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Old 06-02-2010, 08:03 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Sea salt fine grind

Is there anyway to make the coarse sea salt into a finer grind without
using a grinder, which I don't have. I just tried making fried rice
with sea salt but it does not seem to dissolve well.

Thank you in advance ...

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Old 06-02-2010, 08:20 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
aem aem is offline
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Default Sea salt fine grind

On Feb 6, 12:03 pm, " wrote:
Is there anyway to make the coarse sea salt into a finer grind without
using a grinder, which I don't have. I just tried making fried rice
with sea salt but it does not seem to dissolve well.


A tv chef this morning put sugar into her food processor to make it
finer grain. Perhaps the same would work for sea salt.

What does salt have to do with fried rice? -aem


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Old 06-02-2010, 08:42 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Sea salt fine grind

On Feb 6, 1:20*pm, aem wrote:

What does salt have to do with fried rice? * * -aem

I don't know what the standard recipe for fried rice calls for, but I
use soy sauce very lightly just enough to give it flavor and a streak
of color, and salt it to taste. Any other ideas?


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Old 06-02-2010, 09:32 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Sea salt fine grind

" wrote:

On Feb 6, 1:20 pm, aem wrote:

What does salt have to do with fried rice? -aem

I don't know what the standard recipe for fried rice calls for, but I
use soy sauce very lightly just enough to give it flavor and a streak
of color, and salt it to taste. Any other ideas?


Yeah. Just use more soy sauce.
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Old 06-02-2010, 09:33 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Sea salt fine grind

" wrote:

Is there anyway to make the coarse sea salt into a finer grind without
using a grinder, which I don't have. I just tried making fried rice
with sea salt but it does not seem to dissolve well.

Thank you in advance ...


Mortar and pestle.

How much is a pound of fine-grain salt these days?
Not more than 50 cents, right?
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Old 06-02-2010, 09:47 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Sea salt fine grind

In article
,
" wrote:

Is there anyway to make the coarse sea salt into a finer grind without
using a grinder, which I don't have. I just tried making fried rice
with sea salt but it does not seem to dissolve well.

Thank you in advance ...


Why not use regular salt for your fried rice? I seriously doubt you will
taste any difference between regular table salt and finely ground sea
salt in your fried rcie.


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Old 06-02-2010, 10:08 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Sea salt fine grind

Stan Horwitz wrote:

In article
,
" wrote:

Is there anyway to make the coarse sea salt into a finer grind
without using a grinder, which I don't have. I just tried making
fried rice with sea salt but it does not seem to dissolve well.

Thank you in advance ...


Why not use regular salt for your fried rice? I seriously doubt you
will taste any difference between regular table salt and finely
ground sea salt in your fried rcie.



Yup...and only fools buy "sea salt" anyways...in fact the term "sea salt" is
ridiculous as *all* salt is "sea salt", it's one of those silly terms a la'
"shrimp scampi".


--
Best
Greg


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Old 06-02-2010, 10:23 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Sea salt fine grind


"Gregory Morrow" wrote in message
m...
| Stan Horwitz wrote:
|
| In article
| ,
| " wrote:
|
| Is there anyway to make the coarse sea salt into a finer grind
| without using a grinder, which I don't have. I just tried making
| fried rice with sea salt but it does not seem to dissolve well.
|
| Thank you in advance ...
|
| Why not use regular salt for your fried rice? I seriously doubt you
| will taste any difference between regular table salt and finely
| ground sea salt in your fried rcie.
|
|
| Yup...and only fools buy "sea salt" anyways...in fact the term "sea salt" is
| ridiculous as *all* salt is "sea salt", it's one of those silly terms a la'
| "shrimp scampi".

Yeah. You'd better send an email out to Mayo Clinic correcting their
website. It's www.mayoclinic.com and just give them your credentials
and ask them to correct the article.:
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/sea-salt/AN01142

"Sea salt is produced through evaporation of seawater..."
"Table salt is mined from underground salt deposits..."

pavane



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Old 06-02-2010, 10:35 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Sea salt fine grind

pavane wrote:

| Why not use regular salt for your fried rice? I seriously doubt you
| will taste any difference between regular table salt and finely
| ground sea salt in your fried rcie.
|
|
| Yup...and only fools buy "sea salt" anyways...in fact the term "sea salt" is
| ridiculous as *all* salt is "sea salt", it's one of those silly terms a la'
| "shrimp scampi".

Yeah. You'd better send an email out to Mayo Clinic correcting their
website. It's www.mayoclinic.com and just give them your credentials
and ask them to correct the article.:
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/sea-salt/AN01142

"Sea salt is produced through evaporation of seawater..."
"Table salt is mined from underground salt deposits..."


There was a little more to that article. It said that sea salt is less
refined and has trace elements. It also said that table salt has
additives to prevent clumping. It also often has iodine added. FWIW, in
Canada, all table salt is iodized.

If you have salt water tropical fish you cannot used iodized salt. The
iodine will kill them.

It should be noted that the salt deposits that are mined are from
ancient oceans that dried up. It will seem that, since all ocean water
has basically the same elements dissolved in them, that salt deposits
would have those same elements in them. Some people can taste the
iodine in table salt.
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Old 06-02-2010, 11:40 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Sea salt fine grind

On Feb 6, 2:47*pm, Stan Horwitz wrote:

Why not use regular salt for your fried rice? I seriously doubt you will
taste any difference between regular table salt and finely ground sea
salt in your fried rice.

I read on the internet that the processing methods of the table salt
(mined salt) strips away the ingredients that balance the effect of
sodium on your body, whereas they are present in the sea salt. The
author states that even though the amount of those balancing
ingredients are very small, they have a measurable effect on your
body, and further suggests to switch sea salt for table salt for a
week if in doubt. So, this is the second day and the second meal.
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