipe for chocolate pudding.

INGREDIENTS:

* 3 cups milk
* 1/4 cup cornstarch
* 1/2 cup sugar
* 1/4 teaspoon salt
* 1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract

PREPARATION:
Scald 2 2/3 cups of the milk. Mix cornstarch, sugar and salt; stir in =


remaining 1/3 cup milk. Add to scalded milk and cook over low heat,=20
stirring constantly, until thickened and smooth. Continue cooking=20
vanilla pudding for about 5 minutes to thoroughly cook cornstarch.=20
Cool vanilla pudding slightly; stir in vanilla and pour into serving=20
dishes. Vanilla pudding recipe serves 6.

------------------------
<http://www.foodreference.com/html/bavarian-cream-recipe1.html
See also: Bavarian Cream History & Facts
BAVARIAN CREAM (Bavarois =E0 la Cr=E8me)

from Larousse Gastronomique: The World's Greatest Cookery Encyclopedia=

=20
(1988 ed.)

Chill 3.5 dl (12 fl oz, 1 1/2 cups) double (heavy) cream and 75=20
ml (3 fl oz. 1/3 cup) milk in the refrigerator. Soak 15=9720 g (1/2 - =


3/4 oz, 2-3 envelopes) gelatine in 3 tablespoons cold water. Boil 6 dl=

=20
(1 pint, 2 1/2 cups) milk and a vanilla pod (vanilla bean). Work 8 egg=

=20
yolks, 125 g (4 oz, 1/2 cup) caster (superfine) sugar, and a pinch of =


salt together, and when the mixture is smooth, blend in the milk (from=

=20
which the vanilla pod (vanilla bean) has been removed). Then add the=20
gelatine and mix well. Stir continuously over a gentle heat until the =


mixture coats the back of a spoon. It is important not to allow the=20
mixture to boil. Pour into a bowl and allow to cool, then refrigerate =


until custard is cold and just beginning to thicken.
Whip together the chilled cream and cold milk. As soon as it=20
begins to thicken, add 50 g (2 oz, 4 tablespoons) caster (superfine)=20
sugar, then add to the cooled mixture. Brush the inside of a Bavarian =


cream (or souffl=E9 or savarin) mold with oil, preferably almond oil. =


Fill to the brim with the Bavarian cream mixture. Cover with buttered =


paper and refrigerate until firmly set. To loosen the cream, dip the=20
bottom of the mold in hot water, place a serving dish on top of the=20
mold, and quickly turn them over together.
A Bavarian cream may alternatively be flavored with coffee (add 2=

=20
tablespoons instant coffee to the milk instead of the vanilla pod),=20
with chocolate (add 100 g (4 oz) melted cooking chocolate to the=20
milk), with lemon or orange (add the juice of 2 lemons or oranges),=20
with liqueur (add approximately 2 teaspoons), with praline, etc.



I always thought Bavarian Cream was whipped cream folded into an equal =


amount of egg custard. (not too far off, except for the gelatin)


The gelatin is what permits molding it. Otherwise, it would slump=20
rather than stand up.

Why does this recipe have double cream diluted with milk instead of jus=

t=20
using a pint of heavy whipping cream?


Probably to get a milkfat balance lower than cream and higher than=20
milk. But do remember it comes from Larousse...

And it specifies caster or
superfine sugar even though the sugar is added to the hot mixture.=20


They're calling for creaming the sugar with egg yolk before adding to=20
the hot mixture. The finer grain sugar will go into solution faster=20
and smoother. Having said that, I can't see any good reason for it=20
beyond velocity of prep.

Is=20
the recipe just trying to be complicated?


So many old recipes are needlessly complex. Most of them are based on=20
"It's how we've always done it." The processes don't keep up with the=20
technologies available. "Cover with buttered paper and refrigerate=20
until firmly set." Remember it comes from Larousse...

It wouldn't be too difficult to deconstruct and reassemble the recipe=20
to shorten the processes and streamline the steps.

Thanks for posting it, I just wonder what is going on.


Rookie intimidation...

Pastorio



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