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Old 14-03-2010, 11:13 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Making a lattice pie crust - instructions


This is a good demonstration for the lattice novices among us,
including myself. I've always taken the lazy approach.

http://simplyrecipes.com/recipes/how...r_a_pie_crust/

Dora


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Old 15-03-2010, 01:17 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Making a lattice pie crust - instructions

In article ,
"Dora" wrote:

This is a good demonstration for the lattice novices among us,
including myself. I've always taken the lazy approach.

http://simplyrecipes.com/recipes/how...r_a_pie_crust/

Dora


Mom taught me how to do that, but I'm just not much of a baker. ;-)
Interestingly enough, the local grocery store bakers take the lazy
approach too for the apple pies. g See my Thanksgiving 2009 series.
--
Peace! Om

"Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
--Steve Rothstein

Web Albums: http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet

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Old 15-03-2010, 06:59 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Making a lattice pie crust - instructions

In news:rec.food.cooking, Omelet posted on Sun, 14
Mar 2010 19:17:38 -0600 the following:

Mom taught me how to do that, but I'm just not much of a baker. ;-)


I want to be more of a baker. I still want to perfect bread, but most of
the time, when I bake bread, it turns out to be very heavy and not
pleasant at all to eat. I want something that rises a LOT and turns out
very light.

Interestingly enough, the local grocery store bakers take the lazy
approach too for the apple pies. g See my Thanksgiving 2009 series.


I've made a few homemade pie crusts, but I just wish it wasn't so crumbly
if the raw crust gets too warm. Makes me think I might try rolling out my
next pie crust on waxed paper, then I'll put it in the fridge to chill it
before I lift it into the pie plate. Working with a crust that has warmed
isn't hard. It's getting it into the pie plate without tearing it that's
the hard part.

I swear, the most rewarding pie I ever baked was a pear pie I made using
pears I picked off our own tree, going homemade all the way. The crust,
and the stewed pears. I had just enough cornstarch in the filling to keep
it from running out from between the crusts when cut after a 15-minute
cooling. The glaze formed from the liquid had a perfect thickness that
coated my tongue without feeling sticky and without feeling like a mouth
full of drool. I was so happy with it. Oh, I also put a little
Buttershots liquer into the filling. I'm sure that helped.

Damaeus
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Old 15-03-2010, 07:50 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Making a lattice pie crust - instructions

In article ,
Damaeus wrote:

I swear, the most rewarding pie I ever baked was a pear pie I made using
pears I picked off our own tree, going homemade all the way. The crust,
and the stewed pears. I had just enough cornstarch in the filling to keep
it from running out from between the crusts when cut after a 15-minute
cooling. The glaze formed from the liquid had a perfect thickness that
coated my tongue without feeling sticky and without feeling like a mouth
full of drool. I was so happy with it. Oh, I also put a little
Buttershots liquer into the filling. I'm sure that helped.

Damaeus


Sounds really good! Got a recipe?
--
Peace! Om

"Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
--Steve Rothstein

Web Albums: http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet

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Old 15-03-2010, 08:55 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Making a lattice pie crust - instructions

In news:rec.food.cooking, Omelet posted on Mon, 15
Mar 2010 01:50:47 -0600 the following:

In article ,
Damaeus wrote:

I swear, the most rewarding pie I ever baked was a pear pie I made using
pears I picked off our own tree, going homemade all the way. The crust,
and the stewed pears. I had just enough cornstarch in the filling to keep
it from running out from between the crusts when cut after a 15-minute
cooling. The glaze formed from the liquid had a perfect thickness that
coated my tongue without feeling sticky and without feeling like a mouth
full of drool. I was so happy with it. Oh, I also put a little
Buttershots liquer into the filling. I'm sure that helped.

Damaeus


Sounds really good! Got a recipe?


No, I just made it up as I went along. I suppose whenever I do cook
something, I should start keeping track of exactly how much of everything
I put into it so when it turns out good, I can actually enter the recipe
in Mastercook or something. When I cook, I tend to just go by taste
instead of following a recipe, even if it's my own, original stuff.

So I don't have any proportions. I just know I put in pears, sugar,
filtered water, a stick of butter, buttershots, salt to taste. Then,
after the pears were tender, I made a cornstarch slurry and started adding
it until it was thick enough that it looked like it would hold together in
a piping hot, finished pie. Then I think I remember letting it cool off
so I could bake the pie with a raw crust without an already boiling hot
pie filling. Then I probably baked it at 375 degrees (cuz it's a nice,
middle-of-the-road temperature) until the crust looked done. I never even
had to use my pie crust rings I got for being able to make pumpkin pie
without burning the crust around the edges.

My pie holds together better than the frozen cobblers and pies from Mrs.
Smith. Cut her pies and the filling immediately avalanches into the
bottom of the pan. Mine didn't do that. It was pie, not a casserole.

Damaeus


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Old 15-03-2010, 11:29 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Making a lattice pie crust - instructions

In article ,
Damaeus wrote:

Sounds really good! Got a recipe?


No, I just made it up as I went along. I suppose whenever I do cook
something, I should start keeping track of exactly how much of everything
I put into it so when it turns out good, I can actually enter the recipe
in Mastercook or something. When I cook, I tend to just go by taste
instead of following a recipe, even if it's my own, original stuff.

So I don't have any proportions. I just know I put in pears, sugar,
filtered water, a stick of butter, buttershots, salt to taste. Then,
after the pears were tender, I made a cornstarch slurry and started adding
it until it was thick enough that it looked like it would hold together in
a piping hot, finished pie. Then I think I remember letting it cool off
so I could bake the pie with a raw crust without an already boiling hot
pie filling. Then I probably baked it at 375 degrees (cuz it's a nice,
middle-of-the-road temperature) until the crust looked done. I never even
had to use my pie crust rings I got for being able to make pumpkin pie
without burning the crust around the edges.

My pie holds together better than the frozen cobblers and pies from Mrs.
Smith. Cut her pies and the filling immediately avalanches into the
bottom of the pan. Mine didn't do that. It was pie, not a casserole.

Damaeus


That is the way most of us cook. :-) I, too, have been trying to track
down what I do when something turns out well. Either that or I just type
up what I put in it and don't put proportions. Since most people here do
that, it's been acceptable for the most part.
--
Peace! Om

"Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
--Steve Rothstein

Web Albums: http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet

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Old 15-03-2010, 03:59 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Making a lattice pie crust - instructions

On Mar 14, 6:13*pm, "Dora" wrote:
This is a good demonstration for the lattice novices among us,
including myself. *I've always taken the lazy approach.

http://simplyrecipes.com/recipes/how...top_for_a_pie_...

Dora


Making lattice tops is so easy, anyone can do it if they want....I
love to use a lattice top on fruit pies and on rhubarb, especially.

I also make a lattice topping for Austrian Linzer bars.

N.
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Old 15-03-2010, 05:21 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Making a lattice pie crust - instructions

from "Dora" contains these words:
http://simplyrecipes.com/recipes/how...r_a_pie_crust/


Here is a video, I like his technique.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BZtz-LPEhk8


Becca
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Old 15-03-2010, 11:27 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Making a lattice pie crust - instructions

In news:rec.food.cooking, Wayne Boatwright
posted on Mon, 15 Mar 2010 12:49:57 GMT
the following:

Just an observation, but IIRC, you mentioned cutting the pie after only
15 minutes of cooling and not have the filling run. At this point the
filling would still be hot. If it doesn't run at this temperature, when
it cools off, I can imagine that the consistency of the filling would be
like tar. Normally, fruit pies should be allowed to cool at least an
hour before cutting and serving, often longer.


Actually it wasn't like tar at all after it cooled. It was a little
thicker, but not by much, and that surprised me, too. And I like hot pie,
not lukewarm pie. I hate cold fruit pies.

Damaeus
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Old 16-03-2010, 01:02 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Making a lattice pie crust - instructions

In news:rec.food.cooking, Wayne Boatwright
posted on Tue, 16 Mar 2010 00:47:56 GMT
the following:

On Mon 15 Mar 2010 04:27:27p, Damaeus told us...

In news:rec.food.cooking, Wayne Boatwright
posted on Mon, 15 Mar 2010 12:49:57 GMT
the following:

Just an observation, but IIRC, you mentioned cutting the pie after
only 15 minutes of cooling and not have the filling run. At this
point the filling would still be hot. If it doesn't run at this
temperature, when it cools off, I can imagine that the consistency of
the filling would be like tar. Normally, fruit pies should be allowed
to cool at least an hour before cutting and serving, often longer.


Actually it wasn't like tar at all after it cooled. It was a little
thicker, but not by much, and that surprised me, too. And I like hot
pie, not lukewarm pie. I hate cold fruit pies.


I don't recall what kind of thickener you used. Flour, cornstarch,
tapioca? It may vary with type.


Cornstarch slurry. It didn't thicken as much in the fridge as I thought
it would. Maybe it has something to do with some kind of chemical
reaction between the pears, the water, the sugar, and liquer I used. Hehe.

Damaeus


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