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Old 02-04-2012, 08:49 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Lining a lazy Susan cupboard

I have two of those lazy Susan type cupboards where the roundish shelves
just sort of go around and around. The cupboard is not a complete circle.
I had previously lined them with white Contact paper but that didn't work so
well. I couldn't get a piece that was the right size so I wound up piecing
some together. It looked like crap. I decided to remove the paper in the
flour cupboard after I discovered the weevils. That cupboard has since had
pretty much everything replaced except for the salt.

The other cupboard has mainly canned goods but the liner is old looking and
starting to rip.

I have bought some of that spongy liner with the holes in it in the hopes
that it will keep things from sliding. One problem I've had is stuff flying
off the sides as the shelves spin around.

But how to cut it? This might be easier to install because it is more
flexible. I had purchased some white liner online that just didn't work at
all. It was very stiff and slick and even when cut in pieces there turned
out not to be enough of it. I am not sure the stuff I have now is big
enough to be able to put just one piece in. I don't really know how to
explain it but the curved design is baffling me. Also the fact that I can't
access the entire cupboard at once. I can only get to like...half of it or
so.

Any ideas? Or hmmm... Maybe I could pay my nephew to do the lining for me.
He's had a heck of a lot more math than I have.



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Old 02-04-2012, 03:18 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Lining a lazy Susan cupboard

On Mon, 2 Apr 2012 00:49:52 -0700, "Julie Bove"
wrote:

I have two of those lazy Susan type cupboards where the roundish shelves
just sort of go around and around. The cupboard is not a complete circle.
I had previously lined them with white Contact paper but that didn't work so
well. I couldn't get a piece that was the right size so I wound up piecing
some together. It looked like crap. I decided to remove the paper in the
flour cupboard after I discovered the weevils. That cupboard has since had
pretty much everything replaced except for the salt.

The other cupboard has mainly canned goods but the liner is old looking and
starting to rip.

I have bought some of that spongy liner with the holes in it in the hopes
that it will keep things from sliding. One problem I've had is stuff flying
off the sides as the shelves spin around.

But how to cut it? This might be easier to install because it is more
flexible. I had purchased some white liner online that just didn't work at
all. It was very stiff and slick and even when cut in pieces there turned
out not to be enough of it. I am not sure the stuff I have now is big
enough to be able to put just one piece in. I don't really know how to
explain it but the curved design is baffling me. Also the fact that I can't
access the entire cupboard at once. I can only get to like...half of it or
so.

Any ideas? Or hmmm... Maybe I could pay my nephew to do the lining for me.
He's had a heck of a lot more math than I have.


Lazy susans in corner cabinets are a waste of space and schmutz
collectors, especially underneath... get rid of them. I use one of
those grocer's friends to reach into the far recesses of corner
cabinets... a good place to store paper products.
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Old 02-04-2012, 03:31 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Lining a lazy Susan cupboard


"Bull" wrote in message
...
In article ,
"Julie Bove" wrote:

I have two of those lazy Susan type cupboards where the roundish shelves
just sort of go around and around. The cupboard is not a complete
circle.
I had previously lined them with white Contact paper but that didn't work
so
well. I couldn't get a piece that was the right size so I wound up
piecing
some together. It looked like crap. I decided to remove the paper in
the
flour cupboard after I discovered the weevils. That cupboard has since
had
pretty much everything replaced except for the salt.

The other cupboard has mainly canned goods but the liner is old looking
and
starting to rip.

I have bought some of that spongy liner with the holes in it in the hopes
that it will keep things from sliding. One problem I've had is stuff
flying
off the sides as the shelves spin around.

But how to cut it? This might be easier to install because it is more
flexible. I had purchased some white liner online that just didn't work
at
all. It was very stiff and slick and even when cut in pieces there
turned
out not to be enough of it. I am not sure the stuff I have now is big
enough to be able to put just one piece in. I don't really know how to
explain it but the curved design is baffling me. Also the fact that I
can't
access the entire cupboard at once. I can only get to like...half of it
or
so.

Any ideas? Or hmmm... Maybe I could pay my nephew to do the lining for
me.
He's had a heck of a lot more math than I have.


I made a pattern. Cut the liner like the pattern and fit. If the
material isn't large enough make a butt seam and tape it on the
underside. (I used packing tape) Install fitted liner.


But how do you make the pattern? What is it made of and how do you do it?


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Old 02-04-2012, 03:33 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Lining a lazy Susan cupboard


"Brooklyn1" Gravesend1 wrote in message
...
On Mon, 2 Apr 2012 00:49:52 -0700, "Julie Bove"
wrote:

I have two of those lazy Susan type cupboards where the roundish shelves
just sort of go around and around. The cupboard is not a complete circle.
I had previously lined them with white Contact paper but that didn't work
so
well. I couldn't get a piece that was the right size so I wound up
piecing
some together. It looked like crap. I decided to remove the paper in the
flour cupboard after I discovered the weevils. That cupboard has since
had
pretty much everything replaced except for the salt.

The other cupboard has mainly canned goods but the liner is old looking
and
starting to rip.

I have bought some of that spongy liner with the holes in it in the hopes
that it will keep things from sliding. One problem I've had is stuff
flying
off the sides as the shelves spin around.

But how to cut it? This might be easier to install because it is more
flexible. I had purchased some white liner online that just didn't work
at
all. It was very stiff and slick and even when cut in pieces there turned
out not to be enough of it. I am not sure the stuff I have now is big
enough to be able to put just one piece in. I don't really know how to
explain it but the curved design is baffling me. Also the fact that I
can't
access the entire cupboard at once. I can only get to like...half of it
or
so.

Any ideas? Or hmmm... Maybe I could pay my nephew to do the lining for
me.
He's had a heck of a lot more math than I have.


Lazy susans in corner cabinets are a waste of space and schmutz
collectors, especially underneath... get rid of them. I use one of
those grocer's friends to reach into the far recesses of corner
cabinets... a good place to store paper products.


I would love to get rid of them but I can't afford to redo my kitchen. I
don't even have room to store paper products in the kitchen. They are in
the garage. I do have a small pullout cabinet to store things like plastic
bags. I freaking hate those pullouts too but all of my lower cabinets are
those. Things fall behind just as they fly off the shelves of the lazy
Susan. I just ordered some new reaching tools. It is hard for me to get
back there.


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Old 02-04-2012, 05:12 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Lining a lazy Susan cupboard

On 4/2/2012 8:33 AM, Julie Bove wrote:
I would love to get rid of them but I can't afford to redo my kitchen. I
don't even have room to store paper products in the kitchen. They are in
the garage. I do have a small pullout cabinet to store things like plastic
bags. I freaking hate those pullouts too but all of my lower cabinets are
those. Things fall behind just as they fly off the shelves of the lazy
Susan. I just ordered some new reaching tools. It is hard for me to get
back there.



Why do things "fly off the shelves"? How hard to you spin the damned
thing? I've dealt with those corner cupboard lazy susan things in my
parents' homes and my siblings' homes, and I had them in one of my
kitchens once, and I've not experienced anything flying off. Falling
over, yes, but never falling off or flying anywhere.


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Old 02-04-2012, 05:33 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 3,166
Default Lining a lazy Susan cupboard

On Mon, 2 Apr 2012 07:31:07 -0700, "Julie Bove"
wrote:


"Bull" wrote in message
...
In article ,
"Julie Bove" wrote:

I have two of those lazy Susan type cupboards where the roundish shelves
just sort of go around and around. The cupboard is not a complete
circle.
I had previously lined them with white Contact paper but that didn't work
so
well. I couldn't get a piece that was the right size so I wound up
piecing
some together. It looked like crap. I decided to remove the paper in
the
flour cupboard after I discovered the weevils. That cupboard has since
had
pretty much everything replaced except for the salt.

The other cupboard has mainly canned goods but the liner is old looking
and
starting to rip.

I have bought some of that spongy liner with the holes in it in the hopes
that it will keep things from sliding. One problem I've had is stuff
flying
off the sides as the shelves spin around.

But how to cut it? This might be easier to install because it is more
flexible. I had purchased some white liner online that just didn't work
at
all. It was very stiff and slick and even when cut in pieces there
turned
out not to be enough of it. I am not sure the stuff I have now is big
enough to be able to put just one piece in. I don't really know how to
explain it but the curved design is baffling me. Also the fact that I
can't
access the entire cupboard at once. I can only get to like...half of it
or
so.

Any ideas? Or hmmm... Maybe I could pay my nephew to do the lining for
me.
He's had a heck of a lot more math than I have.


I made a pattern. Cut the liner like the pattern and fit. If the
material isn't large enough make a butt seam and tape it on the
underside. (I used packing tape) Install fitted liner.


But how do you make the pattern? What is it made of and how do you do it?

Measure from the axis to the end of the circle. Take a strip of paper
or cardboard and use a thumb tack to hold the axis and poke a hole at
the measured end and use a pencil through the hole to trace it on your
material. You'll need to trim it out at the axle.

Lou







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Old 02-04-2012, 05:34 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Lining a lazy Susan cupboard

On Mon, 2 Apr 2012 07:33:25 -0700, "Julie Bove"
wrote:


"Brooklyn1" Gravesend1 wrote in message
.. .
On Mon, 2 Apr 2012 00:49:52 -0700, "Julie Bove"
wrote:

I have two of those lazy Susan type cupboards where the roundish shelves
just sort of go around and around. The cupboard is not a complete circle.
I had previously lined them with white Contact paper but that didn't work
so
well. I couldn't get a piece that was the right size so I wound up
piecing
some together. It looked like crap. I decided to remove the paper in the
flour cupboard after I discovered the weevils. That cupboard has since
had
pretty much everything replaced except for the salt.

The other cupboard has mainly canned goods but the liner is old looking
and
starting to rip.

I have bought some of that spongy liner with the holes in it in the hopes
that it will keep things from sliding. One problem I've had is stuff
flying
off the sides as the shelves spin around.

But how to cut it? This might be easier to install because it is more
flexible. I had purchased some white liner online that just didn't work
at
all. It was very stiff and slick and even when cut in pieces there turned
out not to be enough of it. I am not sure the stuff I have now is big
enough to be able to put just one piece in. I don't really know how to
explain it but the curved design is baffling me. Also the fact that I
can't
access the entire cupboard at once. I can only get to like...half of it
or
so.

Any ideas? Or hmmm... Maybe I could pay my nephew to do the lining for
me.
He's had a heck of a lot more math than I have.


Lazy susans in corner cabinets are a waste of space and schmutz
collectors, especially underneath... get rid of them. I use one of
those grocer's friends to reach into the far recesses of corner
cabinets... a good place to store paper products.


I would love to get rid of them but I can't afford to redo my kitchen.


There is no kitchen redoing. It should be very easy to remove the
lazy susan, all you need is a screw driver and someone who can reach
into the cabinet to remove the bracket at the top, then the whole
assembly lifts out so you can remove the bottom bracket, or just leave
it there... I'd reattach the top bracket as well so it doesn't get
misplaced in case someone wants to reinstall the lazy susan.



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Old 02-04-2012, 05:47 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Lining a lazy Susan cupboard

On 4/2/2012 10:31 AM, Julie Bove wrote:
wrote in message


In ,
"Julie wrote:


out not to be enough of it. I am not sure the stuff I have now is big
enough to be able to put just one piece in. I don't really know how to
explain it but the curved design is baffling me. Also the fact that I
can't
access the entire cupboard at once. I can only get to like...half of it
or
so.

Any ideas? Or hmmm... Maybe I could pay my nephew to do the lining for
me.
He's had a heck of a lot more math than I have.


I made a pattern. Cut the liner like the pattern and fit. If the
material isn't large enough make a butt seam and tape it on the
underside. (I used packing tape) Install fitted liner.


But how do you make the pattern? What is it made of and how do you do it?


I used newspaper. I don't remember if I had to tape a couple of
sheets together to cover the whole area. Then I just folded the
newspaper along the edges until it was the shape I wanted.

I lined my lazy susan shelves with vinyl flooring. Very sturdy
and I take it out and scrub it once a year or so.

nancy
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Old 02-04-2012, 06:31 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Lining a lazy Susan cupboard


On 4/2/2012 10:31 AM, Julie Bove wrote:


But how do you make the pattern? What is it made of and how do you do it?


Use a double-page of newspaper. If your newspaper is too small tape two
sheets together.

You need some string, a pencil and a tape measure or ruler. Tie the
pencil onto one eld of the string.

Measure the width of your lazy susan across the middle. That's the
diameter of the circle. The radius of the circle is half the diameter. Cut
the string to half the diameter.

Put the cut end in the middle of the paper, hold it with one finger.
With the other hand, hold the string taut and the pencil straight and use
it to draw a circle. Cut it out. That;s your pattern.

If your Lazy susan has a centre spindle you'll need a centre cut out on
the patternpaper to fit round it. Fold your paper circle in half, then in
quarters, and cut off the point. Now cut a straight line from the centre
hole to one edge of the circle. Lay your paper pattern on the lazy susan
to check it's a good fit.

Janet
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Old 02-04-2012, 07:48 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Lining a lazy Susan cupboard

On Apr 2, 9:31*am, "Julie Bove" wrote:
"Bull" wrote in message

...









In article ,
"Julie Bove" wrote:


I have two of those lazy Susan type cupboards where the roundish shelves
just sort of go around and around. *The cupboard is not a complete
circle.
I had previously lined them with white Contact paper but that didn't work
so
well. *I couldn't get a piece that was the right size so I wound up
piecing
some together. *It looked like crap. *I decided to remove the paper in
the
flour cupboard after I discovered the weevils. *That cupboard has since
had
pretty much everything replaced except for the salt.


The other cupboard has mainly canned goods but the liner is old looking
and
starting to rip.


I have bought some of that spongy liner with the holes in it in the hopes
that it will keep things from sliding. *One problem I've had is stuff
flying
off the sides as the shelves spin around.


But how to cut it? *This might be easier to install because it is more
flexible. *I had purchased some white liner online that just didn't work
at
all. *It was very stiff and slick and even when cut in pieces there
turned
out not to be enough of it. *I am not sure the stuff I have now is big
enough to be able to put just one piece in. *I don't really know how to
explain it but the curved design is baffling me. *Also the fact that I
can't
access the entire cupboard at once. *I can only get to like...half of it
or
so.


Any ideas? *Or hmmm... *Maybe I could pay my nephew to do the lining for
me.
He's had a heck of a lot more math than I have.


I made a pattern. *Cut the liner like the pattern and fit. *If the
material isn't large enough make a butt seam and tape it on the
underside. (I used packing tape) *Install fitted liner.


But how do you make the pattern? *What is it made of and how do you do it?


Geez, Julie, it isn't rocket science - how do you make a pattern for
anything? You can access the curved edge of the shelf by turning it
around - just cut a bunch of pie-shaped pieces (use just one small
piece of newspaper to make one pie-shaped piece that has the proper
curvature on it) and tape them together to exactly fit the shelf. I
guess you would have to empty the shelf first. Duh.

N.


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Old 02-04-2012, 08:19 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Lining a lazy Susan cupboard

On Mon, 2 Apr 2012 18:31:50 +0100, Janet wrote:


On 4/2/2012 10:31 AM, Julie Bove wrote:


But how do you make the pattern? What is it made of and how do you do it?


Use a double-page of newspaper. If your newspaper is too small tape two
sheets together.

You need some string, a pencil and a tape measure or ruler. Tie the
pencil onto one eld of the string.

Measure the width of your lazy susan across the middle. That's the
diameter of the circle. The radius of the circle is half the diameter. Cut
the string to half the diameter.

Put the cut end in the middle of the paper, hold it with one finger.
With the other hand, hold the string taut and the pencil straight and use
it to draw a circle. Cut it out. That;s your pattern.

If your Lazy susan has a centre spindle you'll need a centre cut out on
the patternpaper to fit round it. Fold your paper circle in half, then in
quarters, and cut off the point. Now cut a straight line from the centre
hole to one edge of the circle. Lay your paper pattern on the lazy susan
to check it's a good fit.


Didn't you ever cut out paper valentine hearts and paper doilys in
kindergarten by folding and then cutting through all layers at once?

A couple lengths of butcher paper taped together to form a slightly
over sized square should do it... can fold the paper in half, in half
again, and in half once more to make a triangle, then measure from the
point the radius distance and cut on a tangent. Snip off the very
point to make an opening for the center post, open the sheet, tuck the
excess arcs under and tape to add strength, open one taped radius to
slip over the center post and retape and there you have it.
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Old 02-04-2012, 10:49 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Lining a lazy Susan cupboard

Pennyaline wrote:
On 4/2/2012 8:33 AM, Julie Bove wrote:
I would love to get rid of them but I can't afford to redo my
kitchen. I don't even have room to store paper products in the
kitchen. They are in the garage. I do have a small pullout cabinet
to store things like plastic bags. I freaking hate those pullouts
too but all of my lower cabinets are those. Things fall behind just
as they fly off the shelves of the lazy Susan. I just ordered some
new reaching tools. It is hard for me to get back there.



Why do things "fly off the shelves"? How hard to you spin the damned
thing? I've dealt with those corner cupboard lazy susan things in my
parents' homes and my siblings' homes, and I had them in one of my
kitchens once, and I've not experienced anything flying off. Falling
over, yes, but never falling off or flying anywhere.


There is nothing at the end to keep the items at the end on the shelf. So
they fly off. You have to use quite a lot of force to open them because
they stick very badly. Very poor design. My daughter likes to have them
closed and I prefer the look of them closed but feasibly I try to keep them
open because it is far less hassle.


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Old 02-04-2012, 10:49 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Lining a lazy Susan cupboard

Brooklyn1 wrote:
On Mon, 2 Apr 2012 07:33:25 -0700, "Julie Bove"
wrote:


"Brooklyn1" Gravesend1 wrote in message
...
On Mon, 2 Apr 2012 00:49:52 -0700, "Julie Bove"
wrote:

I have two of those lazy Susan type cupboards where the roundish
shelves just sort of go around and around. The cupboard is not a
complete circle. I had previously lined them with white Contact
paper but that didn't work so
well. I couldn't get a piece that was the right size so I wound up
piecing
some together. It looked like crap. I decided to remove the
paper in the flour cupboard after I discovered the weevils. That
cupboard has since had
pretty much everything replaced except for the salt.

The other cupboard has mainly canned goods but the liner is old
looking and
starting to rip.

I have bought some of that spongy liner with the holes in it in
the hopes that it will keep things from sliding. One problem I've
had is stuff flying
off the sides as the shelves spin around.

But how to cut it? This might be easier to install because it is
more flexible. I had purchased some white liner online that just
didn't work at
all. It was very stiff and slick and even when cut in pieces
there turned out not to be enough of it. I am not sure the stuff
I have now is big enough to be able to put just one piece in. I
don't really know how to explain it but the curved design is
baffling me. Also the fact that I can't
access the entire cupboard at once. I can only get to like...half
of it or
so.

Any ideas? Or hmmm... Maybe I could pay my nephew to do the
lining for me.
He's had a heck of a lot more math than I have.

Lazy susans in corner cabinets are a waste of space and schmutz
collectors, especially underneath... get rid of them. I use one of
those grocer's friends to reach into the far recesses of corner
cabinets... a good place to store paper products.


I would love to get rid of them but I can't afford to redo my
kitchen.


There is no kitchen redoing. It should be very easy to remove the
lazy susan, all you need is a screw driver and someone who can reach
into the cabinet to remove the bracket at the top, then the whole
assembly lifts out so you can remove the bottom bracket, or just leave
it there... I'd reattach the top bracket as well so it doesn't get
misplaced in case someone wants to reinstall the lazy susan.


But then I'd be left with a big gaping hole!


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Old 02-04-2012, 10:50 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Lining a lazy Susan cupboard

Bull wrote:
In article ,
"Julie Bove" wrote:

"Bull" wrote in message


But how do you make the pattern? What is it made of and how do you
do it?


The ones I have are a circle with a wedge cut out and have a lip all
the way around. Measure the diameter of the circle and cut one.
when you have the circle make a split to the center for the post.
Cut out the wedge. Tweak the pattern until it fits. Then trace to
the liner cut another one. Takes a little time but not that hard to
do. My house was built about 1990 and those were the thing then.
There are much better storage solutions today - but I'm not taking
mine out because I am never changing the cabinets. I know what's in
there and don't have a problem with it. It is way better than a
"dead space" corner. Mine are in the lower cabinets only.


How do I measure the diamater of the circle? I am not good with math. My
house was built in 81 but was probably remodeled around 90.


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Old 02-04-2012, 10:51 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Lou Decruss wrote:
On Mon, 2 Apr 2012 07:31:07 -0700, "Julie Bove"
wrote:


"Bull" wrote in message
...
In article ,
"Julie Bove" wrote:

I have two of those lazy Susan type cupboards where the roundish
shelves just sort of go around and around. The cupboard is not a
complete circle.
I had previously lined them with white Contact paper but that
didn't work so
well. I couldn't get a piece that was the right size so I wound up
piecing
some together. It looked like crap. I decided to remove the
paper in the
flour cupboard after I discovered the weevils. That cupboard has
since had
pretty much everything replaced except for the salt.

The other cupboard has mainly canned goods but the liner is old
looking and
starting to rip.

I have bought some of that spongy liner with the holes in it in
the hopes that it will keep things from sliding. One problem I've
had is stuff flying
off the sides as the shelves spin around.

But how to cut it? This might be easier to install because it is
more flexible. I had purchased some white liner online that just
didn't work at
all. It was very stiff and slick and even when cut in pieces there
turned
out not to be enough of it. I am not sure the stuff I have now is
big enough to be able to put just one piece in. I don't really
know how to explain it but the curved design is baffling me. Also
the fact that I can't
access the entire cupboard at once. I can only get to like...half
of it or
so.

Any ideas? Or hmmm... Maybe I could pay my nephew to do the
lining for me.
He's had a heck of a lot more math than I have.

I made a pattern. Cut the liner like the pattern and fit. If the
material isn't large enough make a butt seam and tape it on the
underside. (I used packing tape) Install fitted liner.


But how do you make the pattern? What is it made of and how do you
do it?

Measure from the axis to the end of the circle. Take a strip of paper
or cardboard and use a thumb tack to hold the axis and poke a hole at
the measured end and use a pencil through the hole to trace it on your
material. You'll need to trim it out at the axle.


What's an axis? I really am not good at math.




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