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  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Puester
 
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Default Bay leaf



Am I the only one in the world who detests the flavor and
even odor of bay leaf in food? I don't mind it as a
decoration in a wreath, but the smell of it cooking makes
me queazy. This dates back to childhood when my grandmother
making pickles used to drive me out of the house because
I couldn't stand the smell of the bay in the pickling spices.

gloria p
  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
notbob
 
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Default

On 2004-12-13, Puester > wrote:

> decoration in a wreath, but the smell of it cooking makes
> me queazy....


perhaps a mutant gene, like the one that make so many folks interpret
cilanto as a soap taste.

nb
  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
notbob
 
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Default

On 2004-12-13, Puester > wrote:

> decoration in a wreath, but the smell of it cooking makes
> me queazy....


perhaps a mutant gene, like the one that make so many folks interpret
cilanto as a soap taste.

nb
  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
 
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Default


Puester wrote:
> Am I the only one in the world who detests the flavor and
> even odor of bay leaf in food? I don't mind it as a
> decoration in a wreath, but the smell of it cooking makes
> me queazy. This dates back to childhood when my grandmother
> making pickles used to drive me out of the house because
> I couldn't stand the smell of the bay in the pickling spices.
>
> gloria p


ME TOO! And if I leave it out of recipes, I see no difference. Down
with Bay Leaves!!! Mike

  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
 
Posts: n/a
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Puester wrote:
> Am I the only one in the world who detests the flavor and
> even odor of bay leaf in food? I don't mind it as a
> decoration in a wreath, but the smell of it cooking makes
> me queazy. This dates back to childhood when my grandmother
> making pickles used to drive me out of the house because
> I couldn't stand the smell of the bay in the pickling spices.
>
> gloria p


ME TOO! And if I leave it out of recipes, I see no difference. Down
with Bay Leaves!!! Mike



  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Steve Calvin
 
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Default

Puester wrote:
>
> Am I the only one in the world who detests the flavor and
> even odor of bay leaf in food? I don't mind it as a
> decoration in a wreath, but the smell of it cooking makes
> me queazy. This dates back to childhood when my grandmother
> making pickles used to drive me out of the house because
> I couldn't stand the smell of the bay in the pickling spices.
>
> gloria p


I don't mind a small amount but it can easily become overpowering.

--
Steve

Why is it that most nudists are people you don't want to see naked?
  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Steve Calvin
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Puester wrote:
>
> Am I the only one in the world who detests the flavor and
> even odor of bay leaf in food? I don't mind it as a
> decoration in a wreath, but the smell of it cooking makes
> me queazy. This dates back to childhood when my grandmother
> making pickles used to drive me out of the house because
> I couldn't stand the smell of the bay in the pickling spices.
>
> gloria p


I don't mind a small amount but it can easily become overpowering.

--
Steve

Why is it that most nudists are people you don't want to see naked?
  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
limey
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Puester" > wrote in message
...
>
>
> Am I the only one in the world who detests the flavor and
> even odor of bay leaf in food? I don't mind it as a
> decoration in a wreath, but the smell of it cooking makes
> me queazy. This dates back to childhood when my grandmother
> making pickles used to drive me out of the house because
> I couldn't stand the smell of the bay in the pickling spices.
>
> gloria p


I can certainly understand it. Although I don't mind bay leaves, I cannot
stand rosemary's flavor or aroma. I get queasy just walking past a rosemary
bush.


  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
limey
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Puester" > wrote in message
...
>
>
> Am I the only one in the world who detests the flavor and
> even odor of bay leaf in food? I don't mind it as a
> decoration in a wreath, but the smell of it cooking makes
> me queazy. This dates back to childhood when my grandmother
> making pickles used to drive me out of the house because
> I couldn't stand the smell of the bay in the pickling spices.
>
> gloria p


I can certainly understand it. Although I don't mind bay leaves, I cannot
stand rosemary's flavor or aroma. I get queasy just walking past a rosemary
bush.


  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
pennyaline
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"notbob" wrote:
> perhaps a mutant gene, like the one that make so many folks interpret
> cilanto as a soap taste.



I detest cilantro! You are quite right. To me it tastes horrible, and for
the longest time I couldn't understand why anyone would want THAT crud in
their food.

There are genetic variations (not mutations, per se) that effect the senses
and cause some things to taste yummy for some and foul to others. It's
normal, and keeps life interesting.




  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
pennyaline
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"notbob" wrote:
> perhaps a mutant gene, like the one that make so many folks interpret
> cilanto as a soap taste.



I detest cilantro! You are quite right. To me it tastes horrible, and for
the longest time I couldn't understand why anyone would want THAT crud in
their food.

There are genetic variations (not mutations, per se) that effect the senses
and cause some things to taste yummy for some and foul to others. It's
normal, and keeps life interesting.


  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
Damsel in dis Dress
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Mon, 13 Dec 2004 16:41:54 GMT, Puester > wrote:

>Am I the only one in the world who detests the flavor and
>even odor of bay leaf in food? I don't mind it as a
>decoration in a wreath, but the smell of it cooking makes
>me queazy. This dates back to childhood when my grandmother
>making pickles used to drive me out of the house because
>I couldn't stand the smell of the bay in the pickling spices.


Gives me a warm, cozy feeling. Then again, I like cilantro, too.

Carol
--
"Years ago my mother used to say to me... She'd say,
'In this world Elwood, you must be oh-so smart or oh-so pleasant.'
Well, for years I was smart.... I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."

*James Stewart* in the 1950 movie, _Harvey_
  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
Damsel in dis Dress
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Mon, 13 Dec 2004 16:41:54 GMT, Puester > wrote:

>Am I the only one in the world who detests the flavor and
>even odor of bay leaf in food? I don't mind it as a
>decoration in a wreath, but the smell of it cooking makes
>me queazy. This dates back to childhood when my grandmother
>making pickles used to drive me out of the house because
>I couldn't stand the smell of the bay in the pickling spices.


Gives me a warm, cozy feeling. Then again, I like cilantro, too.

Carol
--
"Years ago my mother used to say to me... She'd say,
'In this world Elwood, you must be oh-so smart or oh-so pleasant.'
Well, for years I was smart.... I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."

*James Stewart* in the 1950 movie, _Harvey_
  #14 (permalink)   Report Post  
Nancy Young
 
Posts: n/a
Default

pennyaline wrote:
> There are genetic variations (not mutations, per se) that effect the senses
> and cause some things to taste yummy for some and foul to others. It's
> normal, and keeps life interesting.


(laugh) I was once called weird for saying cilantro tasted like
soap. What can I say.

nancy
  #15 (permalink)   Report Post  
Dave Smith
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Nancy Young wrote:

>
>
> (laugh) I was once called weird for saying cilantro tasted like
> soap. What can I say.


I think it tastes like copper.




  #16 (permalink)   Report Post  
Dave Smith
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Nancy Young wrote:

>
>
> (laugh) I was once called weird for saying cilantro tasted like
> soap. What can I say.


I think it tastes like copper.


  #17 (permalink)   Report Post  
Peter Aitken
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"pennyaline" > wrote in
message ...
> "notbob" wrote:
> > perhaps a mutant gene, like the one that make so many folks interpret
> > cilanto as a soap taste.

>
>
> I detest cilantro! You are quite right. To me it tastes horrible, and for
> the longest time I couldn't understand why anyone would want THAT crud in
> their food.
>
> There are genetic variations (not mutations, per se) that effect the

senses
> and cause some things to taste yummy for some and foul to others. It's
> normal, and keeps life interesting.
>
>


I don't think having a genetic makeup that makes certain foods taste foul is
particularly interesting!


--
Peter Aitken

Remove the crap from my email address before using.


  #18 (permalink)   Report Post  
Michael Odom
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Mon, 13 Dec 2004 16:41:54 GMT, Puester >
wrote:

>
>
>Am I the only one in the world who detests the flavor and
>even odor of bay leaf in food? I don't mind it as a
>decoration in a wreath, but the smell of it cooking makes
>me queazy. This dates back to childhood when my grandmother
>making pickles used to drive me out of the house because
>I couldn't stand the smell of the bay in the pickling spices.
>
>gloria p


Have you have experience with the milder Central American bay variety?
There's a Salvadoran place in Dallas that serves a fine sopa de
mariscos seasoned with bay and coconut milk. I loved it.


modom

"Dallas is a rich man with a death wish in his eyes."
-- Jimmie Dale Gilmore
  #19 (permalink)   Report Post  
Richard Periut
 
Posts: n/a
Default

pennyaline wrote:
> "notbob" wrote:
>
>>perhaps a mutant gene, like the one that make so many folks interpret
>>cilanto as a soap taste.

>
>
>
> I detest cilantro! You are quite right. To me it tastes horrible, and for
> the longest time I couldn't understand why anyone would want THAT crud in
> their food.
>
> There are genetic variations (not mutations, per se) that effect the senses
> and cause some things to taste yummy for some and foul to others. It's
> normal, and keeps life interesting.
>
>

Cilantro imparts a fresh herbal flavor to foods. I love it when it's
married with the appropriate cuisine.

Richard

--
"Dum Spiro, Spero."

As long as I breath, I hope.

Cicero (Ancient Rome)





`,,`,,`,,`,, `,,`
><((((>`..`..`.. ><((((> `. , .`.. ><((((>


Let there be fish!!!

  #20 (permalink)   Report Post  
Richard Periut
 
Posts: n/a
Default

pennyaline wrote:
> "notbob" wrote:
>
>>perhaps a mutant gene, like the one that make so many folks interpret
>>cilanto as a soap taste.

>
>
>
> I detest cilantro! You are quite right. To me it tastes horrible, and for
> the longest time I couldn't understand why anyone would want THAT crud in
> their food.
>
> There are genetic variations (not mutations, per se) that effect the senses
> and cause some things to taste yummy for some and foul to others. It's
> normal, and keeps life interesting.
>
>

Cilantro imparts a fresh herbal flavor to foods. I love it when it's
married with the appropriate cuisine.

Richard

--
"Dum Spiro, Spero."

As long as I breath, I hope.

Cicero (Ancient Rome)





`,,`,,`,,`,, `,,`
><((((>`..`..`.. ><((((> `. , .`.. ><((((>


Let there be fish!!!



  #21 (permalink)   Report Post  
Michael Odom
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Mon, 13 Dec 2004 16:31:56 -0500, Dave Smith
> wrote:

>Nancy Young wrote:
>
>>
>>
>> (laugh) I was once called weird for saying cilantro tasted like
>> soap. What can I say.

>
>I think it tastes like copper.
>

I think it offers proof not only that God exists, but that She loves
us as well.


modom

"Dallas is a rich man with a death wish in his eyes."
-- Jimmie Dale Gilmore
  #22 (permalink)   Report Post  
Michael Odom
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Mon, 13 Dec 2004 16:31:56 -0500, Dave Smith
> wrote:

>Nancy Young wrote:
>
>>
>>
>> (laugh) I was once called weird for saying cilantro tasted like
>> soap. What can I say.

>
>I think it tastes like copper.
>

I think it offers proof not only that God exists, but that She loves
us as well.


modom

"Dallas is a rich man with a death wish in his eyes."
-- Jimmie Dale Gilmore
  #23 (permalink)   Report Post  
Richard Periut
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Peter Aitken wrote:

> "pennyaline" > wrote in
> message ...
>
>>"notbob" wrote:
>>
>>>perhaps a mutant gene, like the one that make so many folks interpret
>>>cilanto as a soap taste.

>>
>>
>>I detest cilantro! You are quite right. To me it tastes horrible, and for
>>the longest time I couldn't understand why anyone would want THAT crud in
>>their food.
>>
>>There are genetic variations (not mutations, per se) that effect the

>
> senses
>
>>and cause some things to taste yummy for some and foul to others. It's
>>normal, and keeps life interesting.
>>
>>

>
>
> I don't think having a genetic makeup that makes certain foods taste foul is
> particularly interesting!
>
>

Funny, my wife can't stand the odor of cooked lamb. Matter of fact, once
I was making a leg of lamb, and she started retching so hard, she
collapsed on the floor (neurocardiogenic syncope,) and me and my
brother-in-law had to slap her on the face with some cold water.

Let alone old mutton; that would definitely kill her.

Richard

--
"Dum Spiro, Spero."

As long as I breath, I hope.

Cicero (Ancient Rome)





`,,`,,`,,`,, `,,`
><((((>`..`..`.. ><((((> `. , .`.. ><((((>


Let there be fish!!!

  #24 (permalink)   Report Post  
Richard Periut
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Peter Aitken wrote:

> "pennyaline" > wrote in
> message ...
>
>>"notbob" wrote:
>>
>>>perhaps a mutant gene, like the one that make so many folks interpret
>>>cilanto as a soap taste.

>>
>>
>>I detest cilantro! You are quite right. To me it tastes horrible, and for
>>the longest time I couldn't understand why anyone would want THAT crud in
>>their food.
>>
>>There are genetic variations (not mutations, per se) that effect the

>
> senses
>
>>and cause some things to taste yummy for some and foul to others. It's
>>normal, and keeps life interesting.
>>
>>

>
>
> I don't think having a genetic makeup that makes certain foods taste foul is
> particularly interesting!
>
>

Funny, my wife can't stand the odor of cooked lamb. Matter of fact, once
I was making a leg of lamb, and she started retching so hard, she
collapsed on the floor (neurocardiogenic syncope,) and me and my
brother-in-law had to slap her on the face with some cold water.

Let alone old mutton; that would definitely kill her.

Richard

--
"Dum Spiro, Spero."

As long as I breath, I hope.

Cicero (Ancient Rome)





`,,`,,`,,`,, `,,`
><((((>`..`..`.. ><((((> `. , .`.. ><((((>


Let there be fish!!!

  #25 (permalink)   Report Post  
pennyaline
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Richard Periut" wrote:
> Cilantro imparts a fresh herbal flavor to foods. I love it when it's
> married with the appropriate cuisine.


I appreciate what you're saying, but I and many others, alas, will never
experience that.




  #26 (permalink)   Report Post  
pennyaline
 
Posts: n/a
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"Peter Aitken" wrote:
> I don't think having a genetic makeup that makes certain foods taste foul

is
> particularly interesting!


It works both ways, remember? Expand your perspective.


  #27 (permalink)   Report Post  
pennyaline
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Peter Aitken" wrote:
> I don't think having a genetic makeup that makes certain foods taste foul

is
> particularly interesting!


It works both ways, remember? Expand your perspective.


  #28 (permalink)   Report Post  
Puester
 
Posts: n/a
Default

pennyaline wrote:
>
> "Richard Periut" wrote:
> > Cilantro imparts a fresh herbal flavor to foods. I love it when it's
> > married with the appropriate cuisine.

>
> I appreciate what you're saying, but I and many others, alas, will never
> experience that.




A few years ago I would have said the same thing, but
I have begun to like it. I'm not sure what combination
made it begin to taste unlike soap, but something did
now I like it in various dishes.

gloria p
  #29 (permalink)   Report Post  
Puester
 
Posts: n/a
Default

pennyaline wrote:
>
> "Richard Periut" wrote:
> > Cilantro imparts a fresh herbal flavor to foods. I love it when it's
> > married with the appropriate cuisine.

>
> I appreciate what you're saying, but I and many others, alas, will never
> experience that.




A few years ago I would have said the same thing, but
I have begun to like it. I'm not sure what combination
made it begin to taste unlike soap, but something did
now I like it in various dishes.

gloria p
  #32 (permalink)   Report Post  
Nancy Young
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Peter Aitken wrote:
>
> "pennyaline" > wrote
> > There are genetic variations (not mutations, per se) that effect the

> senses
> > and cause some things to taste yummy for some and foul to others. It's
> > normal, and keeps life interesting.


> I don't think having a genetic makeup that makes certain foods taste foul is
> particularly interesting!


I think it is very interesting. Why should some foods attract
people and others repel them. I'm just curious that way.

nancy (cilantro still tastess like soap to me)
  #33 (permalink)   Report Post  
Nancy Young
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Peter Aitken wrote:
>
> "pennyaline" > wrote
> > There are genetic variations (not mutations, per se) that effect the

> senses
> > and cause some things to taste yummy for some and foul to others. It's
> > normal, and keeps life interesting.


> I don't think having a genetic makeup that makes certain foods taste foul is
> particularly interesting!


I think it is very interesting. Why should some foods attract
people and others repel them. I'm just curious that way.

nancy (cilantro still tastess like soap to me)
  #34 (permalink)   Report Post  
Steve Calvin
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Nancy Young wrote:

> Peter Aitken wrote:
>
>>"pennyaline" > wrote
>>
>>>There are genetic variations (not mutations, per se) that effect the

>>
>>senses
>>
>>>and cause some things to taste yummy for some and foul to others. It's
>>>normal, and keeps life interesting.

>
>
>>I don't think having a genetic makeup that makes certain foods taste foul is
>>particularly interesting!

>
>
> I think it is very interesting. Why should some foods attract
> people and others repel them. I'm just curious that way.
>
> nancy (cilantro still tastess like soap to me)


I'm with you nancy. I can't handle cilantro but parsley's fine.
Cilantro=soap, at least to me.

--
Steve

Why is it that most nudists are people you don't want to see naked?
  #35 (permalink)   Report Post  
Steve Calvin
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Nancy Young wrote:

> Peter Aitken wrote:
>
>>"pennyaline" > wrote
>>
>>>There are genetic variations (not mutations, per se) that effect the

>>
>>senses
>>
>>>and cause some things to taste yummy for some and foul to others. It's
>>>normal, and keeps life interesting.

>
>
>>I don't think having a genetic makeup that makes certain foods taste foul is
>>particularly interesting!

>
>
> I think it is very interesting. Why should some foods attract
> people and others repel them. I'm just curious that way.
>
> nancy (cilantro still tastess like soap to me)


I'm with you nancy. I can't handle cilantro but parsley's fine.
Cilantro=soap, at least to me.

--
Steve

Why is it that most nudists are people you don't want to see naked?


  #36 (permalink)   Report Post  
Ken Davey
 
Posts: n/a
Default

pennyaline wrote:
> "Richard Periut" wrote:
>> Cilantro imparts a fresh herbal flavor to foods. I love it when it's
>> married with the appropriate cuisine.

>
> I appreciate what you're saying, but I and many others, alas, will
> never experience that.


Cilantro (among other flavours) is an acquired taste.
This herb is central to Latin American cooking.
The first time I was confronted with it I did not like it.
Now I feel something is missing if it is not included as a finishing flavour
in many dishes. Give it a chance - it won't make you ill and in fact adds
nutrition and aids digestion.
I have gone from hating it to actually plucking it from the wild and chewing
it. It is subtle, it is bold, it is all of these.
Regards.
Ken.
--
http://www.rupert.net/~solar
Return address supplied by 'spammotel'
http://www.spammotel.com


  #37 (permalink)   Report Post  
Ken Davey
 
Posts: n/a
Default

pennyaline wrote:
> "Richard Periut" wrote:
>> Cilantro imparts a fresh herbal flavor to foods. I love it when it's
>> married with the appropriate cuisine.

>
> I appreciate what you're saying, but I and many others, alas, will
> never experience that.


Cilantro (among other flavours) is an acquired taste.
This herb is central to Latin American cooking.
The first time I was confronted with it I did not like it.
Now I feel something is missing if it is not included as a finishing flavour
in many dishes. Give it a chance - it won't make you ill and in fact adds
nutrition and aids digestion.
I have gone from hating it to actually plucking it from the wild and chewing
it. It is subtle, it is bold, it is all of these.
Regards.
Ken.
--
http://www.rupert.net/~solar
Return address supplied by 'spammotel'
http://www.spammotel.com


  #38 (permalink)   Report Post  
Damsel in dis Dress
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Tue, 14 Dec 2004 02:18:07 GMT, Puester > wrote:

>A few years ago I would have said the same thing, but
>I have begun to like it. I'm not sure what combination
>made it begin to taste unlike soap, but something did
>now I like it in various dishes.


The first time I bought cilantro, I noticed a smell like insecticide in the
car, all the way home. When I brought my produce in (I'd been at a
farmer's market), I figured out that the smell was the cilantro. Stupid
me, I ran it down the garbage disposal instead of throwing it in the trash
barrel. BOY, did it smell like we'd just been fumigated!

But now I like it, and sometimes actually crave it.

Go figure,
Carol
--
"Years ago my mother used to say to me... She'd say,
'In this world Elwood, you must be oh-so smart or oh-so pleasant.'
Well, for years I was smart.... I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."

*James Stewart* in the 1950 movie, _Harvey_
  #39 (permalink)   Report Post  
Damsel in dis Dress
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Tue, 14 Dec 2004 02:18:07 GMT, Puester > wrote:

>A few years ago I would have said the same thing, but
>I have begun to like it. I'm not sure what combination
>made it begin to taste unlike soap, but something did
>now I like it in various dishes.


The first time I bought cilantro, I noticed a smell like insecticide in the
car, all the way home. When I brought my produce in (I'd been at a
farmer's market), I figured out that the smell was the cilantro. Stupid
me, I ran it down the garbage disposal instead of throwing it in the trash
barrel. BOY, did it smell like we'd just been fumigated!

But now I like it, and sometimes actually crave it.

Go figure,
Carol
--
"Years ago my mother used to say to me... She'd say,
'In this world Elwood, you must be oh-so smart or oh-so pleasant.'
Well, for years I was smart.... I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."

*James Stewart* in the 1950 movie, _Harvey_
  #40 (permalink)   Report Post  
Damsel in dis Dress
 
Posts: n/a
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On Mon, 13 Dec 2004 23:16:56 GMT, Richard Periut > wrote:

>Funny, my wife can't stand the odor of cooked lamb. Matter of fact, once
>I was making a leg of lamb, and she started retching so hard, she
>collapsed on the floor (neurocardiogenic syncope,) and me and my
>brother-in-law had to slap her on the face with some cold water.
>
>Let alone old mutton; that would definitely kill her.


Please tell her I feel bad for her.
Are you going to restrict your lamb-cooking to the grill outdoors now?

Carol
--
"Years ago my mother used to say to me... She'd say,
'In this world Elwood, you must be oh-so smart or oh-so pleasant.'
Well, for years I was smart.... I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."

*James Stewart* in the 1950 movie, _Harvey_
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