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On Fri, 12 Feb 2016 16:17:00 -1000, dsi1 > wrote:

>On 2/12/2016 4:05 PM, Janet B wrote:
>> On Fri, 12 Feb 2016 15:36:44 -1000, dsi1 > wrote:
>> snip
>>>
>>> As far as fried rice is concerned, calling fried rice a pilaf is an
>>> insult to two great dishes. We're quite serious about fried rice over
>>> here. Kim chee fried rice is a most wonderful dish.
>>>
>>> http://www.bubbleworld.ca/resources/upload/DSC0043.jpg

>>
>> Just in case you think I said that fried rice was a pilaf, no, I did
>> not. Nor did I imply so.
>> Janet US
>>

>
>Let's face it, there's not many people that would boldly state that
>fried rice is a pilaf - even on a technicality. OTOH, I suppose
>technically, a rat is the same as a polar bear. Topologically speaking,
>of course.


each has 4 feet and that explains it all, No?
Janet US
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On 2/12/2016 4:37 PM, Janet B wrote:
> On Fri, 12 Feb 2016 16:17:00 -1000, dsi1 > wrote:
>
>> On 2/12/2016 4:05 PM, Janet B wrote:
>>> On Fri, 12 Feb 2016 15:36:44 -1000, dsi1 > wrote:
>>> snip
>>>>
>>>> As far as fried rice is concerned, calling fried rice a pilaf is an
>>>> insult to two great dishes. We're quite serious about fried rice over
>>>> here. Kim chee fried rice is a most wonderful dish.
>>>>
>>>> http://www.bubbleworld.ca/resources/upload/DSC0043.jpg
>>>
>>> Just in case you think I said that fried rice was a pilaf, no, I did
>>> not. Nor did I imply so.
>>> Janet US
>>>

>>
>> Let's face it, there's not many people that would boldly state that
>> fried rice is a pilaf - even on a technicality. OTOH, I suppose
>> technically, a rat is the same as a polar bear. Topologically speaking,
>> of course.

>
> each has 4 feet and that explains it all, No?
> Janet US
>


That's right! I'll bet that sometimes a rat will eat a seal too!
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jmcquown wrote:
> On 2/11/2016 8:38 PM, cshenk wrote:
>> Don't be too suprised if the taste of brown doesnt appeal. Some love
>> it (I like it for a variation) but some dislike it (Don and Charlotte).
>> It's specifically the nutty flavor they feel off putting in a rice.

>
> Don't forget, wild rice is *not* rice. It's grass seed. I love it
> but I don't want to eat it all the time. Definitely not enough to
> think about buying a case of canned wild rice.
>
> Jill

True dat!

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"cshenk" > wrote in message
...
> Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>
>>
>> "cshenk" > wrote in message
>> ...
>> > Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>> >
>> > >
>> >>"cshenk" > wrote in message
>> > > ...
>> >>> Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>> > > >
>> >>> >
>> > wrote in message
>> >>> > ...
>> >>>>> I like canned spanish rice.
>> >>> >
>> >>> > I bought some many years ago that was good. Can't remember the
>> >>> > brand or where I was living when I bought it. But the only kind
>> >>> > I can find now in a can isn't good.
>> > > >
>> >>> I have never noticed canned rice. Could be they don't sell it
>> >>> here. I do recall a rather nice small can at HEB in San Antonio
>> >>> Texas that was a premade 'spanish rice' seasonings. You added it
>> >>> to cooked rice.
>> > > >
>> >>> Fortunately for me I have a rice machine (small unit) so even if I
>> >>> don't feel like cooking, that one is easy. If I'm really lazy, I
>> >>> ask my daughter to make it (grin).
>> > >
>> > > I most likely bought it at the military commissary and as I'm sure
>> > > you know, they often sell things that you can't get elsewhere.
>> > > But how can you do Spanish rice in a rice machine? How would you
>> > > brown it?
>> >
>> > Smile, you make the rice then brown it if that particular recipe
>> > calls for browning at all. Fact is there are so many varieties of
>> > 'spanish or mexican rice' that it's very possible you are used to
>> > making it almost rice-a-roni ish where you brown the rice in butter
>> > then add the water and seasonings?

>>
>> That makes no sense. The rice should be browned before cooking for
>> Spanish rice. And I don't use butter but olive oil. But yes, that
>> is how it should be done.

>
> Julie, just because you havent seen it, doesn't make it so. You are
> doing pilaf. I am not. Nuff said?


No. I am most assuredly not doing pilaf. I looked that up. What I make is
not pilaf.
>
>> > Others use fresh cooked rice which is then lightly stir fried in
>> > butter and olive oil then added spices and tomatoes are added.

>>
>> Have never ever seen such a recipe. Never.

>
> Want to see one? Or want to deny they exist? Choice is yours.


There might be recipes but they wouldn't be authentic.
>
>
>> > A simple sort that is soft and works well is to make a batch of rice
>> > (you'd want about 3 cups yield at least) then add Ro-Tel (or a store
>> > knock off) and heat then serve. Some heat the ro-tel separate in
>> > the microwave then use it to top the rice. While not haute
>> > cuisine, it's simple and fast and in your house may be more
>> > effective since people could chose to top the rice with that or
>> > something else.

>>
>> No thanks. That is not how I make it at all. Actually I don't make
>> it at all now since I was the only one who really liked it. And I
>> can't have rice now. For me, Spanish rice has meat in it and is a
>> meal. Mexican rice shouldn't have any chunks of stuff in it. Unless
>> of course you are doing something like cilantro lime rice.

>
> ???? Wierd. I've not seen a spanish rice with meat in it unless it was
> highly americanized or trying to pretend to be a mix of asian shrimp
> fried rice with tomato topping..


We ate it a lot when I was growing up. Here is one such but I certainly
didn't use all of those ingredients. One of my cookbooks has a recipe that
uses bacon instead of beef.

http://www.tasteofhome.com/recipes/spanish-rice-dinner

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"cshenk" > wrote in message
...
> Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>
>>
>> "Janet B" > wrote in message
>> ... >On Thu, 11 Feb
>> 2016 19:51:40 -0600, "cshenk" > wrote:
>> >
>> > > Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>> > >
>> > > >
>> >>>"cshenk" > wrote in message
>> > > > ...
>> >>>> Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>> > > > >
>> >>>> >
>> > wrote in message
>> >>>> > ...
>> >>>>>> I like canned spanish rice.
>> >>>> >
>> >>>> > I bought some many years ago that was good. Can't remember the
>> >>>> > brand or where I was living when I bought it. But the only

>> kind >>>> > I can find now in a can isn't good.
>> > > > >
>> >>>> I have never noticed canned rice. Could be they don't sell it
>> >>>> here. I do recall a rather nice small can at HEB in San Antonio
>> >>>> Texas that was a premade 'spanish rice' seasonings. You added it
>> >>>> to cooked rice.
>> > > > >
>> >>>> Fortunately for me I have a rice machine (small unit) so even if

>> I >>>> don't feel like cooking, that one is easy. If I'm really
>> lazy, I >>>> ask my daughter to make it (grin).
>> > > >
>> > > > I most likely bought it at the military commissary and as I'm
>> > > > sure you know, they often sell things that you can't get
>> > > > elsewhere. But how can you do Spanish rice in a rice machine?
>> > > > How would you brown it?
>> > >
>> > > Smile, you make the rice then brown it if that particular recipe
>> > > calls for browning at all. Fact is there are so many varieties
>> > > of 'spanish or mexican rice' that it's very possible you are used
>> > > to making it almost rice-a-roni ish where you brown the rice in
>> > > butter then add the water and seasonings?
>> > >
>> > > Others use fresh cooked rice which is then lightly stir fried in
>> > > butter and olive oil then added spices and tomatoes are added.
>> > >
>> > > A simple sort that is soft and works well is to make a batch of
>> > > rice (you'd want about 3 cups yield at least) then add Ro-Tel (or
>> > > a store knock off) and heat then serve. Some heat the ro-tel
>> > > separate in the microwave then use it to top the rice. While not
>> > > haute cuisine, it's simple and fast and in your house may be more
>> > > effective since people could chose to top the rice with that or
>> > > something else.
>> >
>> > The dish is a pilaf and is thousands of years old. Pilaf exists
>> > every where in the world and is made according to local traditions
>> > Generally the basics are rice is 'browned' in a fat, cooked in a
>> > broth and meats/vegetables are added. Rice a Roni, a rice and
>> > pasta dish is still a pilaf.
>> > Janet US

>>
>> Not according to this:
>>
>> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pilaf

>
> Julie, if you look up PILAF, of course you wil get PILAF.


I have *no* clue what you are trying to say.



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"dsi1" > wrote in message
...
> On 2/12/2016 3:50 PM, Brooklyn1 wrote:
>> On Fri, 12 Feb 2016 10:30:40 -1000, dsi1
>> > wrote:
>>
>>> On 2/12/2016 10:11 AM, Julie Bove wrote:
>>>>
>>>> "dsi1" > wrote in message
>>>> ...
>>>> On Friday, February 12, 2016 at 8:50:16 AM UTC-10, Brooklyn1 wrote:
>>>>> On Thu, 11 Feb 2016 20:50:07 -0700, Janet B >
>>>>> wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>> On Thu, 11 Feb 2016 19:51:40 -0600, "cshenk" > wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> "cshenk" > wrote in message
>>>>>>>> ...
>>>>>>>>> Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>> > wrote in message
>>>>>>>>>> ...
>>>>>>>>>>> I like canned spanish rice.
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>> I bought some many years ago that was good. Can't remember the
>>>>>>>>>> brand or where I was living when I bought it. But the only kind
>>>>>>>>>> I can find now in a can isn't good.
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> I have never noticed canned rice. Could be they don't sell it
>>>>>>>>> here. I *do* recall a rather nice small can at HEB in San Antonio
>>>>>>>>> Texas that was a premade 'spanish rice' seasonings. You added it
>>>>>>>>> to cooked rice.
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> Fortunately for me I have a rice machine (small unit) so even if I
>>>>>>>>> don't feel like cooking, that one is easy. If I'm really lazy, I
>>>>>>>>> ask my daughter to make it (grin).
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> I most likely bought it at the military commissary and as I'm sure
>>>>>>>> you know, they often sell things that you can't get elsewhere. But
>>>>>>>> how can you do Spanish rice in a rice machine? How would you brown
>>>>>>>> it?
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Smile, you make the rice then brown it if that particular recipe
>>>>>>> calls
>>>>>>> for browning at all. Fact is there are so many varieties of
>>>>>>> 'spanish
>>>>>>> or mexican rice' that it's very possible you are used to making it
>>>>>>> almost rice-a-roni ish where you brown the rice in butter then add
>>>>>>> the
>>>>>>> water and seasonings?
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Others use fresh cooked rice which is then lightly stir fried in
>>>>>>> butter
>>>>>>> and olive oil then added spices and tomatoes are added.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> A simple sort that is soft and works well is to make a batch of rice
>>>>>>> (you'd want about 3 cups yield at least) then add Ro-Tel (or a store
>>>>>>> knock off) and heat then serve. Some heat the ro-tel separate in
>>>>>>> the
>>>>>>> microwave then use it to top the rice. While not haute cuisine,
>>>>>>> it's
>>>>>>> simple and fast and in your house may be more effective since people
>>>>>>> could chose to top the rice with that or something else.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> The dish is a pilaf and is thousands of years old. Pilaf exists
>>>>>> every
>>>>>> where in the world and is made according to local traditions
>>>>>> Generally
>>>>>> the basics are rice is 'browned' in a fat, cooked in a broth and
>>>>>> meats/vegetables are added. Rice a Roni, a rice and pasta dish is
>>>>>> still a pilaf.
>>>>>> Janet US
>>>>>
>>>>> Pilaf is one of the most widely consumed dishes on the planet, most
>>>>> every ethnicity has a basic version, frying the grains is not
>>>>> manditory, most ethnicities do ny fry the rice prior to adding liquid,
>>>>> in fact most rice that's fried is fried after cooking in liquid, as in
>>>>> Chinese Fly Lice which is technically a pilaf.
>>>>> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pilaf
>>>>
>>>> Asians don't ever cook rice in any kind of broth. I suppose some might
>>>> but I've never seen it happen. Fried rice is prepared with pre-cooked
>>>> white rice. I suppose some trendy restaurants might use brown rice but
>>>> I've never seen it. There is jook, which is a popular soup made with
>>>> rice but it's always made cooked white rice. Asians are unabashedly
>>>> unoriginal when it comes to cooking rice.
>>>>
>>>> ---
>>>>
>>>> Some Asian places here do offer brown rice or even brown fried rice but
>>>> they are the Americanized places. Asians don't put salt or fat in the
>>>> rice either. My friend was horrified when I told her how I made rice
>>>> as
>>>> she only ever makes the Japanese style.
>>>
>>> Asians would be surprised to learn that some Westerners don't wash their
>>> rice before cooking. It's just not in my DNA to follow that practice.

>>
>> Thats because rice grown in the US is clean, imported rice is
>> disgustingly filthy with human and other animal excrement. I won't
>> buy imported rice. Asians are the most disgustingly filthy people on
>> this planet... the vast majority of Asians go from birth to grave
>> without ever bathing.
>>

>
> Man, I love this place!


This is funny. I just got off of the phone with a friend who was married to
a Japanese man who is no longer with us. She said the Japanese are
fastidious, especially when it comes to the kitchen.

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On Fri, 12 Feb 2016 21:37:29 -0800, "Julie Bove"
> wrote:

>
>"dsi1" > wrote in message
...
>> On 2/12/2016 3:50 PM, Brooklyn1 wrote:


>>> Thats because rice grown in the US is clean, imported rice is
>>> disgustingly filthy with human and other animal excrement. I won't
>>> buy imported rice. Asians are the most disgustingly filthy people on
>>> this planet... the vast majority of Asians go from birth to grave
>>> without ever bathing.
>>>

>>
>> Man, I love this place!

>
>This is funny. I just got off of the phone with a friend who was married to
>a Japanese man who is no longer with us. She said the Japanese are
>fastidious, especially when it comes to the kitchen.


I guess it's always a bit risky to make blanket statements about a few
billion people

--
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On Wednesday, February 10, 2016 at 11:42:10 AM UTC-6, Janet B wrote:
> On Wed, 10 Feb 2016 09:34:36 -0600, Sqwertz >
> wrote:
>
> >On Wed, 10 Feb 2016 07:57:36 -0500, Gary wrote:
> >
> >> Julie Bove wrote:
> >>>
> >>> I finally had a reason to try it. Have been not feeling well on and off for
> >>> days and really didn't feel up to cooking just now but wanted soup. So I
> >>> used this to make a chicken soup and yes, I used canned chicken as well.
> >>> And the end result? Just exactly like it comes out when I cook the rice
> >>> myself. I am happy!
> >>
> >> This is good news, Julie. You bought a case based on good reviews.
> >> Good that you tried one before you might depend on it. Now you know
> >> it's a good thing.

> >
> >It's still that nasty cultured wild rice. True wild rice is so much
> >better than those skinny black mouse turds.
> >
> >http://www.mooselakewildrice.com/
> >
> >-sw

>
> "Cultured Wild Rice?" I wasn't able to find a good reference for
> this. I see there are farmers? who intentionally grow wild rice in
> swamp land they have developed. I don't think that's what you mean?
> I'm hung up on the term cultured (like cultured pearls) vs.
> cultivated. Explain more please.
> Janet US


Only Heirloom True Wild Rice, eh?

John Kuthe...
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On Friday, February 12, 2016 at 7:37:36 PM UTC-10, Julie Bove wrote:
>
> This is funny. I just got off of the phone with a friend who was married to
> a Japanese man who is no longer with us. She said the Japanese are
> fastidious, especially when it comes to the kitchen.


Yes they are and perhaps overly so. Wearing a facemask in public is socially acceptable and it's expected if one has a cold. I wish people would do that here.

The idea of a guy too ignorant/lazy to wash rice before cooking it complaining about the cleanliness of others boggles the mind. I mean, you cannot make this stuff up!
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On 13/02/2016 12:54 PM, dsi1 wrote:
> On 2/12/2016 3:50 PM, Brooklyn1 wrote:
>> On Fri, 12 Feb 2016 10:30:40 -1000, dsi1
>> > wrote:
>>
>>> On 2/12/2016 10:11 AM, Julie Bove wrote:
>>>>
>>>> "dsi1" > wrote in message
>>>> ...
>>>> On Friday, February 12, 2016 at 8:50:16 AM UTC-10, Brooklyn1 wrote:
>>>>> On Thu, 11 Feb 2016 20:50:07 -0700, Janet B >
>>>>> wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>> On Thu, 11 Feb 2016 19:51:40 -0600, "cshenk" > wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> "cshenk" > wrote in message
>>>>>>>> ...
>>>>>>>>> Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>> > wrote in message
>>>>>>>>>> ...
>>>>>>>>>>> I like canned spanish rice.
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>> I bought some many years ago that was good. Can't remember the
>>>>>>>>>> brand or where I was living when I bought it. But the only kind
>>>>>>>>>> I can find now in a can isn't good.
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> I have never noticed canned rice. Could be they don't sell it
>>>>>>>>> here. I *do* recall a rather nice small can at HEB in San Antonio
>>>>>>>>> Texas that was a premade 'spanish rice' seasonings. You added it
>>>>>>>>> to cooked rice.
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> Fortunately for me I have a rice machine (small unit) so even if I
>>>>>>>>> don't feel like cooking, that one is easy. If I'm really lazy, I
>>>>>>>>> ask my daughter to make it (grin).
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> I most likely bought it at the military commissary and as I'm sure
>>>>>>>> you know, they often sell things that you can't get elsewhere. But
>>>>>>>> how can you do Spanish rice in a rice machine? How would you brown
>>>>>>>> it?
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Smile, you make the rice then brown it if that particular recipe
>>>>>>> calls
>>>>>>> for browning at all. Fact is there are so many varieties of
>>>>>>> 'spanish
>>>>>>> or mexican rice' that it's very possible you are used to making it
>>>>>>> almost rice-a-roni ish where you brown the rice in butter then
>>>>>>> add the
>>>>>>> water and seasonings?
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Others use fresh cooked rice which is then lightly stir fried in
>>>>>>> butter
>>>>>>> and olive oil then added spices and tomatoes are added.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> A simple sort that is soft and works well is to make a batch of rice
>>>>>>> (you'd want about 3 cups yield at least) then add Ro-Tel (or a store
>>>>>>> knock off) and heat then serve. Some heat the ro-tel separate in
>>>>>>> the
>>>>>>> microwave then use it to top the rice. While not haute cuisine,
>>>>>>> it's
>>>>>>> simple and fast and in your house may be more effective since people
>>>>>>> could chose to top the rice with that or something else.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> The dish is a pilaf and is thousands of years old. Pilaf exists
>>>>>> every
>>>>>> where in the world and is made according to local traditions
>>>>>> Generally
>>>>>> the basics are rice is 'browned' in a fat, cooked in a broth and
>>>>>> meats/vegetables are added. Rice a Roni, a rice and pasta dish is
>>>>>> still a pilaf.
>>>>>> Janet US
>>>>>
>>>>> Pilaf is one of the most widely consumed dishes on the planet, most
>>>>> every ethnicity has a basic version, frying the grains is not
>>>>> manditory, most ethnicities do ny fry the rice prior to adding liquid,
>>>>> in fact most rice that's fried is fried after cooking in liquid, as in
>>>>> Chinese Fly Lice which is technically a pilaf.
>>>>> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pilaf
>>>>
>>>> Asians don't ever cook rice in any kind of broth. I suppose some might
>>>> but I've never seen it happen. Fried rice is prepared with pre-cooked
>>>> white rice. I suppose some trendy restaurants might use brown rice but
>>>> I've never seen it. There is jook, which is a popular soup made with
>>>> rice but it's always made cooked white rice. Asians are unabashedly
>>>> unoriginal when it comes to cooking rice.
>>>>
>>>> ---
>>>>
>>>> Some Asian places here do offer brown rice or even brown fried rice but
>>>> they are the Americanized places. Asians don't put salt or fat in the
>>>> rice either. My friend was horrified when I told her how I made
>>>> rice as
>>>> she only ever makes the Japanese style.
>>>
>>> Asians would be surprised to learn that some Westerners don't wash their
>>> rice before cooking. It's just not in my DNA to follow that practice.

>>
>> Thats because rice grown in the US is clean, imported rice is
>> disgustingly filthy with human and other animal excrement. I won't
>> buy imported rice. Asians are the most disgustingly filthy people on
>> this planet... the vast majority of Asians go from birth to grave
>> without ever bathing.
>>

>
> Man, I love this place!


I think Brooklyn hasn't set foot out of the US. Most Asians I know bathe
MORE than twice a day. My wife is absolutely OCD about cleanliness!

--

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"Julie Bove" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Ophelia" > wrote in message
> ...
>>
>>
>> "dsi1" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>
>>> Asians would be surprised to learn that some Westerners don't wash their
>>> rice before cooking. It's just not in my DNA to follow that practice.

>>
>> But washing the rice gets rid of that cloudy stuff with bits in ... yes?

>
> If it is in there. Not all rice has that and not all needs to be washed.


How do you know the difference? I don't, so I prefer to wash. Heck it
doesn't take hours!


--
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"John Kuthe" > wrote in message
...
> On Wednesday, February 10, 2016 at 11:42:10 AM UTC-6, Janet B wrote:
>> On Wed, 10 Feb 2016 09:34:36 -0600, Sqwertz >
>> wrote:
>>
>> >On Wed, 10 Feb 2016 07:57:36 -0500, Gary wrote:
>> >
>> >> Julie Bove wrote:
>> >>>
>> >>> I finally had a reason to try it. Have been not feeling well on and
>> >>> off for
>> >>> days and really didn't feel up to cooking just now but wanted soup.
>> >>> So I
>> >>> used this to make a chicken soup and yes, I used canned chicken as
>> >>> well.
>> >>> And the end result? Just exactly like it comes out when I cook the
>> >>> rice
>> >>> myself. I am happy!
>> >>
>> >> This is good news, Julie. You bought a case based on good reviews.
>> >> Good that you tried one before you might depend on it. Now you know
>> >> it's a good thing.
>> >
>> >It's still that nasty cultured wild rice. True wild rice is so much
>> >better than those skinny black mouse turds.
>> >
>> >http://www.mooselakewildrice.com/
>> >
>> >-sw

>>
>> "Cultured Wild Rice?" I wasn't able to find a good reference for
>> this. I see there are farmers? who intentionally grow wild rice in
>> swamp land they have developed. I don't think that's what you mean?
>> I'm hung up on the term cultured (like cultured pearls) vs.
>> cultivated. Explain more please.
>> Janet US

>
> Only Heirloom True Wild Rice, eh?
>
> John Kuthe...


From what I have read of the true wild rice, and there is more than one
brand... It is hand picked then parched which means it is heated over a
fire. This technique makes it cook more quickly. I have ordered some. We
shall see.

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"dsi1" > wrote in message
...
> On Friday, February 12, 2016 at 7:37:36 PM UTC-10, Julie Bove wrote:
>>
>> This is funny. I just got off of the phone with a friend who was married
>> to
>> a Japanese man who is no longer with us. She said the Japanese are
>> fastidious, especially when it comes to the kitchen.

>
> Yes they are and perhaps overly so. Wearing a facemask in public is
> socially acceptable and it's expected if one has a cold. I wish people
> would do that here.
>
> The idea of a guy too ignorant/lazy to wash rice before cooking it
> complaining about the cleanliness of others boggles the mind. I mean, you
> cannot make this stuff up!


Yes! Pretty much the only people we see here wearing masks outside of a
medical facility are Asians.

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"Ophelia" > wrote in message
...
>
>
> "Julie Bove" > wrote in message
> ...
>>
>> "Ophelia" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>>
>>>
>>> "dsi1" > wrote in message
>>> ...
>>>
>>>> Asians would be surprised to learn that some Westerners don't wash
>>>> their rice before cooking. It's just not in my DNA to follow that
>>>> practice.
>>>
>>> But washing the rice gets rid of that cloudy stuff with bits in ... yes?

>>
>> If it is in there. Not all rice has that and not all needs to be washed.

>
> How do you know the difference? I don't, so I prefer to wash. Heck it
> doesn't take hours!


Unless you are buying it in bulk, it should say on the package if it does
need to be washed. I got some brown Basmati at Costco a few years back.
Just barely used it up before it went bad. It said on the bag to wash it
and after I did, I could clearly see why. Had a lot of dust on it. My
preferred rice when I ate it was Texmati. It's very clean and does not need
to be washed. I cook Asian rice far less frequently as we tend not to eat
much Asian food. I never washed it and I never saw any stuff on it.

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"dsi1" > wrote in message
...
> On 2/12/2016 4:05 PM, Janet B wrote:
>> On Fri, 12 Feb 2016 15:36:44 -1000, dsi1 > wrote:
>> snip
>>>
>>> As far as fried rice is concerned, calling fried rice a pilaf is an
>>> insult to two great dishes. We're quite serious about fried rice over
>>> here. Kim chee fried rice is a most wonderful dish.
>>>
>>> http://www.bubbleworld.ca/resources/upload/DSC0043.jpg

>>
>> Just in case you think I said that fried rice was a pilaf, no, I did
>> not. Nor did I imply so.
>> Janet US
>>

>
> Let's face it, there's not many people that would boldly state that fried
> rice is a pilaf - even on a technicality. OTOH, I suppose technically, a
> rat is the same as a polar bear. Topologically speaking, of course.


lol I suppose ...

--
http://www.helpforheroes.org.uk/shop/



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On Friday, February 12, 2016 at 7:44:53 PM UTC-5, cshenk wrote:
> Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>
> >
> > "cshenk" > wrote in message
> > ...
> > > Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:
> > >
> > > >
> > >>"cshenk" > wrote in message
> > > > ...
> > >>> Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:
> > > > >
> > >>> >
> > > wrote in message
> > >>> > ...
> > >>>>> I like canned spanish rice.
> > >>> >
> > >>> > I bought some many years ago that was good. Can't remember the
> > >>> > brand or where I was living when I bought it. But the only kind
> > >>> > I can find now in a can isn't good.
> > > > >
> > >>> I have never noticed canned rice. Could be they don't sell it
> > >>> here. I do recall a rather nice small can at HEB in San Antonio
> > >>> Texas that was a premade 'spanish rice' seasonings. You added it
> > >>> to cooked rice.
> > > > >
> > >>> Fortunately for me I have a rice machine (small unit) so even if I
> > >>> don't feel like cooking, that one is easy. If I'm really lazy, I
> > >>> ask my daughter to make it (grin).
> > > >
> > > > I most likely bought it at the military commissary and as I'm sure
> > > > you know, they often sell things that you can't get elsewhere.
> > > > But how can you do Spanish rice in a rice machine? How would you
> > > > brown it?
> > >
> > > Smile, you make the rice then brown it if that particular recipe
> > > calls for browning at all. Fact is there are so many varieties of
> > > 'spanish or mexican rice' that it's very possible you are used to
> > > making it almost rice-a-roni ish where you brown the rice in butter
> > > then add the water and seasonings?

> >
> > That makes no sense. The rice should be browned before cooking for
> > Spanish rice. And I don't use butter but olive oil. But yes, that
> > is how it should be done.

>
> Julie, just because you havent seen it, doesn't make it so. You are
> doing pilaf. I am not. Nuff said?
>
> > > Others use fresh cooked rice which is then lightly stir fried in
> > > butter and olive oil then added spices and tomatoes are added.

> >
> > Have never ever seen such a recipe. Never.

>
> Want to see one? Or want to deny they exist? Choice is yours.
>
>
> > > A simple sort that is soft and works well is to make a batch of rice
> > > (you'd want about 3 cups yield at least) then add Ro-Tel (or a store
> > > knock off) and heat then serve. Some heat the ro-tel separate in
> > > the microwave then use it to top the rice. While not haute
> > > cuisine, it's simple and fast and in your house may be more
> > > effective since people could chose to top the rice with that or
> > > something else.

> >
> > No thanks. That is not how I make it at all. Actually I don't make
> > it at all now since I was the only one who really liked it. And I
> > can't have rice now. For me, Spanish rice has meat in it and is a
> > meal. Mexican rice shouldn't have any chunks of stuff in it. Unless
> > of course you are doing something like cilantro lime rice.

>
> ???? Wierd. I've not seen a spanish rice with meat in it unless it was
> highly americanized or trying to pretend to be a mix of asian shrimp
> fried rice with tomato topping..
> Carol


Just because it's highly Americanized doesn't mean we don't call it
Spanish rice. Spanish rice with hamburger in it is a Midwestern
classic. Here's the recipe from the 1979 edition of
the Better Crocker Cookbook:

Spanish Rice

1/2 pound bacon (about 10 slices), cut into 3/4-inch pieces
1/2 pound hamburger
1 medium onion, chipped (about 1/2 cup)
2 cups water
1 cup uncooked regular rice (presume they mean long-grain)
2/3 cup chopped green pepper
1 can (16 ounces) stewed tomatoes
1 teaspoon chili powder
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano leaves
1 1/4 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon pepper

Fry bacon until crisp; drain on paper towels. Cook and stir hamburger and onion in 10-inch skillet until hamburger is light brown; drain. Stir in bacon and remaining ingredients. Heat to boiling; reduce heat. Cover and simmer, stirring occasionally, until rice is tender, about 30 minutes. (Add small amount water during cooking if necessary.)
6 servings.

Yikes. Half an hour for rice. Can you say "exploded mush"?

Cindy Hamilton
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On Friday, February 12, 2016 at 8:42:02 PM UTC-5, dsi1 wrote:

> Rice with hot tea poured on it is a popular thing to eat with the old
> folks. I've never gotten a taste for it - it's a pretty old-school thing
> to do. My guess is they'll still do that in Japan.


I must be an elderly Asian. I don't regularly pour hot tea over rice,
but I've done it. It was pretty good.

There used to be a Chinese restaurant nearby; we'd go there and get
a family-sized bowl of hot and sour soup, two servings of rice, and
tea. (I believe the owners thought we were crazy, but they seemed
to like us.) I'd occasionally pour some hot tea into my rice.
Sadly, the place closed suddenly and we've never been able to find
out if they re-opened elsewhere.

Cindy
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On Sat, 13 Feb 2016 03:38:18 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
> wrote:
snip
>
>Just because it's highly Americanized doesn't mean we don't call it
>Spanish rice. Spanish rice with hamburger in it is a Midwestern
>classic. Here's the recipe from the 1979 edition of
>the Better Crocker Cookbook:
>
>Spanish Rice
>
>1/2 pound bacon (about 10 slices), cut into 3/4-inch pieces
>1/2 pound hamburger
>1 medium onion, chipped (about 1/2 cup)
>2 cups water
>1 cup uncooked regular rice (presume they mean long-grain)
>2/3 cup chopped green pepper
>1 can (16 ounces) stewed tomatoes
>1 teaspoon chili powder
>1/2 teaspoon dried oregano leaves
>1 1/4 teaspoon salt
>1/8 teaspoon pepper
>
>Fry bacon until crisp; drain on paper towels. Cook and stir hamburger and onion in 10-inch skillet until hamburger is light brown; drain. Stir in bacon and remaining ingredients. Heat to boiling; reduce heat. Cover and simmer, stirring occasionally, until rice is tender, about 30 minutes. (Add small amount water during cooking if necessary.)
>6 servings.
>
>Yikes. Half an hour for rice. Can you say "exploded mush"?
>
>Cindy Hamilton


That's a 'one-dish meal' or a casserole or a hot dish. (is hot dish
one or two words?)
Mine is called Western Hash and is pretty much the same as above
except the seasonings are different.
All the brand names for tomatoes, salsa, rice etc., have a recipe on
the container back. Some use chicken, chorizo, pork sausage.
Janet US
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In article >, gravesend10
@verizon.net says...

Asians are the most disgustingly filthy people on
> this planet... the vast majority of Asians go from birth to grave
> without ever bathing.


Apparently you don't know that the biggest religion in Asia is Islam;
Muslims pray five times every day, and every time before they pray, they
wash their face neck hands and feet.

Janet UK



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On Saturday, February 13, 2016 at 1:38:25 AM UTC-10, Cindy Hamilton wrote:
> On Friday, February 12, 2016 at 7:44:53 PM UTC-5, cshenk wrote:
> > Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:
> >
> > >
> > > "cshenk" > wrote in message
> > > ...
> > > > Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:
> > > >
> > > > >
> > > >>"cshenk" > wrote in message
> > > > > ...
> > > >>> Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:
> > > > > >
> > > >>> >
> > > > wrote in message
> > > >>> > ...
> > > >>>>> I like canned spanish rice.
> > > >>> >
> > > >>> > I bought some many years ago that was good. Can't remember the
> > > >>> > brand or where I was living when I bought it. But the only kind
> > > >>> > I can find now in a can isn't good.
> > > > > >
> > > >>> I have never noticed canned rice. Could be they don't sell it
> > > >>> here. I do recall a rather nice small can at HEB in San Antonio
> > > >>> Texas that was a premade 'spanish rice' seasonings. You added it
> > > >>> to cooked rice.
> > > > > >
> > > >>> Fortunately for me I have a rice machine (small unit) so even if I
> > > >>> don't feel like cooking, that one is easy. If I'm really lazy, I
> > > >>> ask my daughter to make it (grin).
> > > > >
> > > > > I most likely bought it at the military commissary and as I'm sure
> > > > > you know, they often sell things that you can't get elsewhere.
> > > > > But how can you do Spanish rice in a rice machine? How would you
> > > > > brown it?
> > > >
> > > > Smile, you make the rice then brown it if that particular recipe
> > > > calls for browning at all. Fact is there are so many varieties of
> > > > 'spanish or mexican rice' that it's very possible you are used to
> > > > making it almost rice-a-roni ish where you brown the rice in butter
> > > > then add the water and seasonings?
> > >
> > > That makes no sense. The rice should be browned before cooking for
> > > Spanish rice. And I don't use butter but olive oil. But yes, that
> > > is how it should be done.

> >
> > Julie, just because you havent seen it, doesn't make it so. You are
> > doing pilaf. I am not. Nuff said?
> >
> > > > Others use fresh cooked rice which is then lightly stir fried in
> > > > butter and olive oil then added spices and tomatoes are added.
> > >
> > > Have never ever seen such a recipe. Never.

> >
> > Want to see one? Or want to deny they exist? Choice is yours.
> >
> >
> > > > A simple sort that is soft and works well is to make a batch of rice
> > > > (you'd want about 3 cups yield at least) then add Ro-Tel (or a store
> > > > knock off) and heat then serve. Some heat the ro-tel separate in
> > > > the microwave then use it to top the rice. While not haute
> > > > cuisine, it's simple and fast and in your house may be more
> > > > effective since people could chose to top the rice with that or
> > > > something else.
> > >
> > > No thanks. That is not how I make it at all. Actually I don't make
> > > it at all now since I was the only one who really liked it. And I
> > > can't have rice now. For me, Spanish rice has meat in it and is a
> > > meal. Mexican rice shouldn't have any chunks of stuff in it. Unless
> > > of course you are doing something like cilantro lime rice.

> >
> > ???? Wierd. I've not seen a spanish rice with meat in it unless it was
> > highly americanized or trying to pretend to be a mix of asian shrimp
> > fried rice with tomato topping..
> > Carol

>
> Just because it's highly Americanized doesn't mean we don't call it
> Spanish rice. Spanish rice with hamburger in it is a Midwestern
> classic. Here's the recipe from the 1979 edition of
> the Better Crocker Cookbook:
>
> Spanish Rice
>
> 1/2 pound bacon (about 10 slices), cut into 3/4-inch pieces
> 1/2 pound hamburger
> 1 medium onion, chipped (about 1/2 cup)
> 2 cups water
> 1 cup uncooked regular rice (presume they mean long-grain)
> 2/3 cup chopped green pepper
> 1 can (16 ounces) stewed tomatoes
> 1 teaspoon chili powder
> 1/2 teaspoon dried oregano leaves
> 1 1/4 teaspoon salt
> 1/8 teaspoon pepper
>
> Fry bacon until crisp; drain on paper towels. Cook and stir hamburger and onion in 10-inch skillet until hamburger is light brown; drain. Stir in bacon and remaining ingredients. Heat to boiling; reduce heat. Cover and simmer, stirring occasionally, until rice is tender, about 30 minutes. (Add small amount water during cooking if necessary.)
> 6 servings.
>
> Yikes. Half an hour for rice. Can you say "exploded mush"?
>
> Cindy Hamilton


I wish I could make Spanish rice. I always fail.

Yesterday I got a bento from a client. It had maki sushi and tapioca pudding with fruit and nata de coco. The sushi had what appeared to be Vienna sausage in it. Ho ho ho, it tasted pretty good though. I can't say why. Damn exotic!


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On Saturday, February 13, 2016 at 1:42:10 AM UTC-10, Cindy Hamilton wrote:
> On Friday, February 12, 2016 at 8:42:02 PM UTC-5, dsi1 wrote:
>
> > Rice with hot tea poured on it is a popular thing to eat with the old
> > folks. I've never gotten a taste for it - it's a pretty old-school thing
> > to do. My guess is they'll still do that in Japan.

>
> I must be an elderly Asian. I don't regularly pour hot tea over rice,
> but I've done it. It was pretty good.
>
> There used to be a Chinese restaurant nearby; we'd go there and get
> a family-sized bowl of hot and sour soup, two servings of rice, and
> tea. (I believe the owners thought we were crazy, but they seemed
> to like us.) I'd occasionally pour some hot tea into my rice.
> Sadly, the place closed suddenly and we've never been able to find
> out if they re-opened elsewhere.
>
> Cindy


Most peculiar. That's not something most people would spontaneously do. Usually, people will learn this from their parents.
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"Janet B" > wrote in message
...
> On Sat, 13 Feb 2016 03:38:18 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
> > wrote:
> snip
>>
>>Just because it's highly Americanized doesn't mean we don't call it
>>Spanish rice. Spanish rice with hamburger in it is a Midwestern
>>classic. Here's the recipe from the 1979 edition of
>>the Better Crocker Cookbook:
>>
>>Spanish Rice
>>
>>1/2 pound bacon (about 10 slices), cut into 3/4-inch pieces
>>1/2 pound hamburger
>>1 medium onion, chipped (about 1/2 cup)
>>2 cups water
>>1 cup uncooked regular rice (presume they mean long-grain)
>>2/3 cup chopped green pepper
>>1 can (16 ounces) stewed tomatoes
>>1 teaspoon chili powder
>>1/2 teaspoon dried oregano leaves
>>1 1/4 teaspoon salt
>>1/8 teaspoon pepper
>>
>>Fry bacon until crisp; drain on paper towels. Cook and stir hamburger and
>>onion in 10-inch skillet until hamburger is light brown; drain. Stir in
>>bacon and remaining ingredients. Heat to boiling; reduce heat. Cover and
>>simmer, stirring occasionally, until rice is tender, about 30 minutes.
>>(Add small amount water during cooking if necessary.)
>>6 servings.
>>
>>Yikes. Half an hour for rice. Can you say "exploded mush"?
>>
>>Cindy Hamilton

>
> That's a 'one-dish meal' or a casserole or a hot dish. (is hot dish
> one or two words?)
> Mine is called Western Hash and is pretty much the same as above
> except the seasonings are different.
> All the brand names for tomatoes, salsa, rice etc., have a recipe on
> the container back. Some use chicken, chorizo, pork sausage.
> Janet US


Yep. I don't use an actual recipe and sometimes I would put beans or corn
in mine. About the only thing I would buy specifically for this dish is the
ground beef. Otherwise it was a good way to use things up.

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On 2/12/2016 8:50 PM, Brooklyn1 wrote:
> Asians are the most disgustingly filthy people on
> this planet... the vast majority of Asians go from birth to grave
> without ever bathing.


When did you live in any part of Asia? The people in Thailand were
scrupulously clean. Bathing is practically a ritual.

Jill
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On 2/12/2016 3:09 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
> I once made a Greek rice and spinach dish where not only was the rice
> browned in fat to start with but it was made in a skillet with no lid.
> You added broth to it as it cooked, stirring all the while. I only made
> it once as nobody else liked it. I did. But it wasn't called pilaf.


Sounds like you're talking about risotto, which isn't Greek.

Jill
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"jmcquown" > wrote in message
...
> On 2/12/2016 3:09 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
>> I once made a Greek rice and spinach dish where not only was the rice
>> browned in fat to start with but it was made in a skillet with no lid.
>> You added broth to it as it cooked, stirring all the while. I only made
>> it once as nobody else liked it. I did. But it wasn't called pilaf.

>
> Sounds like you're talking about risotto, which isn't Greek.


No. Spanakoriso. It is Greek.



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On 2/15/2016 11:15 AM, Julie Bove wrote:
>
> "jmcquown" > wrote in message
> ...
>>[...]
>>
>> Sounds like you're talking about risotto, which isn't Greek.

>
> No. Spanakoriso. It is Greek.


Spanakorizo (A Greek Spinach ***Risotto***)
http://www.food.com/recipe/spanakori...-risotto-59468
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On 2/12/2016 3:06 PM, Julie Bove wrote:

> "Bolt Lits AG" > wrote in message
> ...
>> On 2/12/2016 12:11 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
>>
>>> Asians don't ever cook rice in any kind of broth. I suppose some might
>>> but I've never seen it happen.

>>
>> How far does one plumb to find the depths of your ignorance, anyway?
>>
>> "A breakfast and lunch staple in many Asian countries and a mainstay at
>> the dim sum hall, congee is rice and water (or broth) cooked down into
>> a thick porridge."
>>
>> http://www.seriouseats.com/2014/09/d...ng-congee.html
>>
>>
>> No wonder you get the kind of abuse heaped on you that you do here.
>>
>> Please consider quitting entirely.

>
>
> I don't think I wrote that.


Your post made it look like you did - no quoting indent.

Regardless, still incorrect. I've had plenty of chicken-broth and fish-
broth congee (aka "joke").
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On 2/12/2016 2:00 PM, dsi1 wrote:

> On 2/12/2016 11:46 AM, Bolt Lits AG wrote:
>> On 2/12/2016 11:12 AM, dsi1 wrote:
>>
>>> Asians don't ever cook rice in any kind of broth. I suppose some might
>>> but I've never seen it happen. Fried rice is prepared with pre-cooked
>>> white rice. I suppose some trendy restaurants might use brown rice but
>>> I've never seen it. There is jook, which is a popular soup made with
>>> rice but it's always made cooked white rice. Asians are unabashedly
>>> unoriginal when it comes to cooking rice.

>>
>> Wrong.
>>
>> http://www.seriouseats.com/2014/09/d...ng-congee.html
>>
>>
>>

>
> I've made jook before. Did you even bother to read my post or your link?
>
> I thought so.


My bad, yeah ... this thread is so infested with the BoveStoopit stuff
that I skipped over it. C'est la vie.
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On 2/15/2016 12:10 PM, Bolt Lits AG wrote:
> On 2/12/2016 2:00 PM, dsi1 wrote:
>
>> On 2/12/2016 11:46 AM, Bolt Lits AG wrote:
>>> On 2/12/2016 11:12 AM, dsi1 wrote:
>>>
>>>> Asians don't ever cook rice in any kind of broth. I suppose some might
>>>> but I've never seen it happen. Fried rice is prepared with pre-cooked
>>>> white rice. I suppose some trendy restaurants might use brown rice but
>>>> I've never seen it. There is jook, which is a popular soup made with
>>>> rice but it's always made cooked white rice. Asians are unabashedly
>>>> unoriginal when it comes to cooking rice.
>>>
>>> Wrong.
>>>
>>> http://www.seriouseats.com/2014/09/d...ng-congee.html
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>

>>
>> I've made jook before. Did you even bother to read my post or your link?
>>
>> I thought so.

>
> My bad, yeah ... this thread is so infested with the BoveStoopit stuff
> that I skipped over it. C'est la vie.


Thanks for fessin' up to it.
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The canned Spanish rice I get is from Mexico. I think it's La Preferida or something like that.


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"Bolt Lits AG" > wrote in message
...
> On 2/15/2016 11:15 AM, Julie Bove wrote:
>>
>> "jmcquown" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>>[...]
>>>
>>> Sounds like you're talking about risotto, which isn't Greek.

>>
>> No. Spanakoriso. It is Greek.

>
> Spanakorizo (A Greek Spinach ***Risotto***)
> http://www.food.com/recipe/spanakori...-risotto-59468


Okay.

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> wrote in message
...
> The canned Spanish rice I get is from Mexico. I think it's La Preferida or
> something like that.


That's the one we didn't like. Weird texture.

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On Monday, February 15, 2016 at 6:37:42 PM UTC-7, Julie Bove wrote:
> > wrote in message
> ...
> > The canned Spanish rice I get is from Mexico. I think it's La Preferida or
> > something like that.

>
> That's the one we didn't like. Weird texture.


I can't even imagine why anyone would buy canned rice let alone eat it.
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"Roy" > wrote in message
...
> On Monday, February 15, 2016 at 6:37:42 PM UTC-7, Julie Bove wrote:
>> > wrote in message
>> ...
>> > The canned Spanish rice I get is from Mexico. I think it's La Preferida
>> > or
>> > something like that.

>>
>> That's the one we didn't like. Weird texture.

>
> I can't even imagine why anyone would buy canned rice let alone eat it.


It's a near instant meal. We used to get some that was very good. The wild
rice is very good.

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On 2/16/2016 11:07 AM, Julie Bove wrote:
>
> "Roy" > wrote in message
> ...
>> On Monday, February 15, 2016 at 6:37:42 PM UTC-7, Julie Bove wrote:
>>> > wrote in message
>>> ...
>>> > The canned Spanish rice I get is from Mexico. I think it's La
>>> Preferida > or
>>> > something like that.
>>>
>>> That's the one we didn't like. Weird texture.

>>
>> I can't even imagine why anyone would buy canned rice let alone eat it.

>
> It's a near instant meal. We used to get some that was very good. The
> wild rice is very good.


Judging the worthiness of food without ever seeing or tasting runs
rampant here. I've never seen the stuff myself. It sounds pretty wild. I
have seen white and brown rice in bowls but never canned. If I see this
stuff in the stores, I'll get it - unless the price is too dear. Of
course, I'd make kim chee fried rice with it.


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On 2016-02-16 12:35 PM, Roy wrote:
> On Monday, February 15, 2016 at 6:37:42 PM UTC-7, Julie Bove wrote:


>> That's the one we didn't like. Weird texture.

>
> I can't even imagine why anyone would buy canned rice let alone eat it.
>



There are lot of things about the world of Bove that most of us cannot
imagine.
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On Friday, February 12, 2016 at 5:03:29 PM UTC-6, Julie Bove wrote:
> "dsi1" > wrote in message
> ...
> > On 2/12/2016 10:09 AM, Julie Bove wrote:
> >>
> >> "Janet B" > wrote in message
> >> ...
> >>> On Fri, 12 Feb 2016 03:45:35 -0800, "Julie Bove"
> >>> > wrote:
> >>>
> >>>>
> >>>> "Janet B" > wrote in message
> >>>> ...
> >>>>> On Thu, 11 Feb 2016 19:51:40 -0600, "cshenk" > wrote:
> >>>>>
> >>>>>> Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>>>
> >>>>>>> "cshenk" > wrote in message
> >>>>>>> ...
> >>>>>>> > Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:
> >>>>>>> >
> >>>>>>> > >
> >>>>>>> > wrote in message
> >>>>>>> > > ...
> >>>>>>> >>> I like canned spanish rice.
> >>>>>>> > >
> >>>>>>> > > I bought some many years ago that was good. Can't remember the
> >>>>>>> > > brand or where I was living when I bought it. But the only kind
> >>>>>>> > > I can find now in a can isn't good.
> >>>>>>> >
> >>>>>>> > I have never noticed canned rice. Could be they don't sell it
> >>>>>>> > here. I *do* recall a rather nice small can at HEB in San Antonio
> >>>>>>> > Texas that was a premade 'spanish rice' seasonings. You added it
> >>>>>>> > to cooked rice.
> >>>>>>> >
> >>>>>>> > Fortunately for me I have a rice machine (small unit) so even if I
> >>>>>>> > don't feel like cooking, that one is easy. If I'm really lazy, I
> >>>>>>> > ask my daughter to make it (grin).
> >>>>>>>
> >>>>>>> I most likely bought it at the military commissary and as I'm sure
> >>>>>>> you know, they often sell things that you can't get elsewhere. But
> >>>>>>> how can you do Spanish rice in a rice machine? How would you brown
> >>>>>>> it?
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>> Smile, you make the rice then brown it if that particular recipe
> >>>>>> calls
> >>>>>> for browning at all. Fact is there are so many varieties of 'spanish
> >>>>>> or mexican rice' that it's very possible you are used to making it
> >>>>>> almost rice-a-roni ish where you brown the rice in butter then add
> >>>>>> the
> >>>>>> water and seasonings?
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>> Others use fresh cooked rice which is then lightly stir fried in
> >>>>>> butter
> >>>>>> and olive oil then added spices and tomatoes are added.
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>> A simple sort that is soft and works well is to make a batch of rice
> >>>>>> (you'd want about 3 cups yield at least) then add Ro-Tel (or a store
> >>>>>> knock off) and heat then serve. Some heat the ro-tel separate in the
> >>>>>> microwave then use it to top the rice. While not haute cuisine, it's
> >>>>>> simple and fast and in your house may be more effective since people
> >>>>>> could chose to top the rice with that or something else.
> >>>>>
> >>>>> The dish is a pilaf and is thousands of years old. Pilaf exists every
> >>>>> where in the world and is made according to local traditions Generally
> >>>>> the basics are rice is 'browned' in a fat, cooked in a broth and
> >>>>> meats/vegetables are added. Rice a Roni, a rice and pasta dish is
> >>>>> still a pilaf.
> >>>>> Janet US
> >>>>
> >>>> Not according to this:
> >>>>
> >>>> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pilaf
> >>>
> >>> It is the style of the dish as opposed to cooking the rice in water
> >>> and eating plain or cooking the rice and then adding to other
> >>> ingredients to the rice. The rice, broth and other ingredients are
> >>> cooked together. I investigated pilaf years and years ago when I
> >>> noticed the likeness of several recipes
> >>> Carol's cooked rice with Rotel added to the cooked rice is not pilaf.
> >>> Arroz con Pollo is pilaf because the broth, chicken and vegetables are
> >>> cooked together.. As far as I can tell, Mexican/Spanish rice is pilaf
> >>> I very carefully said 'made according to local traditions' and
> >>> 'generally the basics'. There are huge variations in the dish. Read
> >>> some recipes. Quite a few include pasta and some even include
> >>> potatoes.
> >>> Sorry, I didn't want to be "teachy", I'm just fascinated by how few
> >>> actual different 'recipes' there are. There are base methods that
> >>> have been adjusted to reflect available food stuffs, climate,
> >>> religions.
> >>> Photos of huge differences:
> >>> http://tinyurl.com/gvfmclx
> >>> Janet US
> >>
> >> But you said that the rice was browned in fat. I suppose some recipes
> >> might be but my mom always made hers in the oven and it wasn't browned
> >> in fat. I did look it up and didn't see any that was browned in fat
> >> either. I once made a Greek rice and spinach dish where not only was
> >> the rice browned in fat to start with but it was made in a skillet with
> >> no lid. You added broth to it as it cooked, stirring all the while. I
> >> only made it once as nobody else liked it. I did. But it wasn't
> >> called pilaf.

> >
> > I have fried raw rice in a pan when making Spanish rice. I was never able
> > to make an acceptable Spanish rice though. Mostly, people learn this odd
> > technique from making that San Francisco treat - Rice-A-Roni.

>
> I grew up eating that stuff and it was no treat! Then I remember getting my
> first apartment and time and time again buying their Spanish or Mexican or
> whatever they called it rice when it was on sale. It was awful. But I kept
> trying because people kept telling me that I must be making it wrong. No.
> It's just awful and not a thing like the real thing.
>
> Oddly enough, my husband who is not a fan of rice or pasta will eat
> Rice-A-Roni and likes it.


Your husband is White trash. That's why he was able to father your whale of
a daughter, who had a muffin top at 13. Perhaps your myriad of health problems
are due to her poisoning you. She has every right to want you dead, since you
allowed her to become disgustingly fat, which has ruined her life. She didn't
have much of a chance anyway, considering her genetics, but you sealed the deal.

--Bryan
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On 2/16/2016 5:42 PM, Dave Smith wrote:
> On 2016-02-16 12:35 PM, Roy wrote:
>> On Monday, February 15, 2016 at 6:37:42 PM UTC-7, Julie Bove wrote:

>
>>> That's the one we didn't like. Weird texture.

>>
>> I can't even imagine why anyone would buy canned rice let alone eat it.
>>

>
>
> There are lot of things about the world of Bove that most of us cannot
> imagine.


I think she just enjoys opening cans.

Jill
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"dsi1" > wrote in message
...
> On 2/16/2016 11:07 AM, Julie Bove wrote:
>>
>> "Roy" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>> On Monday, February 15, 2016 at 6:37:42 PM UTC-7, Julie Bove wrote:
>>>> > wrote in message
>>>> ...
>>>> > The canned Spanish rice I get is from Mexico. I think it's La
>>>> Preferida > or
>>>> > something like that.
>>>>
>>>> That's the one we didn't like. Weird texture.
>>>
>>> I can't even imagine why anyone would buy canned rice let alone eat it.

>>
>> It's a near instant meal. We used to get some that was very good. The
>> wild rice is very good.

>
> Judging the worthiness of food without ever seeing or tasting runs rampant
> here. I've never seen the stuff myself. It sounds pretty wild. I have seen
> white and brown rice in bowls but never canned. If I see this stuff in the
> stores, I'll get it - unless the price is too dear. Of course, I'd make
> kim chee fried rice with it.


You can buy it in pouches. I used to keep it for times when I was so ill
that I didn't feel up to cooking even rice. But never again. The last
pouch I opened came out smelly and black. Seems too easy for those pouches
to get a pin prick type hole that you wouldn't notice but it is enough to
make the contents go moldy. My mom used to buy the little cups for my dad.
I have also seen frozen rice.

But around here, Teriyaki shops are as common as drive through coffee
places. So if I am out and for some reason need cooked hot rice, I will go
there.

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"Dave Smith" > wrote in message
...
> On 2016-02-16 12:35 PM, Roy wrote:
>> On Monday, February 15, 2016 at 6:37:42 PM UTC-7, Julie Bove wrote:

>
>>> That's the one we didn't like. Weird texture.

>>
>> I can't even imagine why anyone would buy canned rice let alone eat it.
>>

>
>
> There are lot of things about the world of Bove that most of us cannot
> imagine.


Good! Let's just keep it that way.

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