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"Janet B" > wrote in message
...
> On Thu, 11 Feb 2016 19:38:20 -0600, "cshenk" > wrote:
>
>>Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>>
>>>
>>> "jmcquown" > wrote in message
>>> ...
>>> > On 2/10/2016 3:54 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
>>> > >
>>> > > > It's still that nasty cultured wild rice. True wild rice is so
>>> > > > much better than those skinny black mouse turds.
>>> > > >
>>> > > > http://www.mooselakewildrice.com/
>>> > > >
>>> > > > -sw
>>> > >
>>> > > How is it better?
>>> >
>>> > It's hand-harvested wild grass seeds, grows wild in lakes and ponds
>>> > in the Northern US and Canada.
>>> >
>>> > IMHO it tastes better and has a really nice nutty texture. I doubt
>>> > you'd appreciate the difference.
>>> >
>>> > Jill
>>>
>>> Oops. Sent blank reply. I think I may have had some in the past. I
>>> do remember getting some brown stuff but can't remember where I got
>>> it. I also remember tossing out half of the packet because it just
>>> didn't have much flavor. As for food textures, I am big into that.

>>
>>Don't be too suprised if the taste of brown doesnt appeal. Some love
>>it (I like it for a variation) but some dislike it (Don and Charlotte).
>>It's specifically the nutty flavor they feel off putting in a rice.
>>
>>The texture of brown didnt appeal to me that much but then I am so used
>>to medium grain sticky, that singlit grain types do not appeal to me.

>
> This is different. This isn't rice as you are thinking. Although
> called rice it is a grass and is much different than traditional rice.
> Janet US


Yes. I am very familiar with it because as I said, I used to buy the
Sheltons brand chicken and wild rice soup. It was actually very good but it
didn't have much broth in it so to me, it was a stretch to call it soup. At
that point in time, it was one of the few gluten free and dairy free canned
soups I could buy. There are plenty more on the market now as there is a
big demand for them. Sadly, Sheltons quit making it.

I happen to like wild rice and once in a while if my husband is hungry
enough, he will eat a casserole made with it, provided that I add enough
meat and veggies so that he doesn't notice the wild rice. Otherwise, he
doesn't like it.

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On Fri, 12 Feb 2016 03:45:35 -0800, "Julie Bove"
> wrote:

>
>"Janet B" > wrote in message
.. .
>> On Thu, 11 Feb 2016 19:51:40 -0600, "cshenk" > wrote:
>>
>>>Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>>>
>>>>
>>>> "cshenk" > wrote in message
>>>> ...
>>>> > Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>>>> >
>>>> > >
>>>> > wrote in message
>>>> > > ...
>>>> >>> I like canned spanish rice.
>>>> > >
>>>> > > I bought some many years ago that was good. Can't remember the
>>>> > > brand or where I was living when I bought it. But the only kind
>>>> > > I can find now in a can isn't good.
>>>> >
>>>> > I have never noticed canned rice. Could be they don't sell it
>>>> > here. I *do* recall a rather nice small can at HEB in San Antonio
>>>> > Texas that was a premade 'spanish rice' seasonings. You added it
>>>> > to cooked rice.
>>>> >
>>>> > Fortunately for me I have a rice machine (small unit) so even if I
>>>> > don't feel like cooking, that one is easy. If I'm really lazy, I
>>>> > ask my daughter to make it (grin).
>>>>
>>>> I most likely bought it at the military commissary and as I'm sure
>>>> you know, they often sell things that you can't get elsewhere. But
>>>> how can you do Spanish rice in a rice machine? How would you brown
>>>> it?
>>>
>>>Smile, you make the rice then brown it if that particular recipe calls
>>>for browning at all. Fact is there are so many varieties of 'spanish
>>>or mexican rice' that it's very possible you are used to making it
>>>almost rice-a-roni ish where you brown the rice in butter then add the
>>>water and seasonings?
>>>
>>>Others use fresh cooked rice which is then lightly stir fried in butter
>>>and olive oil then added spices and tomatoes are added.
>>>
>>>A simple sort that is soft and works well is to make a batch of rice
>>>(you'd want about 3 cups yield at least) then add Ro-Tel (or a store
>>>knock off) and heat then serve. Some heat the ro-tel separate in the
>>>microwave then use it to top the rice. While not haute cuisine, it's
>>>simple and fast and in your house may be more effective since people
>>>could chose to top the rice with that or something else.

>>
>> The dish is a pilaf and is thousands of years old. Pilaf exists every
>> where in the world and is made according to local traditions Generally
>> the basics are rice is 'browned' in a fat, cooked in a broth and
>> meats/vegetables are added. Rice a Roni, a rice and pasta dish is
>> still a pilaf.
>> Janet US

>
>Not according to this:
>
>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pilaf


It is the style of the dish as opposed to cooking the rice in water
and eating plain or cooking the rice and then adding to other
ingredients to the rice. The rice, broth and other ingredients are
cooked together. I investigated pilaf years and years ago when I
noticed the likeness of several recipes
Carol's cooked rice with Rotel added to the cooked rice is not pilaf.
Arroz con Pollo is pilaf because the broth, chicken and vegetables are
cooked together.. As far as I can tell, Mexican/Spanish rice is pilaf
I very carefully said 'made according to local traditions' and
'generally the basics'. There are huge variations in the dish. Read
some recipes. Quite a few include pasta and some even include
potatoes.
Sorry, I didn't want to be "teachy", I'm just fascinated by how few
actual different 'recipes' there are. There are base methods that
have been adjusted to reflect available food stuffs, climate,
religions.
Photos of huge differences:
http://tinyurl.com/gvfmclx
Janet US
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In article >, says...
>
> "Roy" > wrote in message
> ...
> > On Thursday, February 11, 2016 at 3:27:22 AM UTC-7, Julie Bove wrote:
> >> "Sqwertz" > wrote in message
> >> ...
> >> > On Wed, 10 Feb 2016 20:14:33 -0800, Julie Bove wrote:
> >> >
> >> >> "Sqwertz" > wrote in message
> >> >> ...
> >> >>> On Wed, 10 Feb 2016 12:58:54 -0800, Julie Bove wrote:
> >> >>>
> >> >>>> Thankfully I have no near fatal allergies of any kind. What I have
> >> >>>> are
> >> >>>> food
> >> >>>> intolerances and they can change. I expect them to after having my
> >> >>>> thyroid
> >> >>>> out.
> >> >>>
> >> >>> Of course there is absolutely zero credible medical precedence for
> >> >>> developing food intolerances or allerfies after a thyroidectomy, but
> >> >>> you just KNOW it will happen. You will MAKE it happen or die trying.
> >> >>
> >> >> Not developing. But food intolerances can and do change.
> >> >
> >> > They can develop over long periods of time, and they'll usually stay.
> >> > They don't flip flop back and forth depending on your latest hair
> >> > follicle tests.
> >>
> >> Actually they can. That is why some people have to do the rotation diet.

> >
> > But "those" people believe all of the BS those QUACKS on those QUACK sites
> > put out for the vulnerable hypochondriacs who need a new food fad fix to
> > juice up their dull, unrewarding lives.
> > Poor pathetic souls.
> > =====

>
> My Endo. isn't a quack.


You said that about your quack hair analyst in England.

Janet UK
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On Friday, February 12, 2016 at 4:50:41 AM UTC-7, Julie Bove wrote:
> "cshenk" > wrote in message
> ...
> > jmcquown wrote in rec.food.cooking:
> >
> >> On 2/11/2016 8:38 PM, cshenk wrote:
> >> > Don't be too suprised if the taste of brown doesnt appeal. Some
> >> > love it (I like it for a variation) but some dislike it (Don and
> >> > Charlotte). It's specifically the nutty flavor they feel off
> >> > putting in a rice.
> >>
> >> Don't forget, wild rice is not rice. It's grass seed. I love it but
> >> I don't want to eat it all the time. Definitely not enough to think
> >> about buying a case of canned wild rice.
> >>
> >> Jill

> >
> > I didnt. I speifically was talking Brown rice. Julie shifted to
> > address brown rice.

>
> Nonsense. We were talking about wild rice. I can't eat regular rice so I
> now eat wild rice. What I bought was the black, cultivated and some here
> told me that the brown *wild* rice is better tasting.


"I can't eat regular rice so I now eat wild rice."...hmmm, I was led to believe that rice is pretty innocuous when it comes to food intolerance's. Most people can digest it with no problems.
=====
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On 2016-02-12 11:33 AM, Roy wrote:
> On Friday, February 12, 2016 at 4:50:41 AM UTC-7, Julie Bove wrote:


>>> I didnt. I speifically was talking Brown rice. Julie shifted
>>> to address brown rice.

>>
>> Nonsense. We were talking about wild rice. I can't eat regular
>> rice so I now eat wild rice. What I bought was the black,
>> cultivated and some here told me that the brown *wild* rice is
>> better tasting.

>
> "I can't eat regular rice so I now eat wild rice."...hmmm, I was led
> to believe that rice is pretty innocuous when it comes to food
> intolerance's. Most people can digest it with no problems. =====



Yep. Most normal people have no problem eating rice. She is definitely
not normal. Don't worry. In a little while she will be posting about
cooking and eating rice and deny that she ever said she could not eat it.


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On Thu, 11 Feb 2016 20:30:16 -0700, Janet B >
wrote:

>On Thu, 11 Feb 2016 19:38:20 -0600, "cshenk" > wrote:
>
>>Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>>
>>>
>>> "jmcquown" > wrote in message
>>> ...
>>> > On 2/10/2016 3:54 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
>>> > >
>>> > > > It's still that nasty cultured wild rice. True wild rice is so
>>> > > > much better than those skinny black mouse turds.
>>> > > >
>>> > > > http://www.mooselakewildrice.com/
>>> > > >
>>> > > > -sw
>>> > >
>>> > > How is it better?
>>> >
>>> > It's hand-harvested wild grass seeds, grows wild in lakes and ponds
>>> > in the Northern US and Canada.
>>> >
>>> > IMHO it tastes better and has a really nice nutty texture. I doubt
>>> > you'd appreciate the difference.
>>> >
>>> > Jill
>>>
>>> Oops. Sent blank reply. I think I may have had some in the past. I
>>> do remember getting some brown stuff but can't remember where I got
>>> it. I also remember tossing out half of the packet because it just
>>> didn't have much flavor. As for food textures, I am big into that.

>>
>>Don't be too suprised if the taste of brown doesnt appeal. Some love
>>it (I like it for a variation) but some dislike it (Don and Charlotte).
>>It's specifically the nutty flavor they feel off putting in a rice.
>>
>>The texture of brown didnt appeal to me that much but then I am so used
>>to medium grain sticky, that singlit grain types do not appeal to me.

>
>This is different. This isn't rice as you are thinking. Although
>called rice it is a grass and is much different than traditional rice.
>Janet US


What you are refering to as tradional rice is also a grass, there are
many, many varieties, all grass.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rice
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On Thu, 11 Feb 2016 20:50:07 -0700, Janet B >
wrote:

>On Thu, 11 Feb 2016 19:51:40 -0600, "cshenk" > wrote:
>
>>Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>>
>>>
>>> "cshenk" > wrote in message
>>> ...
>>> > Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>>> >
>>> > >
>>> > wrote in message
>>> > > ...
>>> >>> I like canned spanish rice.
>>> > >
>>> > > I bought some many years ago that was good. Can't remember the
>>> > > brand or where I was living when I bought it. But the only kind
>>> > > I can find now in a can isn't good.
>>> >
>>> > I have never noticed canned rice. Could be they don't sell it
>>> > here. I *do* recall a rather nice small can at HEB in San Antonio
>>> > Texas that was a premade 'spanish rice' seasonings. You added it
>>> > to cooked rice.
>>> >
>>> > Fortunately for me I have a rice machine (small unit) so even if I
>>> > don't feel like cooking, that one is easy. If I'm really lazy, I
>>> > ask my daughter to make it (grin).
>>>
>>> I most likely bought it at the military commissary and as I'm sure
>>> you know, they often sell things that you can't get elsewhere. But
>>> how can you do Spanish rice in a rice machine? How would you brown
>>> it?

>>
>>Smile, you make the rice then brown it if that particular recipe calls
>>for browning at all. Fact is there are so many varieties of 'spanish
>>or mexican rice' that it's very possible you are used to making it
>>almost rice-a-roni ish where you brown the rice in butter then add the
>>water and seasonings?
>>
>>Others use fresh cooked rice which is then lightly stir fried in butter
>>and olive oil then added spices and tomatoes are added.
>>
>>A simple sort that is soft and works well is to make a batch of rice
>>(you'd want about 3 cups yield at least) then add Ro-Tel (or a store
>>knock off) and heat then serve. Some heat the ro-tel separate in the
>>microwave then use it to top the rice. While not haute cuisine, it's
>>simple and fast and in your house may be more effective since people
>>could chose to top the rice with that or something else.

>
>The dish is a pilaf and is thousands of years old. Pilaf exists every
>where in the world and is made according to local traditions Generally
>the basics are rice is 'browned' in a fat, cooked in a broth and
>meats/vegetables are added. Rice a Roni, a rice and pasta dish is
>still a pilaf.
>Janet US


Pilaf is one of the most widely consumed dishes on the planet, most
every ethnicity has a basic version, frying the grains is not
manditory, most ethnicities do ny fry the rice prior to adding liquid,
in fact most rice that's fried is fried after cooking in liquid, as in
Chinese Fly Lice which is technically a pilaf.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pilaf
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On Fri, 12 Feb 2016 08:33:02 -0800 (PST), Roy >
wrote:

>On Friday, February 12, 2016 at 4:50:41 AM UTC-7, Julie Bove wrote:
>> "cshenk" > wrote in message
>> ...
>> > jmcquown wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>> >
>> >> On 2/11/2016 8:38 PM, cshenk wrote:
>> >> > Don't be too suprised if the taste of brown doesnt appeal. Some
>> >> > love it (I like it for a variation) but some dislike it (Don and
>> >> > Charlotte). It's specifically the nutty flavor they feel off
>> >> > putting in a rice.
>> >>
>> >> Don't forget, wild rice is not rice. It's grass seed. I love it but
>> >> I don't want to eat it all the time. Definitely not enough to think
>> >> about buying a case of canned wild rice.
>> >>
>> >> Jill
>> >
>> > I didnt. I speifically was talking Brown rice. Julie shifted to
>> > address brown rice.

>>
>> Nonsense. We were talking about wild rice. I can't eat regular rice so I
>> now eat wild rice. What I bought was the black, cultivated and some here
>> told me that the brown *wild* rice is better tasting.

>
>"I can't eat regular rice so I now eat wild rice."...hmmm, I was led to believe that rice is pretty innocuous when it comes to food intolerance's. Most people can digest it with no problems.
>=====


Rice cereal is one of the first solid foods fed to newborns.
http://www.walmart.com/c/kp/gerber-rice-baby-food
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On Fri, 12 Feb 2016 03:43:13 -0800, "Julie Bove"
> wrote:

>
>"cshenk" > wrote in message
...
>> Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>>
>>>
>>> "cshenk" > wrote in message
>>> ...
>>> > Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>>> >
>>> > >
>>> > wrote in message
>>> > > ...
>>> >>> I like canned spanish rice.
>>> > >
>>> > > I bought some many years ago that was good. Can't remember the
>>> > > brand or where I was living when I bought it. But the only kind
>>> > > I can find now in a can isn't good.
>>> >
>>> > I have never noticed canned rice. Could be they don't sell it
>>> > here. I *do* recall a rather nice small can at HEB in San Antonio
>>> > Texas that was a premade 'spanish rice' seasonings. You added it
>>> > to cooked rice.
>>> >
>>> > Fortunately for me I have a rice machine (small unit) so even if I
>>> > don't feel like cooking, that one is easy. If I'm really lazy, I
>>> > ask my daughter to make it (grin).
>>>
>>> I most likely bought it at the military commissary and as I'm sure
>>> you know, they often sell things that you can't get elsewhere. But
>>> how can you do Spanish rice in a rice machine? How would you brown
>>> it?

>>
>> Smile, you make the rice then brown it if that particular recipe calls
>> for browning at all. Fact is there are so many varieties of 'spanish
>> or mexican rice' that it's very possible you are used to making it
>> almost rice-a-roni ish where you brown the rice in butter then add the
>> water and seasonings?

>
>That makes no sense. The rice should be browned before cooking for Spanish
>rice. And I don't use butter but olive oil. But yes, that is how it should
>be done.
>>
>> Others use fresh cooked rice which is then lightly stir fried in butter
>> and olive oil then added spices and tomatoes are added.

>
>Have never ever seen such a recipe. Never.
>>
>> A simple sort that is soft and works well is to make a batch of rice
>> (you'd want about 3 cups yield at least) then add Ro-Tel (or a store
>> knock off) and heat then serve. Some heat the ro-tel separate in the
>> microwave then use it to top the rice. While not haute cuisine, it's
>> simple and fast and in your house may be more effective since people
>> could chose to top the rice with that or something else.

>
>No thanks. That is not how I make it at all. Actually I don't make it at
>all now since I was the only one who really liked it. And I can't have rice
>now. For me, Spanish rice has meat in it and is a meal. Mexican rice
>shouldn't have any chunks of stuff in it. Unless of course you are doing
>something like cilantro lime rice.


There are probably a million versions of Spanish rice, ALL authentic.
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On Friday, February 12, 2016 at 8:50:16 AM UTC-10, Brooklyn1 wrote:
> On Thu, 11 Feb 2016 20:50:07 -0700, Janet B >
> wrote:
>
> >On Thu, 11 Feb 2016 19:51:40 -0600, "cshenk" > wrote:
> >
> >>Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:
> >>
> >>>
> >>> "cshenk" > wrote in message
> >>> ...
> >>> > Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:
> >>> >
> >>> > >
> >>> > wrote in message
> >>> > > ...
> >>> >>> I like canned spanish rice.
> >>> > >
> >>> > > I bought some many years ago that was good. Can't remember the
> >>> > > brand or where I was living when I bought it. But the only kind
> >>> > > I can find now in a can isn't good.
> >>> >
> >>> > I have never noticed canned rice. Could be they don't sell it
> >>> > here. I *do* recall a rather nice small can at HEB in San Antonio
> >>> > Texas that was a premade 'spanish rice' seasonings. You added it
> >>> > to cooked rice.
> >>> >
> >>> > Fortunately for me I have a rice machine (small unit) so even if I
> >>> > don't feel like cooking, that one is easy. If I'm really lazy, I
> >>> > ask my daughter to make it (grin).
> >>>
> >>> I most likely bought it at the military commissary and as I'm sure
> >>> you know, they often sell things that you can't get elsewhere. But
> >>> how can you do Spanish rice in a rice machine? How would you brown
> >>> it?
> >>
> >>Smile, you make the rice then brown it if that particular recipe calls
> >>for browning at all. Fact is there are so many varieties of 'spanish
> >>or mexican rice' that it's very possible you are used to making it
> >>almost rice-a-roni ish where you brown the rice in butter then add the
> >>water and seasonings?
> >>
> >>Others use fresh cooked rice which is then lightly stir fried in butter
> >>and olive oil then added spices and tomatoes are added.
> >>
> >>A simple sort that is soft and works well is to make a batch of rice
> >>(you'd want about 3 cups yield at least) then add Ro-Tel (or a store
> >>knock off) and heat then serve. Some heat the ro-tel separate in the
> >>microwave then use it to top the rice. While not haute cuisine, it's
> >>simple and fast and in your house may be more effective since people
> >>could chose to top the rice with that or something else.

> >
> >The dish is a pilaf and is thousands of years old. Pilaf exists every
> >where in the world and is made according to local traditions Generally
> >the basics are rice is 'browned' in a fat, cooked in a broth and
> >meats/vegetables are added. Rice a Roni, a rice and pasta dish is
> >still a pilaf.
> >Janet US

>
> Pilaf is one of the most widely consumed dishes on the planet, most
> every ethnicity has a basic version, frying the grains is not
> manditory, most ethnicities do ny fry the rice prior to adding liquid,
> in fact most rice that's fried is fried after cooking in liquid, as in
> Chinese Fly Lice which is technically a pilaf.
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pilaf


Asians don't ever cook rice in any kind of broth. I suppose some might but I've never seen it happen. Fried rice is prepared with pre-cooked white rice. I suppose some trendy restaurants might use brown rice but I've never seen it. There is jook, which is a popular soup made with rice but it's always made cooked white rice. Asians are unabashedly unoriginal when it comes to cooking rice.


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"Janet B" > wrote in message
...
> On Fri, 12 Feb 2016 03:45:35 -0800, "Julie Bove"
> > wrote:
>
>>
>>"Janet B" > wrote in message
. ..
>>> On Thu, 11 Feb 2016 19:51:40 -0600, "cshenk" > wrote:
>>>
>>>>Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> "cshenk" > wrote in message
>>>>> ...
>>>>> > Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>>>>> >
>>>>> > >
>>>>> > wrote in message
>>>>> > > ...
>>>>> >>> I like canned spanish rice.
>>>>> > >
>>>>> > > I bought some many years ago that was good. Can't remember the
>>>>> > > brand or where I was living when I bought it. But the only kind
>>>>> > > I can find now in a can isn't good.
>>>>> >
>>>>> > I have never noticed canned rice. Could be they don't sell it
>>>>> > here. I *do* recall a rather nice small can at HEB in San Antonio
>>>>> > Texas that was a premade 'spanish rice' seasonings. You added it
>>>>> > to cooked rice.
>>>>> >
>>>>> > Fortunately for me I have a rice machine (small unit) so even if I
>>>>> > don't feel like cooking, that one is easy. If I'm really lazy, I
>>>>> > ask my daughter to make it (grin).
>>>>>
>>>>> I most likely bought it at the military commissary and as I'm sure
>>>>> you know, they often sell things that you can't get elsewhere. But
>>>>> how can you do Spanish rice in a rice machine? How would you brown
>>>>> it?
>>>>
>>>>Smile, you make the rice then brown it if that particular recipe calls
>>>>for browning at all. Fact is there are so many varieties of 'spanish
>>>>or mexican rice' that it's very possible you are used to making it
>>>>almost rice-a-roni ish where you brown the rice in butter then add the
>>>>water and seasonings?
>>>>
>>>>Others use fresh cooked rice which is then lightly stir fried in butter
>>>>and olive oil then added spices and tomatoes are added.
>>>>
>>>>A simple sort that is soft and works well is to make a batch of rice
>>>>(you'd want about 3 cups yield at least) then add Ro-Tel (or a store
>>>>knock off) and heat then serve. Some heat the ro-tel separate in the
>>>>microwave then use it to top the rice. While not haute cuisine, it's
>>>>simple and fast and in your house may be more effective since people
>>>>could chose to top the rice with that or something else.
>>>
>>> The dish is a pilaf and is thousands of years old. Pilaf exists every
>>> where in the world and is made according to local traditions Generally
>>> the basics are rice is 'browned' in a fat, cooked in a broth and
>>> meats/vegetables are added. Rice a Roni, a rice and pasta dish is
>>> still a pilaf.
>>> Janet US

>>
>>Not according to this:
>>
>>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pilaf

>
> It is the style of the dish as opposed to cooking the rice in water
> and eating plain or cooking the rice and then adding to other
> ingredients to the rice. The rice, broth and other ingredients are
> cooked together. I investigated pilaf years and years ago when I
> noticed the likeness of several recipes
> Carol's cooked rice with Rotel added to the cooked rice is not pilaf.
> Arroz con Pollo is pilaf because the broth, chicken and vegetables are
> cooked together.. As far as I can tell, Mexican/Spanish rice is pilaf
> I very carefully said 'made according to local traditions' and
> 'generally the basics'. There are huge variations in the dish. Read
> some recipes. Quite a few include pasta and some even include
> potatoes.
> Sorry, I didn't want to be "teachy", I'm just fascinated by how few
> actual different 'recipes' there are. There are base methods that
> have been adjusted to reflect available food stuffs, climate,
> religions.
> Photos of huge differences:
> http://tinyurl.com/gvfmclx
> Janet US


But you said that the rice was browned in fat. I suppose some recipes might
be but my mom always made hers in the oven and it wasn't browned in fat. I
did look it up and didn't see any that was browned in fat either. I once
made a Greek rice and spinach dish where not only was the rice browned in
fat to start with but it was made in a skillet with no lid. You added broth
to it as it cooked, stirring all the while. I only made it once as nobody
else liked it. I did. But it wasn't called pilaf.

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"dsi1" > wrote in message
...
On Friday, February 12, 2016 at 8:50:16 AM UTC-10, Brooklyn1 wrote:
> On Thu, 11 Feb 2016 20:50:07 -0700, Janet B >
> wrote:
>
> >On Thu, 11 Feb 2016 19:51:40 -0600, "cshenk" > wrote:
> >
> >>Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:
> >>
> >>>
> >>> "cshenk" > wrote in message
> >>> ...
> >>> > Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:
> >>> >
> >>> > >
> >>> > wrote in message
> >>> > > ...
> >>> >>> I like canned spanish rice.
> >>> > >
> >>> > > I bought some many years ago that was good. Can't remember the
> >>> > > brand or where I was living when I bought it. But the only kind
> >>> > > I can find now in a can isn't good.
> >>> >
> >>> > I have never noticed canned rice. Could be they don't sell it
> >>> > here. I *do* recall a rather nice small can at HEB in San Antonio
> >>> > Texas that was a premade 'spanish rice' seasonings. You added it
> >>> > to cooked rice.
> >>> >
> >>> > Fortunately for me I have a rice machine (small unit) so even if I
> >>> > don't feel like cooking, that one is easy. If I'm really lazy, I
> >>> > ask my daughter to make it (grin).
> >>>
> >>> I most likely bought it at the military commissary and as I'm sure
> >>> you know, they often sell things that you can't get elsewhere. But
> >>> how can you do Spanish rice in a rice machine? How would you brown
> >>> it?
> >>
> >>Smile, you make the rice then brown it if that particular recipe calls
> >>for browning at all. Fact is there are so many varieties of 'spanish
> >>or mexican rice' that it's very possible you are used to making it
> >>almost rice-a-roni ish where you brown the rice in butter then add the
> >>water and seasonings?
> >>
> >>Others use fresh cooked rice which is then lightly stir fried in butter
> >>and olive oil then added spices and tomatoes are added.
> >>
> >>A simple sort that is soft and works well is to make a batch of rice
> >>(you'd want about 3 cups yield at least) then add Ro-Tel (or a store
> >>knock off) and heat then serve. Some heat the ro-tel separate in the
> >>microwave then use it to top the rice. While not haute cuisine, it's
> >>simple and fast and in your house may be more effective since people
> >>could chose to top the rice with that or something else.

> >
> >The dish is a pilaf and is thousands of years old. Pilaf exists every
> >where in the world and is made according to local traditions Generally
> >the basics are rice is 'browned' in a fat, cooked in a broth and
> >meats/vegetables are added. Rice a Roni, a rice and pasta dish is
> >still a pilaf.
> >Janet US

>
> Pilaf is one of the most widely consumed dishes on the planet, most
> every ethnicity has a basic version, frying the grains is not
> manditory, most ethnicities do ny fry the rice prior to adding liquid,
> in fact most rice that's fried is fried after cooking in liquid, as in
> Chinese Fly Lice which is technically a pilaf.
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pilaf


Asians don't ever cook rice in any kind of broth. I suppose some might but
I've never seen it happen. Fried rice is prepared with pre-cooked white
rice. I suppose some trendy restaurants might use brown rice but I've never
seen it. There is jook, which is a popular soup made with rice but it's
always made cooked white rice. Asians are unabashedly unoriginal when it
comes to cooking rice.

---

Some Asian places here do offer brown rice or even brown fried rice but they
are the Americanized places. Asians don't put salt or fat in the rice
either. My friend was horrified when I told her how I made rice as she only
ever makes the Japanese style.

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"Roy" > wrote in message
...
> On Friday, February 12, 2016 at 4:50:41 AM UTC-7, Julie Bove wrote:
>> "cshenk" > wrote in message
>> ...
>> > jmcquown wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>> >
>> >> On 2/11/2016 8:38 PM, cshenk wrote:
>> >> > Don't be too suprised if the taste of brown doesnt appeal. Some
>> >> > love it (I like it for a variation) but some dislike it (Don and
>> >> > Charlotte). It's specifically the nutty flavor they feel off
>> >> > putting in a rice.
>> >>
>> >> Don't forget, wild rice is not rice. It's grass seed. I love it but
>> >> I don't want to eat it all the time. Definitely not enough to think
>> >> about buying a case of canned wild rice.
>> >>
>> >> Jill
>> >
>> > I didnt. I speifically was talking Brown rice. Julie shifted to
>> > address brown rice.

>>
>> Nonsense. We were talking about wild rice. I can't eat regular rice so
>> I
>> now eat wild rice. What I bought was the black, cultivated and some here
>> told me that the brown *wild* rice is better tasting.

>
> "I can't eat regular rice so I now eat wild rice."...hmmm, I was led to
> believe that rice is pretty innocuous when it comes to food intolerance's.
> Most people can digest it with no problems.
> =====


Then you were led to believe wrongly. There is more to food intolerance
than just digesting. In my case, the known symptom was high blood sugar. I
had been having bad stomach pains as well which is why I sent for the test.
I don't know which food was the culprit there and I can't say for sure that
the rice was.

I sent for the test prior due to stomach pains and it turned up corn and
potatoes. I stopped eating those and my blood sugar dropped and the pains
stopped. But now those are no longer a problem.

With food intolerances, if you eat too much of something too often, you can
become intolerant to it. That was likely what was happening to me with rice
as I was eating a lot of it. And not just as a whole food. But since I had
to avoid things like cornstarch, I was having rice starch.

I am trying to be careful now not to eat corn or potatoes too often. I
suspect that potatoes became a problem following my foot injury. "Baked"
potatoes were easy to make in the microwave and I was having one almost
nightly for dinner. And for a snack I was often having some form of corn
chip with bean dip.

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"Dave Smith" > wrote in message
...
> On 2016-02-12 11:33 AM, Roy wrote:
>> On Friday, February 12, 2016 at 4:50:41 AM UTC-7, Julie Bove wrote:

>
>>>> I didnt. I speifically was talking Brown rice. Julie shifted
>>>> to address brown rice.
>>>
>>> Nonsense. We were talking about wild rice. I can't eat regular
>>> rice so I now eat wild rice. What I bought was the black,
>>> cultivated and some here told me that the brown *wild* rice is
>>> better tasting.

>>
>> "I can't eat regular rice so I now eat wild rice."...hmmm, I was led
>> to believe that rice is pretty innocuous when it comes to food
>> intolerance's. Most people can digest it with no problems. =====

>
>
> Yep. Most normal people have no problem eating rice. She is definitely not
> normal. Don't worry. In a little while she will be posting about cooking
> and eating rice and deny that she ever said she could not eat it.


I will give you that. The way in which my body reacts to things is not
normal. Seems to run in the family. Not me but another family member had
an allergic reaction to an allergy pill. When I was younger, I had signs of
overdose from a single cold pill that at the time was a prescription item,
but no longer. I had to be carried out of work by a friend and taken to the
Dr. because it left me in such bad shape. Dr. sent me home to sleep it off
and it took a good 24 hours to get out of my system. And it used to be that
I had to avoid certain allergy meds as they would knock me flat for a good
48 hours. I would just sleep and sleep and sleep.

Then following my thyroid removal, I told the Dr. that I couldn't have
Vicodin as it made me very ill. He just chuckled and told me that I'd be
fine. I assumed that he meant he would give me something else. But no. I
didn't realize that was what they were giving me and it made me so very ill
that I wasn't making the connection that it was causing me to throw up and
hallucinate. Only after I saw the purple dragon flying through the room and
thinking that I saw my SIL throwing it chocolate chips to eat did I realize
that something just plain wasn't right. In fact it put me in such bad shape
that they could not let me leave the hospital. My breathing kept stopping.
One nurse yelled at me and told me to stop doing it. As if I was doing it
on purpose. She said whenever I relaxed, I had stopped breathing. Relax,
my eye! I think really it was more passing out and coming to. And there
were a lot more problems but I couldn't get them to listen to me because at
that point it was very difficult to speak and at best all I could do was
squeak.

The Drs. I have been seeing for some time are well aware of my weird
reactions to meds and are cautious in prescribing them. But this surgeon
was new to me and apparently didn't believe me.

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On 2/12/2016 10:09 AM, Julie Bove wrote:
>
> "Janet B" > wrote in message
> ...
>> On Fri, 12 Feb 2016 03:45:35 -0800, "Julie Bove"
>> > wrote:
>>
>>>
>>> "Janet B" > wrote in message
>>> ...
>>>> On Thu, 11 Feb 2016 19:51:40 -0600, "cshenk" > wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> "cshenk" > wrote in message
>>>>>> ...
>>>>>> > Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>>>>>> >
>>>>>> > >
>>>>>> > wrote in message
>>>>>> > > ...
>>>>>> >>> I like canned spanish rice.
>>>>>> > >
>>>>>> > > I bought some many years ago that was good. Can't remember the
>>>>>> > > brand or where I was living when I bought it. But the only kind
>>>>>> > > I can find now in a can isn't good.
>>>>>> >
>>>>>> > I have never noticed canned rice. Could be they don't sell it
>>>>>> > here. I *do* recall a rather nice small can at HEB in San Antonio
>>>>>> > Texas that was a premade 'spanish rice' seasonings. You added it
>>>>>> > to cooked rice.
>>>>>> >
>>>>>> > Fortunately for me I have a rice machine (small unit) so even if I
>>>>>> > don't feel like cooking, that one is easy. If I'm really lazy, I
>>>>>> > ask my daughter to make it (grin).
>>>>>>
>>>>>> I most likely bought it at the military commissary and as I'm sure
>>>>>> you know, they often sell things that you can't get elsewhere. But
>>>>>> how can you do Spanish rice in a rice machine? How would you brown
>>>>>> it?
>>>>>
>>>>> Smile, you make the rice then brown it if that particular recipe calls
>>>>> for browning at all. Fact is there are so many varieties of 'spanish
>>>>> or mexican rice' that it's very possible you are used to making it
>>>>> almost rice-a-roni ish where you brown the rice in butter then add the
>>>>> water and seasonings?
>>>>>
>>>>> Others use fresh cooked rice which is then lightly stir fried in
>>>>> butter
>>>>> and olive oil then added spices and tomatoes are added.
>>>>>
>>>>> A simple sort that is soft and works well is to make a batch of rice
>>>>> (you'd want about 3 cups yield at least) then add Ro-Tel (or a store
>>>>> knock off) and heat then serve. Some heat the ro-tel separate in the
>>>>> microwave then use it to top the rice. While not haute cuisine, it's
>>>>> simple and fast and in your house may be more effective since people
>>>>> could chose to top the rice with that or something else.
>>>>
>>>> The dish is a pilaf and is thousands of years old. Pilaf exists every
>>>> where in the world and is made according to local traditions Generally
>>>> the basics are rice is 'browned' in a fat, cooked in a broth and
>>>> meats/vegetables are added. Rice a Roni, a rice and pasta dish is
>>>> still a pilaf.
>>>> Janet US
>>>
>>> Not according to this:
>>>
>>> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pilaf

>>
>> It is the style of the dish as opposed to cooking the rice in water
>> and eating plain or cooking the rice and then adding to other
>> ingredients to the rice. The rice, broth and other ingredients are
>> cooked together. I investigated pilaf years and years ago when I
>> noticed the likeness of several recipes
>> Carol's cooked rice with Rotel added to the cooked rice is not pilaf.
>> Arroz con Pollo is pilaf because the broth, chicken and vegetables are
>> cooked together.. As far as I can tell, Mexican/Spanish rice is pilaf
>> I very carefully said 'made according to local traditions' and
>> 'generally the basics'. There are huge variations in the dish. Read
>> some recipes. Quite a few include pasta and some even include
>> potatoes.
>> Sorry, I didn't want to be "teachy", I'm just fascinated by how few
>> actual different 'recipes' there are. There are base methods that
>> have been adjusted to reflect available food stuffs, climate,
>> religions.
>> Photos of huge differences:
>> http://tinyurl.com/gvfmclx
>> Janet US

>
> But you said that the rice was browned in fat. I suppose some recipes
> might be but my mom always made hers in the oven and it wasn't browned
> in fat. I did look it up and didn't see any that was browned in fat
> either. I once made a Greek rice and spinach dish where not only was
> the rice browned in fat to start with but it was made in a skillet with
> no lid. You added broth to it as it cooked, stirring all the while. I
> only made it once as nobody else liked it. I did. But it wasn't
> called pilaf.


I have fried raw rice in a pan when making Spanish rice. I was never
able to make an acceptable Spanish rice though. Mostly, people learn
this odd technique from making that San Francisco treat - Rice-A-Roni.


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On 2/12/2016 10:11 AM, Julie Bove wrote:
>
> "dsi1" > wrote in message
> ...
> On Friday, February 12, 2016 at 8:50:16 AM UTC-10, Brooklyn1 wrote:
>> On Thu, 11 Feb 2016 20:50:07 -0700, Janet B >
>> wrote:
>>
>> >On Thu, 11 Feb 2016 19:51:40 -0600, "cshenk" > wrote:
>> >
>> >>Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>> >>
>> >>>
>> >>> "cshenk" > wrote in message
>> >>> ...
>> >>> > Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>> >>> >
>> >>> > >
>> >>> > wrote in message
>> >>> > > ...
>> >>> >>> I like canned spanish rice.
>> >>> > >
>> >>> > > I bought some many years ago that was good. Can't remember the
>> >>> > > brand or where I was living when I bought it. But the only kind
>> >>> > > I can find now in a can isn't good.
>> >>> >
>> >>> > I have never noticed canned rice. Could be they don't sell it
>> >>> > here. I *do* recall a rather nice small can at HEB in San Antonio
>> >>> > Texas that was a premade 'spanish rice' seasonings. You added it
>> >>> > to cooked rice.
>> >>> >
>> >>> > Fortunately for me I have a rice machine (small unit) so even if I
>> >>> > don't feel like cooking, that one is easy. If I'm really lazy, I
>> >>> > ask my daughter to make it (grin).
>> >>>
>> >>> I most likely bought it at the military commissary and as I'm sure
>> >>> you know, they often sell things that you can't get elsewhere. But
>> >>> how can you do Spanish rice in a rice machine? How would you brown
>> >>> it?
>> >>
>> >>Smile, you make the rice then brown it if that particular recipe calls
>> >>for browning at all. Fact is there are so many varieties of 'spanish
>> >>or mexican rice' that it's very possible you are used to making it
>> >>almost rice-a-roni ish where you brown the rice in butter then add the
>> >>water and seasonings?
>> >>
>> >>Others use fresh cooked rice which is then lightly stir fried in butter
>> >>and olive oil then added spices and tomatoes are added.
>> >>
>> >>A simple sort that is soft and works well is to make a batch of rice
>> >>(you'd want about 3 cups yield at least) then add Ro-Tel (or a store
>> >>knock off) and heat then serve. Some heat the ro-tel separate in the
>> >>microwave then use it to top the rice. While not haute cuisine, it's
>> >>simple and fast and in your house may be more effective since people
>> >>could chose to top the rice with that or something else.
>> >
>> >The dish is a pilaf and is thousands of years old. Pilaf exists every
>> >where in the world and is made according to local traditions Generally
>> >the basics are rice is 'browned' in a fat, cooked in a broth and
>> >meats/vegetables are added. Rice a Roni, a rice and pasta dish is
>> >still a pilaf.
>> >Janet US

>>
>> Pilaf is one of the most widely consumed dishes on the planet, most
>> every ethnicity has a basic version, frying the grains is not
>> manditory, most ethnicities do ny fry the rice prior to adding liquid,
>> in fact most rice that's fried is fried after cooking in liquid, as in
>> Chinese Fly Lice which is technically a pilaf.
>> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pilaf

>
> Asians don't ever cook rice in any kind of broth. I suppose some might
> but I've never seen it happen. Fried rice is prepared with pre-cooked
> white rice. I suppose some trendy restaurants might use brown rice but
> I've never seen it. There is jook, which is a popular soup made with
> rice but it's always made cooked white rice. Asians are unabashedly
> unoriginal when it comes to cooking rice.
>
> ---
>
> Some Asian places here do offer brown rice or even brown fried rice but
> they are the Americanized places. Asians don't put salt or fat in the
> rice either. My friend was horrified when I told her how I made rice as
> she only ever makes the Japanese style.


Asians would be surprised to learn that some Westerners don't wash their
rice before cooking. It's just not in my DNA to follow that practice.
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"dsi1" > wrote in message
...

> Asians would be surprised to learn that some Westerners don't wash their
> rice before cooking. It's just not in my DNA to follow that practice.


But washing the rice gets rid of that cloudy stuff with bits in ... yes?

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"Julie Bove" > wrote in message
...
>
> "dsi1" > wrote in message
> ...
> On Friday, February 12, 2016 at 8:50:16 AM UTC-10, Brooklyn1 wrote:
>> On Thu, 11 Feb 2016 20:50:07 -0700, Janet B >
>> wrote:
>>
>> >On Thu, 11 Feb 2016 19:51:40 -0600, "cshenk" > wrote:
>> >
>> >>Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>> >>
>> >>>
>> >>> "cshenk" > wrote in message
>> >>> ...
>> >>> > Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>> >>> >
>> >>> > >
>> >>> > wrote in message
>> >>> > > ...
>> >>> >>> I like canned spanish rice.
>> >>> > >
>> >>> > > I bought some many years ago that was good. Can't remember the
>> >>> > > brand or where I was living when I bought it. But the only kind
>> >>> > > I can find now in a can isn't good.
>> >>> >
>> >>> > I have never noticed canned rice. Could be they don't sell it
>> >>> > here. I *do* recall a rather nice small can at HEB in San Antonio
>> >>> > Texas that was a premade 'spanish rice' seasonings. You added it
>> >>> > to cooked rice.
>> >>> >
>> >>> > Fortunately for me I have a rice machine (small unit) so even if I
>> >>> > don't feel like cooking, that one is easy. If I'm really lazy, I
>> >>> > ask my daughter to make it (grin).
>> >>>
>> >>> I most likely bought it at the military commissary and as I'm sure
>> >>> you know, they often sell things that you can't get elsewhere. But
>> >>> how can you do Spanish rice in a rice machine? How would you brown
>> >>> it?
>> >>
>> >>Smile, you make the rice then brown it if that particular recipe calls
>> >>for browning at all. Fact is there are so many varieties of 'spanish
>> >>or mexican rice' that it's very possible you are used to making it
>> >>almost rice-a-roni ish where you brown the rice in butter then add the
>> >>water and seasonings?
>> >>
>> >>Others use fresh cooked rice which is then lightly stir fried in butter
>> >>and olive oil then added spices and tomatoes are added.
>> >>
>> >>A simple sort that is soft and works well is to make a batch of rice
>> >>(you'd want about 3 cups yield at least) then add Ro-Tel (or a store
>> >>knock off) and heat then serve. Some heat the ro-tel separate in the
>> >>microwave then use it to top the rice. While not haute cuisine, it's
>> >>simple and fast and in your house may be more effective since people
>> >>could chose to top the rice with that or something else.
>> >
>> >The dish is a pilaf and is thousands of years old. Pilaf exists every
>> >where in the world and is made according to local traditions Generally
>> >the basics are rice is 'browned' in a fat, cooked in a broth and
>> >meats/vegetables are added. Rice a Roni, a rice and pasta dish is
>> >still a pilaf.
>> >Janet US

>>
>> Pilaf is one of the most widely consumed dishes on the planet, most
>> every ethnicity has a basic version, frying the grains is not
>> manditory, most ethnicities do ny fry the rice prior to adding liquid,
>> in fact most rice that's fried is fried after cooking in liquid, as in
>> Chinese Fly Lice which is technically a pilaf.
>> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pilaf

>
> Asians don't ever cook rice in any kind of broth. I suppose some might but
> I've never seen it happen. Fried rice is prepared with pre-cooked white
> rice. I suppose some trendy restaurants might use brown rice but I've
> never seen it. There is jook, which is a popular soup made with rice but
> it's always made cooked white rice. Asians are unabashedly unoriginal when
> it comes to cooking rice.
>
> ---
>
> Some Asian places here do offer brown rice or even brown fried rice but
> they are the Americanized places. Asians don't put salt or fat in the
> rice either. My friend was horrified when I told her how I made rice as
> she only ever makes the Japanese style.


Your cooking habits horrify a lot of people.



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On 2/12/2016 12:11 PM, Julie Bove wrote:

> Asians don't ever cook rice in any kind of broth. I suppose some might
> but I've never seen it happen.


How far does one plumb to find the depths of your ignorance, anyway?

"A breakfast and lunch staple in many Asian countries and a mainstay at
the dim sum hall, congee is rice and water (or broth) cooked down into
a thick porridge."

http://www.seriouseats.com/2014/09/d...ng-congee.html

No wonder you get the kind of abuse heaped on you that you do here.

Please consider quitting entirely.
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On 2/12/2016 11:12 AM, dsi1 wrote:

> Asians don't ever cook rice in any kind of broth. I suppose some might but I've never seen it happen. Fried rice is prepared with pre-cooked white rice. I suppose some trendy restaurants might use brown rice but I've never seen it. There is jook, which is a popular soup made with rice but it's always made cooked white rice. Asians are unabashedly unoriginal when it comes to cooking rice.


Wrong.

http://www.seriouseats.com/2014/09/d...ng-congee.html



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On 2/12/2016 11:24 AM, Ophelia wrote:
>
>
> "dsi1" > wrote in message
> ...
>
>> Asians would be surprised to learn that some Westerners don't wash
>> their rice before cooking. It's just not in my DNA to follow that
>> practice.

>
> But washing the rice gets rid of that cloudy stuff with bits in ... yes?
>


I guess the rational is that American rice is super clean and contains
no talc. The best you can say about it is that it won't kill you if you
don't wash it. For Asians, that's not good enough! Hee hee.
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"dsi1" > wrote in message
...
> On 2/12/2016 11:24 AM, Ophelia wrote:
>>
>>
>> "dsi1" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>
>>> Asians would be surprised to learn that some Westerners don't wash
>>> their rice before cooking. It's just not in my DNA to follow that
>>> practice.

>>
>> But washing the rice gets rid of that cloudy stuff with bits in ... yes?
>>

>
> I guess the rational is that American rice is super clean and contains no
> talc. The best you can say about it is that it won't kill you if you don't
> wash it. For Asians, that's not good enough! Hee hee.


Well, I am not Asian, but ...



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On 2/12/2016 11:46 AM, Bolt Lits AG wrote:
> On 2/12/2016 11:12 AM, dsi1 wrote:
>
>> Asians don't ever cook rice in any kind of broth. I suppose some might
>> but I've never seen it happen. Fried rice is prepared with pre-cooked
>> white rice. I suppose some trendy restaurants might use brown rice but
>> I've never seen it. There is jook, which is a popular soup made with
>> rice but it's always made cooked white rice. Asians are unabashedly
>> unoriginal when it comes to cooking rice.

>
> Wrong.
>
> http://www.seriouseats.com/2014/09/d...ng-congee.html
>
>


I've made jook before. Did you even bother to read my post or your link?

I thought so.
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On Fri, 12 Feb 2016 12:00:06 -1000, dsi1 > wrote:

>
>I thought so.


Do you *really* have to encourage it?
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On Friday, February 12, 2016 at 12:15:17 PM UTC-10, Jeus wrote:
> On Fri, 12 Feb 2016 12:00:06 -1000, dsi1 > wrote:
>
> >
> >I thought so.

>
> Do you *really* have to encourage it?


Sorry, I lost my scorecard of who's who and what's what around here. I totally hamajang up.


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"dsi1" > wrote in message
...
> On 2/12/2016 10:09 AM, Julie Bove wrote:
>>
>> "Janet B" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>> On Fri, 12 Feb 2016 03:45:35 -0800, "Julie Bove"
>>> > wrote:
>>>
>>>>
>>>> "Janet B" > wrote in message
>>>> ...
>>>>> On Thu, 11 Feb 2016 19:51:40 -0600, "cshenk" > wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>> Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> "cshenk" > wrote in message
>>>>>>> ...
>>>>>>> > Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>>>>>>> >
>>>>>>> > >
>>>>>>> > wrote in message
>>>>>>> > > ...
>>>>>>> >>> I like canned spanish rice.
>>>>>>> > >
>>>>>>> > > I bought some many years ago that was good. Can't remember the
>>>>>>> > > brand or where I was living when I bought it. But the only kind
>>>>>>> > > I can find now in a can isn't good.
>>>>>>> >
>>>>>>> > I have never noticed canned rice. Could be they don't sell it
>>>>>>> > here. I *do* recall a rather nice small can at HEB in San Antonio
>>>>>>> > Texas that was a premade 'spanish rice' seasonings. You added it
>>>>>>> > to cooked rice.
>>>>>>> >
>>>>>>> > Fortunately for me I have a rice machine (small unit) so even if I
>>>>>>> > don't feel like cooking, that one is easy. If I'm really lazy, I
>>>>>>> > ask my daughter to make it (grin).
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> I most likely bought it at the military commissary and as I'm sure
>>>>>>> you know, they often sell things that you can't get elsewhere. But
>>>>>>> how can you do Spanish rice in a rice machine? How would you brown
>>>>>>> it?
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Smile, you make the rice then brown it if that particular recipe
>>>>>> calls
>>>>>> for browning at all. Fact is there are so many varieties of 'spanish
>>>>>> or mexican rice' that it's very possible you are used to making it
>>>>>> almost rice-a-roni ish where you brown the rice in butter then add
>>>>>> the
>>>>>> water and seasonings?
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Others use fresh cooked rice which is then lightly stir fried in
>>>>>> butter
>>>>>> and olive oil then added spices and tomatoes are added.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> A simple sort that is soft and works well is to make a batch of rice
>>>>>> (you'd want about 3 cups yield at least) then add Ro-Tel (or a store
>>>>>> knock off) and heat then serve. Some heat the ro-tel separate in the
>>>>>> microwave then use it to top the rice. While not haute cuisine, it's
>>>>>> simple and fast and in your house may be more effective since people
>>>>>> could chose to top the rice with that or something else.
>>>>>
>>>>> The dish is a pilaf and is thousands of years old. Pilaf exists every
>>>>> where in the world and is made according to local traditions Generally
>>>>> the basics are rice is 'browned' in a fat, cooked in a broth and
>>>>> meats/vegetables are added. Rice a Roni, a rice and pasta dish is
>>>>> still a pilaf.
>>>>> Janet US
>>>>
>>>> Not according to this:
>>>>
>>>> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pilaf
>>>
>>> It is the style of the dish as opposed to cooking the rice in water
>>> and eating plain or cooking the rice and then adding to other
>>> ingredients to the rice. The rice, broth and other ingredients are
>>> cooked together. I investigated pilaf years and years ago when I
>>> noticed the likeness of several recipes
>>> Carol's cooked rice with Rotel added to the cooked rice is not pilaf.
>>> Arroz con Pollo is pilaf because the broth, chicken and vegetables are
>>> cooked together.. As far as I can tell, Mexican/Spanish rice is pilaf
>>> I very carefully said 'made according to local traditions' and
>>> 'generally the basics'. There are huge variations in the dish. Read
>>> some recipes. Quite a few include pasta and some even include
>>> potatoes.
>>> Sorry, I didn't want to be "teachy", I'm just fascinated by how few
>>> actual different 'recipes' there are. There are base methods that
>>> have been adjusted to reflect available food stuffs, climate,
>>> religions.
>>> Photos of huge differences:
>>> http://tinyurl.com/gvfmclx
>>> Janet US

>>
>> But you said that the rice was browned in fat. I suppose some recipes
>> might be but my mom always made hers in the oven and it wasn't browned
>> in fat. I did look it up and didn't see any that was browned in fat
>> either. I once made a Greek rice and spinach dish where not only was
>> the rice browned in fat to start with but it was made in a skillet with
>> no lid. You added broth to it as it cooked, stirring all the while. I
>> only made it once as nobody else liked it. I did. But it wasn't
>> called pilaf.

>
> I have fried raw rice in a pan when making Spanish rice. I was never able
> to make an acceptable Spanish rice though. Mostly, people learn this odd
> technique from making that San Francisco treat - Rice-A-Roni.


I grew up eating that stuff and it was no treat! Then I remember getting my
first apartment and time and time again buying their Spanish or Mexican or
whatever they called it rice when it was on sale. It was awful. But I kept
trying because people kept telling me that I must be making it wrong. No.
It's just awful and not a thing like the real thing.

Oddly enough, my husband who is not a fan of rice or pasta will eat
Rice-A-Roni and likes it.

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"dsi1" > wrote in message
...
> On 2/12/2016 10:11 AM, Julie Bove wrote:
>>
>> "dsi1" > wrote in message
>> ...
>> On Friday, February 12, 2016 at 8:50:16 AM UTC-10, Brooklyn1 wrote:
>>> On Thu, 11 Feb 2016 20:50:07 -0700, Janet B >
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>> >On Thu, 11 Feb 2016 19:51:40 -0600, "cshenk" > wrote:
>>> >
>>> >>Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>>> >>
>>> >>>
>>> >>> "cshenk" > wrote in message
>>> >>> ...
>>> >>> > Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>>> >>> >
>>> >>> > >
>>> >>> > wrote in message
>>> >>> > > ...
>>> >>> >>> I like canned spanish rice.
>>> >>> > >
>>> >>> > > I bought some many years ago that was good. Can't remember the
>>> >>> > > brand or where I was living when I bought it. But the only kind
>>> >>> > > I can find now in a can isn't good.
>>> >>> >
>>> >>> > I have never noticed canned rice. Could be they don't sell it
>>> >>> > here. I *do* recall a rather nice small can at HEB in San Antonio
>>> >>> > Texas that was a premade 'spanish rice' seasonings. You added it
>>> >>> > to cooked rice.
>>> >>> >
>>> >>> > Fortunately for me I have a rice machine (small unit) so even if I
>>> >>> > don't feel like cooking, that one is easy. If I'm really lazy, I
>>> >>> > ask my daughter to make it (grin).
>>> >>>
>>> >>> I most likely bought it at the military commissary and as I'm sure
>>> >>> you know, they often sell things that you can't get elsewhere. But
>>> >>> how can you do Spanish rice in a rice machine? How would you brown
>>> >>> it?
>>> >>
>>> >>Smile, you make the rice then brown it if that particular recipe calls
>>> >>for browning at all. Fact is there are so many varieties of 'spanish
>>> >>or mexican rice' that it's very possible you are used to making it
>>> >>almost rice-a-roni ish where you brown the rice in butter then add the
>>> >>water and seasonings?
>>> >>
>>> >>Others use fresh cooked rice which is then lightly stir fried in
>>> >>butter
>>> >>and olive oil then added spices and tomatoes are added.
>>> >>
>>> >>A simple sort that is soft and works well is to make a batch of rice
>>> >>(you'd want about 3 cups yield at least) then add Ro-Tel (or a store
>>> >>knock off) and heat then serve. Some heat the ro-tel separate in the
>>> >>microwave then use it to top the rice. While not haute cuisine, it's
>>> >>simple and fast and in your house may be more effective since people
>>> >>could chose to top the rice with that or something else.
>>> >
>>> >The dish is a pilaf and is thousands of years old. Pilaf exists every
>>> >where in the world and is made according to local traditions Generally
>>> >the basics are rice is 'browned' in a fat, cooked in a broth and
>>> >meats/vegetables are added. Rice a Roni, a rice and pasta dish is
>>> >still a pilaf.
>>> >Janet US
>>>
>>> Pilaf is one of the most widely consumed dishes on the planet, most
>>> every ethnicity has a basic version, frying the grains is not
>>> manditory, most ethnicities do ny fry the rice prior to adding liquid,
>>> in fact most rice that's fried is fried after cooking in liquid, as in
>>> Chinese Fly Lice which is technically a pilaf.
>>> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pilaf

>>
>> Asians don't ever cook rice in any kind of broth. I suppose some might
>> but I've never seen it happen. Fried rice is prepared with pre-cooked
>> white rice. I suppose some trendy restaurants might use brown rice but
>> I've never seen it. There is jook, which is a popular soup made with
>> rice but it's always made cooked white rice. Asians are unabashedly
>> unoriginal when it comes to cooking rice.
>>
>> ---
>>
>> Some Asian places here do offer brown rice or even brown fried rice but
>> they are the Americanized places. Asians don't put salt or fat in the
>> rice either. My friend was horrified when I told her how I made rice as
>> she only ever makes the Japanese style.

>
> Asians would be surprised to learn that some Westerners don't wash their
> rice before cooking. It's just not in my DNA to follow that practice.


That's not always true. Depends on the kind of rice. Some of it needs to
be washed. Some doesn't.

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"Ophelia" > wrote in message
...
>
>
> "dsi1" > wrote in message
> ...
>
>> Asians would be surprised to learn that some Westerners don't wash their
>> rice before cooking. It's just not in my DNA to follow that practice.

>
> But washing the rice gets rid of that cloudy stuff with bits in ... yes?


If it is in there. Not all rice has that and not all needs to be washed.

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"Bolt Lits AG" > wrote in message
...
> On 2/12/2016 12:11 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
>
>> Asians don't ever cook rice in any kind of broth. I suppose some might
>> but I've never seen it happen.

>
> How far does one plumb to find the depths of your ignorance, anyway?
>
> "A breakfast and lunch staple in many Asian countries and a mainstay at
> the dim sum hall, congee is rice and water (or broth) cooked down into
> a thick porridge."
>
> http://www.seriouseats.com/2014/09/d...ng-congee.html
>
> No wonder you get the kind of abuse heaped on you that you do here.
>
> Please consider quitting entirely.



I don't think I wrote that.

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On 2/12/2016 1:03 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
>
> "dsi1" > wrote in message
> ...
>> On 2/12/2016 10:09 AM, Julie Bove wrote:
>>>
>>> "Janet B" > wrote in message
>>> ...
>>>> On Fri, 12 Feb 2016 03:45:35 -0800, "Julie Bove"
>>>> > wrote:
>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> "Janet B" > wrote in message
>>>>> ...
>>>>>> On Thu, 11 Feb 2016 19:51:40 -0600, "cshenk" > wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> "cshenk" > wrote in message
>>>>>>>> ...
>>>>>>>> > Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>>>>>>>> >
>>>>>>>> > >
>>>>>>>> > wrote in message
>>>>>>>> > > ...
>>>>>>>> >>> I like canned spanish rice.
>>>>>>>> > >
>>>>>>>> > > I bought some many years ago that was good. Can't remember the
>>>>>>>> > > brand or where I was living when I bought it. But the only
>>>>>>>> kind
>>>>>>>> > > I can find now in a can isn't good.
>>>>>>>> >
>>>>>>>> > I have never noticed canned rice. Could be they don't sell it
>>>>>>>> > here. I *do* recall a rather nice small can at HEB in San
>>>>>>>> Antonio
>>>>>>>> > Texas that was a premade 'spanish rice' seasonings. You added it
>>>>>>>> > to cooked rice.
>>>>>>>> >
>>>>>>>> > Fortunately for me I have a rice machine (small unit) so even
>>>>>>>> if I
>>>>>>>> > don't feel like cooking, that one is easy. If I'm really lazy, I
>>>>>>>> > ask my daughter to make it (grin).
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> I most likely bought it at the military commissary and as I'm sure
>>>>>>>> you know, they often sell things that you can't get elsewhere. But
>>>>>>>> how can you do Spanish rice in a rice machine? How would you brown
>>>>>>>> it?
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Smile, you make the rice then brown it if that particular recipe
>>>>>>> calls
>>>>>>> for browning at all. Fact is there are so many varieties of
>>>>>>> 'spanish
>>>>>>> or mexican rice' that it's very possible you are used to making it
>>>>>>> almost rice-a-roni ish where you brown the rice in butter then
>>>>>>> add the
>>>>>>> water and seasonings?
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Others use fresh cooked rice which is then lightly stir fried in
>>>>>>> butter
>>>>>>> and olive oil then added spices and tomatoes are added.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> A simple sort that is soft and works well is to make a batch of rice
>>>>>>> (you'd want about 3 cups yield at least) then add Ro-Tel (or a store
>>>>>>> knock off) and heat then serve. Some heat the ro-tel separate in
>>>>>>> the
>>>>>>> microwave then use it to top the rice. While not haute cuisine,
>>>>>>> it's
>>>>>>> simple and fast and in your house may be more effective since people
>>>>>>> could chose to top the rice with that or something else.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> The dish is a pilaf and is thousands of years old. Pilaf exists
>>>>>> every
>>>>>> where in the world and is made according to local traditions
>>>>>> Generally
>>>>>> the basics are rice is 'browned' in a fat, cooked in a broth and
>>>>>> meats/vegetables are added. Rice a Roni, a rice and pasta dish is
>>>>>> still a pilaf.
>>>>>> Janet US
>>>>>
>>>>> Not according to this:
>>>>>
>>>>> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pilaf
>>>>
>>>> It is the style of the dish as opposed to cooking the rice in water
>>>> and eating plain or cooking the rice and then adding to other
>>>> ingredients to the rice. The rice, broth and other ingredients are
>>>> cooked together. I investigated pilaf years and years ago when I
>>>> noticed the likeness of several recipes
>>>> Carol's cooked rice with Rotel added to the cooked rice is not pilaf.
>>>> Arroz con Pollo is pilaf because the broth, chicken and vegetables are
>>>> cooked together.. As far as I can tell, Mexican/Spanish rice is pilaf
>>>> I very carefully said 'made according to local traditions' and
>>>> 'generally the basics'. There are huge variations in the dish. Read
>>>> some recipes. Quite a few include pasta and some even include
>>>> potatoes.
>>>> Sorry, I didn't want to be "teachy", I'm just fascinated by how few
>>>> actual different 'recipes' there are. There are base methods that
>>>> have been adjusted to reflect available food stuffs, climate,
>>>> religions.
>>>> Photos of huge differences:
>>>> http://tinyurl.com/gvfmclx
>>>> Janet US
>>>
>>> But you said that the rice was browned in fat. I suppose some recipes
>>> might be but my mom always made hers in the oven and it wasn't browned
>>> in fat. I did look it up and didn't see any that was browned in fat
>>> either. I once made a Greek rice and spinach dish where not only was
>>> the rice browned in fat to start with but it was made in a skillet with
>>> no lid. You added broth to it as it cooked, stirring all the while. I
>>> only made it once as nobody else liked it. I did. But it wasn't
>>> called pilaf.

>>
>> I have fried raw rice in a pan when making Spanish rice. I was never
>> able to make an acceptable Spanish rice though. Mostly, people learn
>> this odd technique from making that San Francisco treat - Rice-A-Roni.

>
> I grew up eating that stuff and it was no treat! Then I remember
> getting my first apartment and time and time again buying their Spanish
> or Mexican or whatever they called it rice when it was on sale. It was
> awful. But I kept trying because people kept telling me that I must be
> making it wrong. No. It's just awful and not a thing like the real thing.
>
> Oddly enough, my husband who is not a fan of rice or pasta will eat
> Rice-A-Roni and likes it.


I've made Rice-A-Roni several times in my life because I like rice and
San Francisco. I thought browning the rice and pasta was a nutty idea
the first time I made it. You'd think it would give the dish a
toasted-nutty kind of taste but mostly it tastes like salty rice. That's
the breaks.


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Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:

>
> "Janet B" > wrote in message
> ... >On Thu, 11 Feb
> 2016 19:51:40 -0600, "cshenk" > wrote:
> >
> > > Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:
> > >
> > > >
> >>>"cshenk" > wrote in message
> > > > ...
> >>>> Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:
> > > > >
> >>>> >
> > wrote in message
> >>>> > ...
> >>>>>> I like canned spanish rice.
> >>>> >
> >>>> > I bought some many years ago that was good. Can't remember the
> >>>> > brand or where I was living when I bought it. But the only

> kind >>>> > I can find now in a can isn't good.
> > > > >
> >>>> I have never noticed canned rice. Could be they don't sell it
> >>>> here. I do recall a rather nice small can at HEB in San Antonio
> >>>> Texas that was a premade 'spanish rice' seasonings. You added it
> >>>> to cooked rice.
> > > > >
> >>>> Fortunately for me I have a rice machine (small unit) so even if

> I >>>> don't feel like cooking, that one is easy. If I'm really
> lazy, I >>>> ask my daughter to make it (grin).
> > > >
> > > > I most likely bought it at the military commissary and as I'm
> > > > sure you know, they often sell things that you can't get
> > > > elsewhere. But how can you do Spanish rice in a rice machine?
> > > > How would you brown it?
> > >
> > > Smile, you make the rice then brown it if that particular recipe
> > > calls for browning at all. Fact is there are so many varieties
> > > of 'spanish or mexican rice' that it's very possible you are used
> > > to making it almost rice-a-roni ish where you brown the rice in
> > > butter then add the water and seasonings?
> > >
> > > Others use fresh cooked rice which is then lightly stir fried in
> > > butter and olive oil then added spices and tomatoes are added.
> > >
> > > A simple sort that is soft and works well is to make a batch of
> > > rice (you'd want about 3 cups yield at least) then add Ro-Tel (or
> > > a store knock off) and heat then serve. Some heat the ro-tel
> > > separate in the microwave then use it to top the rice. While not
> > > haute cuisine, it's simple and fast and in your house may be more
> > > effective since people could chose to top the rice with that or
> > > something else.

> >
> > The dish is a pilaf and is thousands of years old. Pilaf exists
> > every where in the world and is made according to local traditions
> > Generally the basics are rice is 'browned' in a fat, cooked in a
> > broth and meats/vegetables are added. Rice a Roni, a rice and
> > pasta dish is still a pilaf.
> > Janet US

>
> Not according to this:
>
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pilaf


Julie, if you look up PILAF, of course you wil get PILAF.



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dsi1 wrote in rec.food.cooking:

> On Friday, February 12, 2016 at 8:50:16 AM UTC-10, Brooklyn1 wrote:
> > On Thu, 11 Feb 2016 20:50:07 -0700, Janet B >
> > wrote:
> >
> > >On Thu, 11 Feb 2016 19:51:40 -0600, "cshenk" >

> > wrote:
> > >
> > > > Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:
> > > >
> > >>>
> > >>> "cshenk" > wrote in message
> > >>> ...
> > >>> > Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:
> > >>> >
> > >>> > >
> > >>> > wrote in message
> > >>> > >

> > ... >>>
> > >>> I like canned spanish rice. >>> > >
> > >>> > > I bought some many years ago that was good. Can't remember

> > the >>> > > brand or where I was living when I bought it. But the
> > only kind >>> > > I can find now in a can isn't good.
> > >>> >
> > >>> > I have never noticed canned rice. Could be they don't sell it
> > >>> > here. I do recall a rather nice small can at HEB in San

> > Antonio >>> > Texas that was a premade 'spanish rice' seasonings.
> > You added it >>> > to cooked rice.
> > >>> >
> > >>> > Fortunately for me I have a rice machine (small unit) so even

> > if I >>> > don't feel like cooking, that one is easy. If I'm
> > really lazy, I >>> > ask my daughter to make it (grin).
> > >>>
> > >>> I most likely bought it at the military commissary and as I'm

> > sure >>> you know, they often sell things that you can't get
> > elsewhere. But >>> how can you do Spanish rice in a rice machine?
> > How would you brown >>> it?
> > > >
> > > > Smile, you make the rice then brown it if that particular
> > > > recipe calls for browning at all. Fact is there are so many
> > > > varieties of 'spanish or mexican rice' that it's very possible
> > > > you are used to making it almost rice-a-roni ish where you
> > > > brown the rice in butter then add the water and seasonings?
> > > >
> > > > Others use fresh cooked rice which is then lightly stir fried
> > > > in butter and olive oil then added spices and tomatoes are
> > > > added.
> > > >
> > > > A simple sort that is soft and works well is to make a batch of
> > > > rice (you'd want about 3 cups yield at least) then add Ro-Tel
> > > > (or a store knock off) and heat then serve. Some heat the
> > > > ro-tel separate in the microwave then use it to top the rice.
> > > > While not haute cuisine, it's simple and fast and in your house
> > > > may be more effective since people could chose to top the rice
> > > > with that or something else.
> > >
> > > The dish is a pilaf and is thousands of years old. Pilaf exists
> > > every where in the world and is made according to local
> > > traditions Generally the basics are rice is 'browned' in a fat,
> > > cooked in a broth and meats/vegetables are added. Rice a Roni, a
> > > rice and pasta dish is still a pilaf.
> > > Janet US

> >
> > Pilaf is one of the most widely consumed dishes on the planet, most
> > every ethnicity has a basic version, frying the grains is not
> > manditory, most ethnicities do ny fry the rice prior to adding
> > liquid, in fact most rice that's fried is fried after cooking in
> > liquid, as in Chinese Fly Lice which is technically a pilaf.
> > https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pilaf

>
> Asians don't ever cook rice in any kind of broth. I suppose some
> might but I've never seen it happen. Fried rice is prepared with
> pre-cooked white rice. I suppose some trendy restaurants might use
> brown rice but I've never seen it. There is jook, which is a popular
> soup made with rice but it's always made cooked white rice. Asians
> are unabashedly unoriginal when it comes to cooking rice.


Actually the congee/juk/jook would be the variation that might be
cooked in a mild weak broth, often fish based dashi in Japan but lots
of variation. I can't think of another but there might be?

Carol

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Bolt Lits AG wrote in rec.food.cooking:

> On 2/12/2016 12:11 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
>
> > Asians don't ever cook rice in any kind of broth. I suppose some
> > might but I've never seen it happen.

>
> How far does one plumb to find the depths of your ignorance, anyway?
>
> "A breakfast and lunch staple in many Asian countries and a mainstay
> at the dim sum hall, congee is rice and water (or broth) cooked down
> into a thick porridge."
>
> http://www.seriouseats.com/2014/09/d...y-comforting-c
> ongee.html
>
> No wonder you get the kind of abuse heaped on you that you do here.
>
> Please consider quitting entirely.


Actully the only congee/juk/jook I had in Hawaii was made from plain
cooked rice and the broth was added later.

Some asian versions use no broth at all, it's just rice and water (poor
man's congee) made from last nights leftover rice with hot water added
and mashed a bit.

Web crawling for fancy versions of things, doesnt change the basics
used in a regular home elsewhere.

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Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:

>
> "cshenk" > wrote in message
> ...
> > Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:
> >
> > >
> >>"cshenk" > wrote in message
> > > ...
> >>> Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:
> > > >
> >>> >
> > wrote in message
> >>> > ...
> >>>>> I like canned spanish rice.
> >>> >
> >>> > I bought some many years ago that was good. Can't remember the
> >>> > brand or where I was living when I bought it. But the only kind
> >>> > I can find now in a can isn't good.
> > > >
> >>> I have never noticed canned rice. Could be they don't sell it
> >>> here. I do recall a rather nice small can at HEB in San Antonio
> >>> Texas that was a premade 'spanish rice' seasonings. You added it
> >>> to cooked rice.
> > > >
> >>> Fortunately for me I have a rice machine (small unit) so even if I
> >>> don't feel like cooking, that one is easy. If I'm really lazy, I
> >>> ask my daughter to make it (grin).
> > >
> > > I most likely bought it at the military commissary and as I'm sure
> > > you know, they often sell things that you can't get elsewhere.
> > > But how can you do Spanish rice in a rice machine? How would you
> > > brown it?

> >
> > Smile, you make the rice then brown it if that particular recipe
> > calls for browning at all. Fact is there are so many varieties of
> > 'spanish or mexican rice' that it's very possible you are used to
> > making it almost rice-a-roni ish where you brown the rice in butter
> > then add the water and seasonings?

>
> That makes no sense. The rice should be browned before cooking for
> Spanish rice. And I don't use butter but olive oil. But yes, that
> is how it should be done.


Julie, just because you havent seen it, doesn't make it so. You are
doing pilaf. I am not. Nuff said?

> > Others use fresh cooked rice which is then lightly stir fried in
> > butter and olive oil then added spices and tomatoes are added.

>
> Have never ever seen such a recipe. Never.


Want to see one? Or want to deny they exist? Choice is yours.


> > A simple sort that is soft and works well is to make a batch of rice
> > (you'd want about 3 cups yield at least) then add Ro-Tel (or a store
> > knock off) and heat then serve. Some heat the ro-tel separate in
> > the microwave then use it to top the rice. While not haute
> > cuisine, it's simple and fast and in your house may be more
> > effective since people could chose to top the rice with that or
> > something else.

>
> No thanks. That is not how I make it at all. Actually I don't make
> it at all now since I was the only one who really liked it. And I
> can't have rice now. For me, Spanish rice has meat in it and is a
> meal. Mexican rice shouldn't have any chunks of stuff in it. Unless
> of course you are doing something like cilantro lime rice.


???? Wierd. I've not seen a spanish rice with meat in it unless it was
highly americanized or trying to pretend to be a mix of asian shrimp
fried rice with tomato topping..
Carol


--

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On 2/12/2016 2:31 PM, cshenk wrote:
> dsi1 wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>
>> On Friday, February 12, 2016 at 8:50:16 AM UTC-10, Brooklyn1 wrote:
>>> On Thu, 11 Feb 2016 20:50:07 -0700, Janet B >
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>> On Thu, 11 Feb 2016 19:51:40 -0600, "cshenk" >
>>> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> "cshenk" > wrote in message
>>>>>> ...
>>>>>>> Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> > wrote in message
>>>>>>>>
>>> ... >>>
>>>>>> I like canned spanish rice. >>> > >
>>>>>>>> I bought some many years ago that was good. Can't remember
>>> the >>> > > brand or where I was living when I bought it. But the
>>> only kind >>> > > I can find now in a can isn't good.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> I have never noticed canned rice. Could be they don't sell it
>>>>>>> here. I do recall a rather nice small can at HEB in San
>>> Antonio >>> > Texas that was a premade 'spanish rice' seasonings.
>>> You added it >>> > to cooked rice.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Fortunately for me I have a rice machine (small unit) so even
>>> if I >>> > don't feel like cooking, that one is easy. If I'm
>>> really lazy, I >>> > ask my daughter to make it (grin).
>>>>>>
>>>>>> I most likely bought it at the military commissary and as I'm
>>> sure >>> you know, they often sell things that you can't get
>>> elsewhere. But >>> how can you do Spanish rice in a rice machine?
>>> How would you brown >>> it?
>>>>>
>>>>> Smile, you make the rice then brown it if that particular
>>>>> recipe calls for browning at all. Fact is there are so many
>>>>> varieties of 'spanish or mexican rice' that it's very possible
>>>>> you are used to making it almost rice-a-roni ish where you
>>>>> brown the rice in butter then add the water and seasonings?
>>>>>
>>>>> Others use fresh cooked rice which is then lightly stir fried
>>>>> in butter and olive oil then added spices and tomatoes are
>>>>> added.
>>>>>
>>>>> A simple sort that is soft and works well is to make a batch of
>>>>> rice (you'd want about 3 cups yield at least) then add Ro-Tel
>>>>> (or a store knock off) and heat then serve. Some heat the
>>>>> ro-tel separate in the microwave then use it to top the rice.
>>>>> While not haute cuisine, it's simple and fast and in your house
>>>>> may be more effective since people could chose to top the rice
>>>>> with that or something else.
>>>>
>>>> The dish is a pilaf and is thousands of years old. Pilaf exists
>>>> every where in the world and is made according to local
>>>> traditions Generally the basics are rice is 'browned' in a fat,
>>>> cooked in a broth and meats/vegetables are added. Rice a Roni, a
>>>> rice and pasta dish is still a pilaf.
>>>> Janet US
>>>
>>> Pilaf is one of the most widely consumed dishes on the planet, most
>>> every ethnicity has a basic version, frying the grains is not
>>> manditory, most ethnicities do ny fry the rice prior to adding
>>> liquid, in fact most rice that's fried is fried after cooking in
>>> liquid, as in Chinese Fly Lice which is technically a pilaf.
>>> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pilaf

>>
>> Asians don't ever cook rice in any kind of broth. I suppose some
>> might but I've never seen it happen. Fried rice is prepared with
>> pre-cooked white rice. I suppose some trendy restaurants might use
>> brown rice but I've never seen it. There is jook, which is a popular
>> soup made with rice but it's always made cooked white rice. Asians
>> are unabashedly unoriginal when it comes to cooking rice.

>
> Actually the congee/juk/jook would be the variation that might be
> cooked in a mild weak broth, often fish based dashi in Japan but lots
> of variation. I can't think of another but there might be?
>
> Carol
>


What I meant is that the rice can be cooked in a broth but the rice is
pre-cooked the regular way first. Cooking raw rice in a stock is not
something I've heard of.

I have made jook before and I use leftover rice. I use chicken broth but
my guess is that some people use fish stock. Chicken stock is a very
Chinese way to make jook. The interesting thing about jook is that the
rice on the bottom has a most wonderful taste. Slightly scorching the
rice with soup stock produces something truly amazing. I've always made
jook when I've had a leftover chicken/turkey carcass and rice. From
these humble ingredients comes something sublime.

As far as fried rice is concerned, calling fried rice a pilaf is an
insult to two great dishes. We're quite serious about fried rice over
here. Kim chee fried rice is a most wonderful dish.

http://www.bubbleworld.ca/resources/upload/DSC0043.jpg


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On 2/12/2016 2:36 PM, cshenk wrote:
> Bolt Lits AG wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>
>> On 2/12/2016 12:11 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
>>
>>> Asians don't ever cook rice in any kind of broth. I suppose some
>>> might but I've never seen it happen.

>>
>> How far does one plumb to find the depths of your ignorance, anyway?
>>
>> "A breakfast and lunch staple in many Asian countries and a mainstay
>> at the dim sum hall, congee is rice and water (or broth) cooked down
>> into a thick porridge."
>>
>> http://www.seriouseats.com/2014/09/d...y-comforting-c
>> ongee.html
>>
>> No wonder you get the kind of abuse heaped on you that you do here.
>>
>> Please consider quitting entirely.

>
> Actully the only congee/juk/jook I had in Hawaii was made from plain
> cooked rice and the broth was added later.
>
> Some asian versions use no broth at all, it's just rice and water (poor
> man's congee) made from last nights leftover rice with hot water added
> and mashed a bit.
>
> Web crawling for fancy versions of things, doesnt change the basics
> used in a regular home elsewhere.
>


Rice with hot tea poured on it is a popular thing to eat with the old
folks. I've never gotten a taste for it - it's a pretty old-school thing
to do. My guess is they'll still do that in Japan.
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On Fri, 12 Feb 2016 10:30:40 -1000, dsi1
> wrote:

>On 2/12/2016 10:11 AM, Julie Bove wrote:
>>
>> "dsi1" > wrote in message
>> ...
>> On Friday, February 12, 2016 at 8:50:16 AM UTC-10, Brooklyn1 wrote:
>>> On Thu, 11 Feb 2016 20:50:07 -0700, Janet B >
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>> >On Thu, 11 Feb 2016 19:51:40 -0600, "cshenk" > wrote:
>>> >
>>> >>Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>>> >>
>>> >>>
>>> >>> "cshenk" > wrote in message
>>> >>> ...
>>> >>> > Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>>> >>> >
>>> >>> > >
>>> >>> > wrote in message
>>> >>> > > ...
>>> >>> >>> I like canned spanish rice.
>>> >>> > >
>>> >>> > > I bought some many years ago that was good. Can't remember the
>>> >>> > > brand or where I was living when I bought it. But the only kind
>>> >>> > > I can find now in a can isn't good.
>>> >>> >
>>> >>> > I have never noticed canned rice. Could be they don't sell it
>>> >>> > here. I *do* recall a rather nice small can at HEB in San Antonio
>>> >>> > Texas that was a premade 'spanish rice' seasonings. You added it
>>> >>> > to cooked rice.
>>> >>> >
>>> >>> > Fortunately for me I have a rice machine (small unit) so even if I
>>> >>> > don't feel like cooking, that one is easy. If I'm really lazy, I
>>> >>> > ask my daughter to make it (grin).
>>> >>>
>>> >>> I most likely bought it at the military commissary and as I'm sure
>>> >>> you know, they often sell things that you can't get elsewhere. But
>>> >>> how can you do Spanish rice in a rice machine? How would you brown
>>> >>> it?
>>> >>
>>> >>Smile, you make the rice then brown it if that particular recipe calls
>>> >>for browning at all. Fact is there are so many varieties of 'spanish
>>> >>or mexican rice' that it's very possible you are used to making it
>>> >>almost rice-a-roni ish where you brown the rice in butter then add the
>>> >>water and seasonings?
>>> >>
>>> >>Others use fresh cooked rice which is then lightly stir fried in butter
>>> >>and olive oil then added spices and tomatoes are added.
>>> >>
>>> >>A simple sort that is soft and works well is to make a batch of rice
>>> >>(you'd want about 3 cups yield at least) then add Ro-Tel (or a store
>>> >>knock off) and heat then serve. Some heat the ro-tel separate in the
>>> >>microwave then use it to top the rice. While not haute cuisine, it's
>>> >>simple and fast and in your house may be more effective since people
>>> >>could chose to top the rice with that or something else.
>>> >
>>> >The dish is a pilaf and is thousands of years old. Pilaf exists every
>>> >where in the world and is made according to local traditions Generally
>>> >the basics are rice is 'browned' in a fat, cooked in a broth and
>>> >meats/vegetables are added. Rice a Roni, a rice and pasta dish is
>>> >still a pilaf.
>>> >Janet US
>>>
>>> Pilaf is one of the most widely consumed dishes on the planet, most
>>> every ethnicity has a basic version, frying the grains is not
>>> manditory, most ethnicities do ny fry the rice prior to adding liquid,
>>> in fact most rice that's fried is fried after cooking in liquid, as in
>>> Chinese Fly Lice which is technically a pilaf.
>>> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pilaf

>>
>> Asians don't ever cook rice in any kind of broth. I suppose some might
>> but I've never seen it happen. Fried rice is prepared with pre-cooked
>> white rice. I suppose some trendy restaurants might use brown rice but
>> I've never seen it. There is jook, which is a popular soup made with
>> rice but it's always made cooked white rice. Asians are unabashedly
>> unoriginal when it comes to cooking rice.
>>
>> ---
>>
>> Some Asian places here do offer brown rice or even brown fried rice but
>> they are the Americanized places. Asians don't put salt or fat in the
>> rice either. My friend was horrified when I told her how I made rice as
>> she only ever makes the Japanese style.

>
>Asians would be surprised to learn that some Westerners don't wash their
>rice before cooking. It's just not in my DNA to follow that practice.


Thats because rice grown in the US is clean, imported rice is
disgustingly filthy with human and other animal excrement. I won't
buy imported rice. Asians are the most disgustingly filthy people on
this planet... the vast majority of Asians go from birth to grave
without ever bathing.
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On 2/12/2016 3:50 PM, Brooklyn1 wrote:
> On Fri, 12 Feb 2016 10:30:40 -1000, dsi1
> > wrote:
>
>> On 2/12/2016 10:11 AM, Julie Bove wrote:
>>>
>>> "dsi1" > wrote in message
>>> ...
>>> On Friday, February 12, 2016 at 8:50:16 AM UTC-10, Brooklyn1 wrote:
>>>> On Thu, 11 Feb 2016 20:50:07 -0700, Janet B >
>>>> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> On Thu, 11 Feb 2016 19:51:40 -0600, "cshenk" > wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>> Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> "cshenk" > wrote in message
>>>>>>> ...
>>>>>>>> Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> > wrote in message
>>>>>>>>> ...
>>>>>>>>>> I like canned spanish rice.
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> I bought some many years ago that was good. Can't remember the
>>>>>>>>> brand or where I was living when I bought it. But the only kind
>>>>>>>>> I can find now in a can isn't good.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> I have never noticed canned rice. Could be they don't sell it
>>>>>>>> here. I *do* recall a rather nice small can at HEB in San Antonio
>>>>>>>> Texas that was a premade 'spanish rice' seasonings. You added it
>>>>>>>> to cooked rice.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Fortunately for me I have a rice machine (small unit) so even if I
>>>>>>>> don't feel like cooking, that one is easy. If I'm really lazy, I
>>>>>>>> ask my daughter to make it (grin).
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> I most likely bought it at the military commissary and as I'm sure
>>>>>>> you know, they often sell things that you can't get elsewhere. But
>>>>>>> how can you do Spanish rice in a rice machine? How would you brown
>>>>>>> it?
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Smile, you make the rice then brown it if that particular recipe calls
>>>>>> for browning at all. Fact is there are so many varieties of 'spanish
>>>>>> or mexican rice' that it's very possible you are used to making it
>>>>>> almost rice-a-roni ish where you brown the rice in butter then add the
>>>>>> water and seasonings?
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Others use fresh cooked rice which is then lightly stir fried in butter
>>>>>> and olive oil then added spices and tomatoes are added.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> A simple sort that is soft and works well is to make a batch of rice
>>>>>> (you'd want about 3 cups yield at least) then add Ro-Tel (or a store
>>>>>> knock off) and heat then serve. Some heat the ro-tel separate in the
>>>>>> microwave then use it to top the rice. While not haute cuisine, it's
>>>>>> simple and fast and in your house may be more effective since people
>>>>>> could chose to top the rice with that or something else.
>>>>>
>>>>> The dish is a pilaf and is thousands of years old. Pilaf exists every
>>>>> where in the world and is made according to local traditions Generally
>>>>> the basics are rice is 'browned' in a fat, cooked in a broth and
>>>>> meats/vegetables are added. Rice a Roni, a rice and pasta dish is
>>>>> still a pilaf.
>>>>> Janet US
>>>>
>>>> Pilaf is one of the most widely consumed dishes on the planet, most
>>>> every ethnicity has a basic version, frying the grains is not
>>>> manditory, most ethnicities do ny fry the rice prior to adding liquid,
>>>> in fact most rice that's fried is fried after cooking in liquid, as in
>>>> Chinese Fly Lice which is technically a pilaf.
>>>> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pilaf
>>>
>>> Asians don't ever cook rice in any kind of broth. I suppose some might
>>> but I've never seen it happen. Fried rice is prepared with pre-cooked
>>> white rice. I suppose some trendy restaurants might use brown rice but
>>> I've never seen it. There is jook, which is a popular soup made with
>>> rice but it's always made cooked white rice. Asians are unabashedly
>>> unoriginal when it comes to cooking rice.
>>>
>>> ---
>>>
>>> Some Asian places here do offer brown rice or even brown fried rice but
>>> they are the Americanized places. Asians don't put salt or fat in the
>>> rice either. My friend was horrified when I told her how I made rice as
>>> she only ever makes the Japanese style.

>>
>> Asians would be surprised to learn that some Westerners don't wash their
>> rice before cooking. It's just not in my DNA to follow that practice.

>
> Thats because rice grown in the US is clean, imported rice is
> disgustingly filthy with human and other animal excrement. I won't
> buy imported rice. Asians are the most disgustingly filthy people on
> this planet... the vast majority of Asians go from birth to grave
> without ever bathing.
>


Man, I love this place!
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On Fri, 12 Feb 2016 15:36:44 -1000, dsi1 > wrote:
snip
>
>As far as fried rice is concerned, calling fried rice a pilaf is an
>insult to two great dishes. We're quite serious about fried rice over
>here. Kim chee fried rice is a most wonderful dish.
>
>http://www.bubbleworld.ca/resources/upload/DSC0043.jpg


Just in case you think I said that fried rice was a pilaf, no, I did
not. Nor did I imply so.
Janet US
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On 2/12/2016 4:05 PM, Janet B wrote:
> On Fri, 12 Feb 2016 15:36:44 -1000, dsi1 > wrote:
> snip
>>
>> As far as fried rice is concerned, calling fried rice a pilaf is an
>> insult to two great dishes. We're quite serious about fried rice over
>> here. Kim chee fried rice is a most wonderful dish.
>>
>> http://www.bubbleworld.ca/resources/upload/DSC0043.jpg

>
> Just in case you think I said that fried rice was a pilaf, no, I did
> not. Nor did I imply so.
> Janet US
>


Let's face it, there's not many people that would boldly state that
fried rice is a pilaf - even on a technicality. OTOH, I suppose
technically, a rat is the same as a polar bear. Topologically speaking,
of course.
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