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Old 12-02-2019, 05:11 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 2019-02-11 11:01 p.m., wrote:
On Monday, February 11, 2019 at 8:41:30 PM UTC-6, Dave Smith wrote:

Yes, I realize that you don't often get significant amounts of snow, but
there is a huge difference between what you think is a significant
amount and what people further north think is significant. It has a lot
to do with the road and highway departments not having the resources to
deal with it. It costs a lot of money to have a fleet of trucks on hand
for sanding and flowing operations. When we get some freezing rain or
snow we sand the roads for traction, and plows to clear heavier amounts
of snow. Since you don't have the means to deal with the stuff it gets
packed down and turns to ice, and there is no traction on ice.

We've got a fleet of snow plows as well as mountains of salt ready to be used.
However, we don't use sand.


We use a lot more sand than salt. Salt usually goes on at the beginning
of a storm. It doesn't melt snow. It lowers the freezing temperature. It
is used to form a "brine sandwich", a layer of slush, so that the plows
can slip under the snow and push it off the road. Otherwise, the plows
just ride up over the packed snow. Then they use sand, which is mixed
with just enough salt to stop it from freezing into big lumps. In
addition to providing traction, the dark material attacts light/heat.

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Old 12-02-2019, 12:05 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Monday, February 11, 2019 at 4:33:35 PM UTC-5, Bruce wrote:
On Mon, 11 Feb 2019 16:32:12 -0500, Dave Smith
wrote:

On 2019-02-11 3:00 p.m., Ed Pawlowski wrote:

When I lived in Philadelphia, that was common.* In New England, no big
deal.* People were batter at driving in snow and the highway crews are
better equipped to deal with it.* In all my years in CT, if I could get
out my driveway I could get to the store.


We always get a chuckle over the traffic chaos that results from very
small amounts of snow in the lower half of the US. It seems that is
takes only about a half inch of snow to bring the transportation
infrastructure to its knees.


Wait until you get a tiny hurricane.


We call 'em tornadoes

This far inland, hurricanes arrive pretty well spent. A few days of
rain or gloomy weather is about as far as it goes.

Cindy Hamilton
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Old 12-02-2019, 12:13 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Monday, February 11, 2019 at 10:55:17 PM UTC-5, dsi1 wrote:

A lot of times, a little rain on this rock will cause traffic accidents. I can't say why that is except that we don't like driving in rain. Things are a lot different in the Pacific Northwest. Those guys love driving fast in the rain. The cars on the freeway will have roostertails behind them. I thought those guys were nuttier than heck!


A little rain can be worse than a lot of rain. Oil on the road floats
on top of the water and makes it easier to slide. A lot of rain will
wash the oil away, leaving a better surface.

Cindy Hamilton
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Old 12-02-2019, 12:14 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Monday, February 11, 2019 at 11:01:47 PM UTC-5, wrote:
On Monday, February 11, 2019 at 8:41:30 PM UTC-6, Dave Smith wrote:

Yes, I realize that you don't often get significant amounts of snow, but
there is a huge difference between what you think is a significant
amount and what people further north think is significant. It has a lot
to do with the road and highway departments not having the resources to
deal with it. It costs a lot of money to have a fleet of trucks on hand
for sanding and flowing operations. When we get some freezing rain or
snow we sand the roads for traction, and plows to clear heavier amounts
of snow. Since you don't have the means to deal with the stuff it gets
packed down and turns to ice, and there is no traction on ice.

We've got a fleet of snow plows as well as mountains of salt ready to be used.
However, we don't use sand.


I'm listening to the tick of ice pellets on the window next to me. By the
time I'm ready to go to work, the roads will be salted and I'll be doing
45 mph.

Cindy Hamilton
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Old 12-02-2019, 12:56 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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"tert in seattle" wrote in message
...
People panicked here in the Seattle area last Thursday, as evidenced
by my local Fred Meyer being completely out of shopping carts when I
arrived around 6pm to pick up a few things. I had done my major shopping
the day before and as always I managed to forget something. I soon found
where all the shopping carts had gone - they were manned by restive
customers standing in lines 20 deep, going halfway up the aisles. I
must say things were pretty calm despite the gridlock and lack of
essentials like bread and bananas. Fortunately I had "about 12 items"
and the express lane lines were more reasonable.

Friday I left work around 12:30 and headed toward the kids' school.
I thought I might grab a bite for lunch before their early dismissal
at 2:15 due to impending snow. Sure enough the flakes started coming
down hard around 12:45 so I went straight to the school and after
about 30 minutes had rounded up both my kids and we were on our way.
Our trip home usually takes about 25 minutes but on Friday everyone
decided to hit the roads at the same time so it took us two hours,
mostly due to gridlock in the Central District. Fortunately I had
pizza and clif bars for us to munch on during the journey. My main
concern was my bladder but it still had some room left by the time we
got home.

Friday's dinner was bratwurst with sauerkraut and fried potatoes and
a tossed salad. Saturday's breakfast was pancakes and bacon. Then we
went out to play in the snow. We came back in for some pasta with red
sauce, and discussed what our afternoon adventure would be. Well we knew
we wanted to go sledding, it was just a matter of where. I tried my
chains and decided after driving a couple blocks that maybe it's better
to walk to the nearest hill rather than drive, park in the snow and not
be certain if my car could get moving again. I'll save driving for when
it's necessary.

After sledding we came home to warm up and have some sandwiches.
The boys' mom came to pick them up and I was on my own. I had the
leftover brats and sauerkraut for dinner and some chips. Ice cream
for dessert.

Sunday morning I tried Bob's Red Mill "Organic Whole Grain High Fiber
Hot Cereal" for the first time. I bought it because I've been wanting
to try something organic and they didn't have organic steel cut oats,
and I thought this might be the next best thing. Well, the texture is
about a 1.5 on a scale to 10. There's nothing to really chew on, and
it's got this glutionus almost rubbery consistency. The added butter and
almond milk helped a little but I think all hope is lost here as far as
an enjoyable eating experience. My homemade breakfast sausage offset
the unpleasantness enough that I could choke down all that fiber. There's
a recipe for muffins on the bag which I may attempt, although I will
be prepared for a rubbery result.

I wanted to make my lentil soup but didn't have any ginger so I decided
to take a different approach. One of my kids loves that recipe but the
other one says "there's some weird taste in there" which I suspect if
not the lentils themselves might be the cumin. So I came up with something
that tastes good with no cumin: tomato sauce and oregano! Here's the
procedu dice one carrot and one celery stalk, fry in oil of your
choice (I choose olive) and then add some minced garlic. Once they're
all tender add 4c veg stock and 1c lentils. Let that cook for a while
and add 1c tomato sauce, and oregano. Easy, and very tasty.

After fortifying myself with a large portion of this lentil soup I
headed out for a walk. The residential streets don't get plowed here
but the arterials were wet or slushy. I didn't see a lot of cars driving
around.

Dinner was a massive BLT with dill pickles. I took my other BOGO pork
shoulder out of the freezer on Friday in anticipation of being stuck for
several more days, but temps are rising and this may all be over by
tomorrow if the rains come and wash all the snow away. But the rain could
freeze, too - so it'll be roast pork for dinner, with carrots and
potatoes.

I'm scheduled to report for jury duty tomorrow, so regardless of what
Mother Nature decides, the disruptions to normal routine will continue
for me.


Still bad out here in the burbs. All of my Drs. offices are closed until
perhaps Wed. Most of the people I know were told to stay home from work.
None of the side streets get plowed. The main roads do, but there is so much
ice on them and the plows can't remove the ice.

KIRO radio said the stores are scrambling to get stuff restocked. I've been
pretty much stuck here. I did go out for prescriptions at Bartells and
picked up a few things that they sell like shelf stable cheese, crackers and
boxed soup. Also placed a small Amazon Fresh order. They couldn't guarantee
that they would deliver it but it did come. Now other orders that I placed
over a week ago seem to have gotten lost.



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Old 12-02-2019, 12:58 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default snow big deal


wrote in message
...
On Monday, February 11, 2019 at 12:40:05 PM UTC-6, tert in seattle wrote:

People panicked here in the Seattle area last Thursday, as evidenced
by my local Fred Meyer being completely out of shopping carts when I
arrived around 6pm to pick up a few things. I had done my major shopping
the day before and as always I managed to forget something. I soon found
where all the shopping carts had gone - they were manned by restive
customers standing in lines 20 deep, going halfway up the aisles.

Sounds like a typical snow day here in the South.

https://i.postimg.cc/fyb1N3MW/Snow-Day-in-the-South.jpg


Day? This has been going on for quite a few days and no end in sight!

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Old 12-02-2019, 01:03 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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"Ed Pawlowski" wrote in message
...
On 2/11/2019 1:34 PM, tert in seattle wrote:
People panicked here in the Seattle area last Thursday, as evidenced
by my local Fred Meyer being completely out of shopping carts when I
arrived around 6pm to pick up a few things. I had done my major shopping
the day before and as always I managed to forget something. I soon found
where all the shopping carts had gone - they were manned by restive
customers standing in lines 20 deep, going halfway up the aisles. I
must say things were pretty calm despite the gridlock and lack of
essentials like bread and bananas. Fortunately I had "about 12 items"
and the express lane lines were more reasonable.


When I lived in Philadelphia, that was common. In New England, no big
deal. People were batter at driving in snow and the highway crews are
better equipped to deal with it. In all my years in CT, if I could get
out my driveway I could get to the store.


Our snow here is different. East Coast snow is dryer. West Coast snow is
heavy and wet. Forms a thick layer of ice almost instantly. And they use
salt/sand or chemicals on the East Coast.

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Old 12-02-2019, 01:04 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default snow big deal

On Mon, 11 Feb 2019 20:01:44 -0800 (PST), "
wrote:

On Monday, February 11, 2019 at 8:41:30 PM UTC-6, Dave Smith wrote:

Yes, I realize that you don't often get significant amounts of snow, but
there is a huge difference between what you think is a significant
amount and what people further north think is significant. It has a lot
to do with the road and highway departments not having the resources to
deal with it. It costs a lot of money to have a fleet of trucks on hand
for sanding and flowing operations. When we get some freezing rain or
snow we sand the roads for traction, and plows to clear heavier amounts
of snow. Since you don't have the means to deal with the stuff it gets
packed down and turns to ice, and there is no traction on ice.

We've got a fleet of snow plows as well as mountains of salt ready to be used.
However, we don't use sand.


Outside the city we use sand only - people have wells and salt
draining from the road is deadly.
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Old 12-02-2019, 03:04 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Tuesday, February 12, 2019 at 7:03:23 AM UTC-5, Julie Bove wrote:
"Ed Pawlowski" wrote in message
...
On 2/11/2019 1:34 PM, tert in seattle wrote:
People panicked here in the Seattle area last Thursday, as evidenced
by my local Fred Meyer being completely out of shopping carts when I
arrived around 6pm to pick up a few things. I had done my major shopping
the day before and as always I managed to forget something. I soon found
where all the shopping carts had gone - they were manned by restive
customers standing in lines 20 deep, going halfway up the aisles. I
must say things were pretty calm despite the gridlock and lack of
essentials like bread and bananas. Fortunately I had "about 12 items"
and the express lane lines were more reasonable.


When I lived in Philadelphia, that was common. In New England, no big
deal. People were batter at driving in snow and the highway crews are
better equipped to deal with it. In all my years in CT, if I could get
out my driveway I could get to the store.


Our snow here is different. East Coast snow is dryer. West Coast snow is
heavy and wet. Forms a thick layer of ice almost instantly. And they use
salt/sand or chemicals on the East Coast.


Bullshit. Everyplace that gets snow gets a variety of snow.

Hey, Seattle--can we give you your weather back? We got an inch
of snow, a quarter inch of ice pellets, followed by rain.

The roads are ok because they've been running the salt trucks
pretty much constantly, but the parking lot at work is glare ice.

Cindy Hamilton
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Old 12-02-2019, 03:14 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Julie Bove wrote:

Our snow here is different.


LMAO Bothel is so unique. Someone should make a documentary
about it.

East Coast snow is dryer. West Coast snow is
heavy and wet.


Failed belief. Here in the mid east coast, our rare snow is
mostly always heavy and wet.

Get real, Julie. ;/

BTW... still not a single flake of snowfall here in Virginia
Beach this winter...very rare. Actually this will be the first
ever since I moved here in 1973


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Old 12-02-2019, 03:31 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 2019-02-12 6:05 a.m., Cindy Hamilton wrote:
On Monday, February 11, 2019 at 4:33:35 PM UTC-5, Bruce wrote:
On Mon, 11 Feb 2019 16:32:12 -0500, Dave Smith
wrote:

On 2019-02-11 3:00 p.m., Ed Pawlowski wrote:

When I lived in Philadelphia, that was common.* In New England, no big
deal.* People were batter at driving in snow and the highway crews are
better equipped to deal with it.* In all my years in CT, if I could get
out my driveway I could get to the store.

We always get a chuckle over the traffic chaos that results from very
small amounts of snow in the lower half of the US. It seems that is
takes only about a half inch of snow to bring the transportation
infrastructure to its knees.


Wait until you get a tiny hurricane.


We call 'em tornadoes

This far inland, hurricanes arrive pretty well spent. A few days of
rain or gloomy weather is about as far as it goes.


The last hurricane we had was Hazel in 1954. The last real blizzard was
1977. I only remember one small tornado. It tore down the screes at
the drive in where Twister was scheduled to run that evening. We
occasionally see high water, but not flooding. It is pretty boring.
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Old 12-02-2019, 03:49 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 2/12/2019 9:14 AM, Gary wrote:
\

BTW... still not a single flake of snowfall here in Virginia
Beach this winter...very rare. Actually this will be the first
ever since I moved here in 1973


Maybe, but it is only mid February. I remember one year thinking it was
over and had a blizzard on April Fools Day.
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Old 12-02-2019, 04:10 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Tuesday, February 12, 2019 at 9:30:20 AM UTC-5, Dave Smith wrote:
On 2019-02-12 6:05 a.m., Cindy Hamilton wrote:
On Monday, February 11, 2019 at 4:33:35 PM UTC-5, Bruce wrote:
On Mon, 11 Feb 2019 16:32:12 -0500, Dave Smith
wrote:

On 2019-02-11 3:00 p.m., Ed Pawlowski wrote:

When I lived in Philadelphia, that was common.* In New England, no big
deal.* People were batter at driving in snow and the highway crews are
better equipped to deal with it.* In all my years in CT, if I could get
out my driveway I could get to the store.

We always get a chuckle over the traffic chaos that results from very
small amounts of snow in the lower half of the US. It seems that is
takes only about a half inch of snow to bring the transportation
infrastructure to its knees.

Wait until you get a tiny hurricane.


We call 'em tornadoes

This far inland, hurricanes arrive pretty well spent. A few days of
rain or gloomy weather is about as far as it goes.


The last hurricane we had was Hazel in 1954. The last real blizzard was
1977. I only remember one small tornado. It tore down the screes at
the drive in where Twister was scheduled to run that evening. We
occasionally see high water, but not flooding. It is pretty boring.


And that's why we like it here. No, it's not glamorous. But
mainly the weather doesn't kill you. Nor does the geology.
Oh, sure, some people freeze to death every winter, and
drown in floods and stuff. But no wholesale slaughter by
Mother Nature. Nice and boring.

Cindy Hamilton
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Old 12-02-2019, 04:12 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default snow big deal

Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Gary wrote:
BTW... still not a single flake of snowfall here in Virginia
Beach this winter...very rare. Actually this will be the first
ever since I moved here in 1973


Maybe, but it is only mid February. I remember one year thinking it was
over and had a blizzard on April Fools Day.


I did hesitate to mention my lack of snow, least I jinx myself.
In the past, some of our largest snowfalls were in the end of
February. No cold or snow forcast in the next 7 days but yes, all
winter hell could show up in the last 10 days of February.

It's never snowed much in March except a few inches in the first
week one year. I ran a 5K race that day.

Anyway, I always enjoy a good snow here since no matter how much,
it all melts within a few days. I'm still "kid" enough to enjoy
snow days and I always cheer it on...deeper the better. And we
just don't go to work in severe, very rare snow so no need to
drive in it dangerously. Deep snow days for me is always 'snow
days off' just like the kids in school. Stay home. Only go out
to have fun and play in it. I still do.

Your snow days are all behind you now, Ed.
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Old 12-02-2019, 05:07 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Tue, 12 Feb 2019 04:03:16 -0800, "Julie Bove"
wrote:


snip

Our snow here is different. East Coast snow is dryer. West Coast snow is
heavy and wet. Forms a thick layer of ice almost instantly. And they use
salt/sand or chemicals on the East Coast.


Not true, every place gets all different kinds of snow


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