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Old 27-01-2010, 05:52 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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I love the Italians. They're so human! Despite all DOP's and DOC's and
other bureaucratic attempts to codify wine and food products and,
amazingly, recipes, they manage to circumvent regulation. The following
article is typical of those I've seen coming out of Italy for decades
describing dilutions and "sophistications" of wine and food.

'Latest Italian Food Fraud Charge Involves Mozzarella
By NICK FOX
Italyıs agriculture minister ³said he had disbanded the consortium of
producers which guarantees buffalo mozzarella quality after routine
inspections had shown that even mozzarella produced by Luigi Chianese,
the consortiumıs president, had been Œwatered downı with cowıs milk,²
The Times of London reports.

The minister, Luca Zaia, said, ³In November, checks in major
supermarkets in Italy found that 25 percent of the cheese sold as
buffalo mozzarella was fake because it contained 30 percent cow milk.²

Itıs not the first scandal involving buffalo mozzarella. In 2008, some
was found to be contaminated with dioxin.' -from the New York Times

Another aspect of this kind of regulation is well expressed by Daziano
of the Italialicious food blog-

"In Italy, now thereıs a tendency to define the original and true recipe
of Italian staples: the original recipe of pesto Genovese, the true and
only one ragù alla Bolognese recipe, the ultimate Neapolitan pizza, and
so on. In its very conception, this search is a contradiction with the
soul of Italian cuisine. In fact, itıs impossible to choose only one
recipe because in Italy each region, each town, each village and each
mamma has their very own recipes."

There is a possible plus side to this but it will never be seen here in
the U.S. And that is consistency of menu terminology. For example, the
term 'Bolognese' is currently used for almost any pasta dish with sauce
containing tomatoes and meat. No, there's too much emphasis on novelty
and fashion in today's restaurants to be so banal as to serve truly
traditional dish.

D.M.

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Old 28-01-2010, 11:08 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default regulating food and wine names

On Tue, 26 Jan 2010 21:52:35 -0800, Don Martinich
wrote:




I love the Italians. They're so human! Despite all DOP's and DOC's and
other bureaucratic attempts to codify wine and food products and,
amazingly, recipes, they manage to circumvent regulation. The following
article is typical of those I've seen coming out of Italy for decades
describing dilutions and "sophistications" of wine and food.

'Latest Italian Food Fraud Charge Involves Mozzarella
By NICK FOX
Italyıs agriculture minister ³said he had disbanded the consortium of
producers which guarantees buffalo mozzarella quality after routine
inspections had shown that even mozzarella produced by Luigi Chianese,
the consortiumıs president, had been Œwatered downı with cowıs milk,²
The Times of London reports.

The minister, Luca Zaia, said, ³In November, checks in major
supermarkets in Italy found that 25 percent of the cheese sold as
buffalo mozzarella was fake because it contained 30 percent cow milk.²

Itıs not the first scandal involving buffalo mozzarella. In 2008, some
was found to be contaminated with dioxin.' -from the New York Times

Another aspect of this kind of regulation is well expressed by Daziano
of the Italialicious food blog-

"In Italy, now thereıs a tendency to define the original and true recipe
of Italian staples: the original recipe of pesto Genovese, the true and
only one ragù alla Bolognese recipe, the ultimate Neapolitan pizza, and
so on. In its very conception, this search is a contradiction with the
soul of Italian cuisine. In fact, itıs impossible to choose only one
recipe because in Italy each region, each town, each village and each
mamma has their very own recipes."

There is a possible plus side to this but it will never be seen here in
the U.S. And that is consistency of menu terminology. For example, the
term 'Bolognese' is currently used for almost any pasta dish with sauce
containing tomatoes and meat. No, there's too much emphasis on novelty
and fashion in today's restaurants to be so banal as to serve truly
traditional dish.

D.M.

FYI, we are trying to get the same exact thing for real & 100% Kona
Coffee. There is a International group Origin which wants the
geographic identity to be the name of the subject. Not as easy as you
may think!!

For Example----As posted in alt.coffee this morning: "A tea blend
can become the signature of one's style, or that of an entire
restaurant chain, in the same fashion as one might favor Kona coffee
over French Roast."

Egads, as another poster in a.c. said: "That's pretty sad.
(Favoring strawberries over bad copywriters)".

aloha,
Cea
PS In case you were not aware, French Roast is NOT a geographical
coffee- it's a roast profile and could be made with Kona...

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Old 29-01-2010, 01:53 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default regulating food and wine names

In article ,
pure kona wrote:

On Tue, 26 Jan 2010 21:52:35 -0800, Don Martinich
wrote:




I love the Italians. They're so human! Despite all DOP's and DOC's and
other bureaucratic attempts to codify wine and food products and,
amazingly, recipes, they manage to circumvent regulation. The following
article is typical of those I've seen coming out of Italy for decades
describing dilutions and "sophistications" of wine and food.

'Latest Italian Food Fraud Charge Involves Mozzarella
By NICK FOX
Italyıs agriculture minister ³said he had disbanded the consortium of
producers which guarantees buffalo mozzarella quality after routine
inspections had shown that even mozzarella produced by Luigi Chianese,
the consortiumıs president, had been Œwatered downı with cowıs milk,²
The Times of London reports.

The minister, Luca Zaia, said, ³In November, checks in major
supermarkets in Italy found that 25 percent of the cheese sold as
buffalo mozzarella was fake because it contained 30 percent cow milk.²

Itıs not the first scandal involving buffalo mozzarella. In 2008, some
was found to be contaminated with dioxin.' -from the New York Times

Another aspect of this kind of regulation is well expressed by Daziano
of the Italialicious food blog-

"In Italy, now thereıs a tendency to define the original and true recipe
of Italian staples: the original recipe of pesto Genovese, the true and
only one ragù alla Bolognese recipe, the ultimate Neapolitan pizza, and
so on. In its very conception, this search is a contradiction with the
soul of Italian cuisine. In fact, itıs impossible to choose only one
recipe because in Italy each region, each town, each village and each
mamma has their very own recipes."

There is a possible plus side to this but it will never be seen here in
the U.S. And that is consistency of menu terminology. For example, the
term 'Bolognese' is currently used for almost any pasta dish with sauce
containing tomatoes and meat. No, there's too much emphasis on novelty
and fashion in today's restaurants to be so banal as to serve truly
traditional dish.

D.M.

FYI, we are trying to get the same exact thing for real & 100% Kona
Coffee. There is a International group Origin which wants the
geographic identity to be the name of the subject. Not as easy as you
may think!!

For Example----As posted in alt.coffee this morning: "A tea blend
can become the signature of one's style, or that of an entire
restaurant chain, in the same fashion as one might favor Kona coffee
over French Roast."

Egads, as another poster in a.c. said: "That's pretty sad.
(Favoring strawberries over bad copywriters)".

aloha,
Cea
PS In case you were not aware, French Roast is NOT a geographical
coffee- it's a roast profile and could be made with Kona...


Micro environments, or terroir as the snobs might say, is very important
for agricultural products. When I was working in the winery biz I was
witness to some of the haggling with the BATF in trying to designate
AVAs. I wish you the best of luck.
D.M.
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Old 29-01-2010, 01:57 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default regulating food and wine names

pure kona wrote:

FYI, we are trying to get the same exact thing for real & 100% Kona
Coffee. There is a International group Origin which wants the
geographic identity to be the name of the subject. Not as easy as you
may think!!


Out of curiosity, where would the coffee have to be grown
to be called Kona? Anywhere on the Big Island?

Steve


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