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  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
dollarsandsense
 
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Default omlette room temperature danger!

I made an omelette sandwich which consisted of toast, butter, mustard,
bacon and scrambled egg and kept it at room temperature for about 20
minutes but I had another sandwich which I planned on eating later in
the day and somebody said it was too dangerous to eat.

I though that without salad dressing you could eat an omelette egg at
room temperature without any fear of deterioration because it was
cooked.

I searched the net but could find nothing. Anybody have any idea or
know of a web site that talks about the safety or dangers of eating
a fried/scrambled egg at room temperature after several hours? Thanks.
  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Sheldon
 
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Default

dollarsandsense says:
I searched the net but could find nothing. Anybody have any idea or
know of a web site that talks about the safety or dangers of eating
a fried/scrambled egg at room temperature after several hours?


Look he http://www.aeb.org

Sheldon

  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Pete Romfh
 
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Default

dollarsandsense wrote:
> I made an omelette sandwich which consisted of toast,
> butter, mustard, bacon and scrambled egg and kept it at
> room temperature for about 20 minutes but I had another
> sandwich which I planned on eating later in the day and
> somebody said it was too dangerous to eat.
>
> I though that without salad dressing you could eat an
> omelette egg at room temperature without any fear of
> deterioration because it was cooked.
>
> I searched the net but could find nothing. Anybody have
> any idea or know of a web site that talks about the
> safety or dangers of eating a fried/scrambled egg at room
> temperature after several hours? Thanks.


Keeping moist food at room temp for more than an hour is problematic. Eggs
(even cooked) are a pretty good growth media. You might get away with it
most of the time but why take the chance.

On the other hand, how many of us survived having egg salad sandwiches in
our school lunchbox.
Damn, it's lucky we're alive.

Besides the "egg"cellent website that Sheldon posted, there's some good food
safety info at
http://hgic.clemson.edu/factsheets/HGIC3544.htm

--
Pete Romfh, Telecom Geek & Amateur Gourmet.
promfh at hal dash pc dot org


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Edwin Pawlowski
 
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"dollarsandsense" > wrote in message
...
>I made an omelette sandwich which consisted of toast, butter, mustard,
> bacon and scrambled egg and kept it at room temperature for about 20
> minutes but I had another sandwich which I planned on eating later in
> the day and somebody said it was too dangerous to eat.
>




Stop listening to the fear mongers and eat it. Twenty minutes is not going
to cause any problems.


  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
kilikini
 
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Default

Edwin Pawlowski wrote:
> "dollarsandsense" > wrote in message
> ...
>> I made an omelette sandwich which consisted of toast, butter,
>> mustard, bacon and scrambled egg and kept it at room temperature for
>> about 20 minutes but I had another sandwich which I planned on
>> eating later in the day and somebody said it was too dangerous to
>> eat.
>>

>
>
>
> Stop listening to the fear mongers and eat it. Twenty minutes is not
> going to cause any problems.


Thank you. My husband takes left over food to work with him every morning.
He heats it up by the sun hitting the tupperware container that's sitting on
his dashboard and eats it for lunch. (He does construction - no
microwaves.) He has never been sick from food sitting out, lukewarm, for 5
hours. We're talking all kinds of food, from rare burgers to fish.

kili




  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
jmcquown
 
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:
> "dollarsandsense" > wrote in message
> ...
>> I made an omelette sandwich which consisted of toast, butter,
>> mustard, bacon and scrambled egg and kept it at room temperature for
>> about 20 minutes but I had another sandwich which I planned on
>> eating later in the day and somebody said it was too dangerous to
>> eat.
>>

> Stop listening to the fear mongers and eat it. Twenty minutes is not
> going to cause any problems.


Reminds me of a discussion with a former co-worker. She came from a family
of farmers. Her grandmother would start preparing lunch around 10:00 AM
(they ate breakfast at sunrise). Fried chicken, or a stew; biscuits,
cornbread, gravy, mashed potatoes, beans. She'd cover the table with a
cloth and just let the food sit there while she did other stuff. An hour or
so later the men would come in from the fields and eat lunch. None of them
ever died from it.

While this doesn't address the omelet question directly, biscuits and
cornbread are made with eggs. I've never had a fear of eating them after
they've sat on the counter for a day. 20 minutes is nothing. Just long
enough for the sandwich to cool, I'd say.

Jill


  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Bock
 
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Default

Thanks everyone so much for your responses. I am very careful with my
food but it just didn't make sense that a well-cooked scrambled
egg/omlette couldn't be safely eaten. You have confirmed that.
  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
JA
 
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From the USDA:
http://www.fsis.usda.gov/Fact_Sheets...fety/index.asp

"Don't keep eggs - including Easter eggs - out of the refrigerator more than
2 hours.
Serve cooked eggs and dishes containing eggs immediately after cooking, or
place in
shallow containers for quick cooling and refrigerate at once for later use.
Use within 3 to 4 days. "


"dollarsandsense" > wrote in message
...
>I made an omelette sandwich which consisted of toast, butter, mustard,
> bacon and scrambled egg and kept it at room temperature for about 20
> minutes but I had another sandwich which I planned on eating later in
> the day and somebody said it was too dangerous to eat.
>
> I though that without salad dressing you could eat an omelette egg at
> room temperature without any fear of deterioration because it was
> cooked.
>
> I searched the net but could find nothing. Anybody have any idea or
> know of a web site that talks about the safety or dangers of eating
> a fried/scrambled egg at room temperature after several hours? Thanks.



  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Peter Aitken
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"JA" > wrote in message
...
> From the USDA:
> http://www.fsis.usda.gov/Fact_Sheets...fety/index.asp
>
> "Don't keep eggs - including Easter eggs - out of the refrigerator more
> than 2 hours.
> Serve cooked eggs and dishes containing eggs immediately after cooking, or
> place in
> shallow containers for quick cooling and refrigerate at once for later
> use. Use within 3 to 4 days. "
>



What most people do not realize is that recommendations from government
agencies are extremely conservative. They are concerned - not without
justification - that people will not follow directions carefully. Safety
first is their approach. It started back during WW2, or shortly thereafter.
During the war there was a big push in the US for home canning to helkp the
war effort, and quite a few people croaked from botulism. The guidelines
that were created were overkill, meant to insure that even the
dimmest-witted person did not poison themselves. This trend continues to
this day. I mean, really, the idea that a hard boiled egg can stay in the
fridge safely for only 3-4 days is ludicrous.

If you follow the gov't recs you;ll be safe certainly, but you'll also waste
a lot of perfectly good food.


--
Peter Aitken

Remove the crap from my email address before using.


  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Denise~*
 
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JA wrote:
> From the USDA:
> http://www.fsis.usda.gov/Fact_Sheets...fety/index.asp
>
> "Don't keep eggs - including Easter eggs - out of the refrigerator more than
> 2 hours.


hehe, all those Easters where we kept the eggs in a basket on The table
ALL DAY after finding the eggs, and then making sandwiches out of them.
hehehe. I'm still living.


  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
BOB
 
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Default

Denise~* wrote:
> JA wrote:
>> From the USDA:
>> http://www.fsis.usda.gov/Fact_Sheets...fety/index.asp
>>
>> "Don't keep eggs - including Easter eggs - out of the
>> refrigerator more than 2 hours.

>
> hehe, all those Easters where we kept the eggs in a
> basket on The table ALL DAY after finding the eggs, and
> then making sandwiches out of them. hehehe. I'm still
> living.


All day? I remember it being a couple of days 'til they were all gone.
And they sure weren't refrigerated while they were hidden by that silly
rabbit were they?

BOB


  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
 
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jmcquown wrote:
> Edwin Pawlowski wrote:
> > "dollarsandsense" > wrote in

message
> > ...
> >> I made an omelette sandwich which consisted of toast, butter,
> >> mustard, bacon and scrambled egg and kept it at room temperature

for
> >> about 20 minutes but I had another sandwich which I planned on
> >> eating later in the day and somebody said it was too dangerous to
> >> eat.
> >>

> > Stop listening to the fear mongers and eat it. Twenty minutes is

not
> > going to cause any problems.

>
> Reminds me of a discussion with a former co-worker. She came from a

family
> of farmers. Her grandmother would start preparing lunch around 10:00

AM
> (they ate breakfast at sunrise). Fried chicken, or a stew; biscuits,
> cornbread, gravy, mashed potatoes, beans. She'd cover the table with

a
> cloth and just let the food sit there while she did other stuff. An

hour or
> so later the men would come in from the fields and eat lunch. None

of them
> ever died from it.
>
> While this doesn't address the omelet question directly, biscuits and
> cornbread are made with eggs. I've never had a fear of eating them

after
> they've sat on the counter for a day. 20 minutes is nothing. Just

long
> enough for the sandwich to cool, I'd say.
>
> Jill



A lot of it depends on what a person's system is used to (how many
antibodies, enzymes, or one of those scientific thingies, etc., have
been built up).

My in-laws used to fry chicken and leave it out on the counter all
night (after serving it for dinner) and then eat it for lunch and/or
dinner the next day. If I ate it, I would be sick as a dog; none of
their family ever got sick - they were used to it.

I wouldn't eat cooked eggs (which are different than eggs which are
baked in something like biscuits or cookies) which had been sitting out
any longer than an hour or so. But that's just me.

N.

  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
A.C.
 
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Peter Aitken wrote:


> I mean, really, the idea that a hard boiled egg can stay in the
> fridge safely for only 3-4 days is ludicrous.
>


hahaha. i agree completely. i always thought it odd that a raw egg will last
in the fridge for over a month but once you cook it, it goes bad in 3 or 4
days. i remember as a kid we didn't even refrigerate dyed easter eggs and it
would take us several days to eat them all. i'm sure they were dyed with
cancer causing dyes too :P the only people who get sick from eating things
left out for 2 hours are the freaks that wash their hands 40 times a day and
carry around hand sanitizing cream in their pockets. you might as well live
in a ****ing sterile bubble :P


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