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Old 12-02-2019, 04:37 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default snow big deal

On 2019-02-12 11:07 a.m., U.S. Janet B. wrote:
On Tue, 12 Feb 2019 04:03:16 -0800, "Julie Bove"
wrote:


snip

Our snow here is different. East Coast snow is dryer. West Coast snow is
heavy and wet. Forms a thick layer of ice almost instantly. And they use
salt/sand or chemicals on the East Coast.


Not true, every place gets all different kinds of snow


It has nothing to do with east or west. It is the weather conditions are
the time. Snow that falls when it is close to the freezing point tends
to be wetter and heavier. Snow that falls when it is dry and cold tends
to be light and fluffy, but that same snow can be dense and heavy if it
falls during high winds that break up the crystals. That was what
happened here in the Blizzard of 77. There was not that much snow but it
was extremely cold and Lake Erie was frozen over. Snow was blown all the
way across the lake and the flat areas of south western Ontario. Then it
piled up into huge, solid drifts here.





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Old 12-02-2019, 05:03 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default snow big deal

Julie Bove wrote:

"Ed Pawlowski" wrote in message
...
On 2/11/2019 1:34 PM, tert in seattle wrote:
People panicked here in the Seattle area last Thursday, as evidenced
by my local Fred Meyer being completely out of shopping carts when I
arrived around 6pm to pick up a few things. I had done my major shopping
the day before and as always I managed to forget something. I soon found
where all the shopping carts had gone - they were manned by restive
customers standing in lines 20 deep, going halfway up the aisles. I
must say things were pretty calm despite the gridlock and lack of
essentials like bread and bananas. Fortunately I had "about 12 items"
and the express lane lines were more reasonable.


When I lived in Philadelphia, that was common. In New England, no big
deal. People were batter at driving in snow and the highway crews are
better equipped to deal with it. In all my years in CT, if I could get
out my driveway I could get to the store.


Our snow here is different. East Coast snow is dryer. West Coast snow is
heavy and wet. Forms a thick layer of ice almost instantly. And they use
salt/sand or chemicals on the East Coast.



That explains why we were in the Midwest, half way in between east and
west, get both. Or not.

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Old 12-02-2019, 05:10 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default snow big deal

On Tuesday, February 12, 2019 at 10:07:37 AM UTC-6, U.S. Janet B. wrote:
On Tue, 12 Feb 2019 04:03:16 -0800, "Julie Bove"
wrote:


snip

Our snow here is different. East Coast snow is dryer. West Coast snow is
heavy and wet. Forms a thick layer of ice almost instantly. And they use
salt/sand or chemicals on the East Coast.


Not true, every place gets all different kinds of snow


Very true! I've heard it said that there are like 50 words for snow in North Polar Humans' languages. And there are in English, just not as many.

John Kuthe...
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Old 12-02-2019, 05:11 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default snow big deal

On Tuesday, February 12, 2019 at 11:03:54 AM UTC-6, Jinx the Minx wrote:
Julie Bove wrote:

"Ed Pawlowski" wrote in message
...
On 2/11/2019 1:34 PM, tert in seattle wrote:
People panicked here in the Seattle area last Thursday, as evidenced
by my local Fred Meyer being completely out of shopping carts when I
arrived around 6pm to pick up a few things. I had done my major shopping
the day before and as always I managed to forget something. I soon found
where all the shopping carts had gone - they were manned by restive
customers standing in lines 20 deep, going halfway up the aisles. I
must say things were pretty calm despite the gridlock and lack of
essentials like bread and bananas. Fortunately I had "about 12 items"
and the express lane lines were more reasonable.

When I lived in Philadelphia, that was common. In New England, no big
deal. People were batter at driving in snow and the highway crews are
better equipped to deal with it. In all my years in CT, if I could get
out my driveway I could get to the store.


Our snow here is different. East Coast snow is dryer. West Coast snow is
heavy and wet. Forms a thick layer of ice almost instantly. And they use
salt/sand or chemicals on the East Coast.



That explains why we were in the Midwest, half way in between east and
west, get both. Or not.


ROFL! Yeah, we get the worst of BOTH COASTS! ;-)

John Kuthe, STL MO...
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Old 12-02-2019, 06:16 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default snow big deal

writes:

"Ed Pawlowski" wrote in message
...


When I lived in Philadelphia, that was common. In New England, no big
deal. People were batter at driving in snow and the highway crews are
better equipped to deal with it. In all my years in CT, if I could get
out my driveway I could get to the store.


Our snow here is different. East Coast snow is dryer. West Coast snow is
heavy and wet. Forms a thick layer of ice almost instantly. And they use
salt/sand or chemicals on the East Coast.


Yesterday I saw huge flakes, lake effect type snow, in the afternoon.

https://photos.app.goo.gl/SL3gi2SUcaGrgvw37

Toward evening it grew wetter and the flakes got smaller until it became
rain. The type of snow depends on the temperature of the air and how it
mixes up. Looking forward to good old rain. My jury duty was cancelled
and I don't need to go back - I am considered having served. Whew!

They got four feet in Snoqualmie Pass in 36 hours - if you could get
there the skiing would be a dream! But I-90 is closed at least until
tomorrow. My boss is stuck on the other side. :-/




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Old 12-02-2019, 06:19 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default snow big deal

On Tue, 12 Feb 2019 03:05:49 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
wrote:

On Monday, February 11, 2019 at 4:33:35 PM UTC-5, Bruce wrote:
On Mon, 11 Feb 2019 16:32:12 -0500, Dave Smith
wrote:

On 2019-02-11 3:00 p.m., Ed Pawlowski wrote:

When I lived in Philadelphia, that was common.* In New England, no big
deal.* People were batter at driving in snow and the highway crews are
better equipped to deal with it.* In all my years in CT, if I could get
out my driveway I could get to the store.

We always get a chuckle over the traffic chaos that results from very
small amounts of snow in the lower half of the US. It seems that is
takes only about a half inch of snow to bring the transportation
infrastructure to its knees.


Wait until you get a tiny hurricane.


We call 'em tornadoes

This far inland, hurricanes arrive pretty well spent. A few days of
rain or gloomy weather is about as far as it goes.


We call them cyclones. We only get the tail end, which mainly means
rain. But it can lead to severe flooding.
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Old 12-02-2019, 06:45 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default snow big deal

tert in seattle wrote:

here you go - how different regions react to the snow:

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/Dy5l-xmVsAA36SA.jpg


That's very funny. Your Seattle column is exactly like
a Virginia Beach column.

Also (the really funny part that cracked me up)
Was the end row about large snow and one thing
said, "Jim Cantore spotted" or something like that.

Cracked me up as it's based on reality. Cantore is top dog on the
Weather Channel and he always tries to situate himself at "ground
zero" during any big storm. lol
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Old 12-02-2019, 08:01 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default snow big deal

On 2019-02-12 2:02 p.m., wrote:
On Tue, 12 Feb 2019 11:31:48 -0500, Dave Smith
wrote:

On 2019-02-12 7:04 a.m.,
wrote:
On Mon, 11 Feb 2019 20:01:44 -0800 (PST), "


We've got a fleet of snow plows as well as mountains of salt ready to be used.
However, we don't use sand.

Outside the city we use sand only - people have wells and salt
draining from the road is deadly.



Really? Nova Scotia has modified its approach to winter road
maintenance by using more efficient methods of salting, but it still
uses a lot of salt on its roads. For a number of years they have been
applying it proactively, applying a salt solution to the roads before
the snow starts.

Well salt pollution is not much of an issue in rural areas. There is
relatively little salt used per unit area compared to urban areas where
there are many more roads and higher standards. My well is only about 60
feet from the road and I have no salt issues.


Yes, really. In town and also on the highways they are using the
pre-brining solution, very successfully, but wells don't abut
highways.

Okay, they are using brine instead of salt. The brine is salt. They are
still using salt, but less of it.


It would also depend on whether your well is a dug or drilled well,
still many dug wells operating happily in NS.


My well is dug. It probably picks up more salt from me salting my
sidewalk than it does from the road.




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Old 13-02-2019, 12:17 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default snow big deal

On Tuesday, February 12, 2019 at 10:07:37 AM UTC-6, U.S. Janet B. wrote:

On Tue, 12 Feb 2019 04:03:16 -0800, "Julie Bove"
wrote:


snip

Our snow here is different. East Coast snow is dryer. West Coast snow is
heavy and wet. Forms a thick layer of ice almost instantly. And they use
salt/sand or chemicals on the East Coast.


Not true, every place gets all different kinds of snow

But, but, but I thought it was common knowledge and accepted by all that Ju-Ju
speaks for the whole west coast! Are you telling us she is n.o.t the authority
she claims to be??? Oh the horror, heartbreak, and disappointment. I am
sorely bereaved to learn this.




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Old 13-02-2019, 12:39 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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writes:

"tert in seattle" wrote in message
...


I'm scheduled to report for jury duty tomorrow, so regardless of what
Mother Nature decides, the disruptions to normal routine will continue
for me.


Still bad out here in the burbs. All of my Drs. offices are closed until
perhaps Wed. Most of the people I know were told to stay home from work.
None of the side streets get plowed. The main roads do, but there is so much
ice on them and the plows can't remove the ice.

KIRO radio said the stores are scrambling to get stuff restocked. I've been
pretty much stuck here. I did go out for prescriptions at Bartells and
picked up a few things that they sell like shelf stable cheese, crackers and
boxed soup. Also placed a small Amazon Fresh order. They couldn't guarantee
that they would deliver it but it did come. Now other orders that I placed
over a week ago seem to have gotten lost.


I got out of jury duty which was a good thing because I wasn't going to
drive anywhere this morning, and the transit being on emergency snow
routes meant it would take a ridiculous amount of time to get to the
courthouse. AND I've fulfilled my obligation, considered to have served.
Nice!

A couple hours ago I launched out of my parking spot on the street with
some assistance from chains - not sure it would have worked without them.
But soon enough I was on wet pavement so I took them off. Fred Meyer was
back to normal, everything was in stock *except* my favorite bread from
Grand Central Bakery, which didn't surprise me. On the way home I said
****it and didn't bother putting the chains back on. I used momentum to
cruise down my slushy/snowy/icy street and get back into my parking space.
My 20 years' experience driving in snow came in handy, as did a bit of
good luck.

My neighbor who has Montana plates managed to turn around and get out
of her parking space and head in the opposite direction from how she had
parked, with no chains and just FWD (no snow tires either). I was getting
ready to head out and help but she managed all on her own. That was
impressive.


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Old 13-02-2019, 12:53 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Tue, 12 Feb 2019 15:01:35 -0500, Dave Smith
wrote:

On 2019-02-12 2:02 p.m., wrote:
On Tue, 12 Feb 2019 11:31:48 -0500, Dave Smith
wrote:

On 2019-02-12 7:04 a.m.,
wrote:
On Mon, 11 Feb 2019 20:01:44 -0800 (PST), "

We've got a fleet of snow plows as well as mountains of salt ready to be used.
However, we don't use sand.

Outside the city we use sand only - people have wells and salt
draining from the road is deadly.



Really? Nova Scotia has modified its approach to winter road
maintenance by using more efficient methods of salting, but it still
uses a lot of salt on its roads. For a number of years they have been
applying it proactively, applying a salt solution to the roads before
the snow starts.

Well salt pollution is not much of an issue in rural areas. There is
relatively little salt used per unit area compared to urban areas where
there are many more roads and higher standards. My well is only about 60
feet from the road and I have no salt issues.


Yes, really. In town and also on the highways they are using the
pre-brining solution, very successfully, but wells don't abut
highways.

Okay, they are using brine instead of salt. The brine is salt. They are
still using salt, but less of it.


It would also depend on whether your well is a dug or drilled well,
still many dug wells operating happily in NS.


My well is dug. It probably picks up more salt from me salting my
sidewalk than it does from the road.


You can't be living rural if you have sidewalks, even most of
surburbia here has no sidewalks... only urbanites have sidewalks. No
rural canucks have sidewalks. Most of rural and surburban Canada has
no paved roads let alone sidewalks.



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