General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
sue
 
Posts: n/a
Default Changing from an electric stove to a gas stove

Hi everyone.

As of Aug 11, I, along with my sweetie, will be first time homeowners!
We are really excited, the house is great, needs very little work, in a
great neighborhood, good sized yard, etc.

My only issue is the fact that it has an electric stove (which the
inspector says heatd to 50 deg hotter than the thermostat says, but he
showed us how to fix it). I grew up on th east coast and as a
transplant to the west (Utah) cannot understand the fascination with
electric stoves. For the past 10 years I have been fighting with
electric ranges, how they heat pans unevenly and therefore burn 1/2 the
foos before the other half is even brown, how the burners never sit flat
so all of the oil or other cooking liquid pools to one edge of the pan,
and I could go on.

Sometime in the next year or so we would like to switch to a gas stove.
I have no idea who I should call to see if this is a viable option. I
think it is because the utility room with the water heater and furnace
is directly below the stove in the kitchen. Do I call a plumber? The
gas company?

Any insight into this (or even insight on how to cook on the stupid
electric stove more consistently) would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance.

Sue
  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
zxcvbob
 
Posts: n/a
Default Changing from an electric stove to a gas stove

sue wrote:

> Hi everyone.
>
> As of Aug 11, I, along with my sweetie, will be first time homeowners!
> We are really excited, the house is great, needs very little work, in a
> great neighborhood, good sized yard, etc.
>
> My only issue is the fact that it has an electric stove (which the
> inspector says heatd to 50 deg hotter than the thermostat says, but he
> showed us how to fix it). I grew up on th east coast and as a
> transplant to the west (Utah) cannot understand the fascination with
> electric stoves. For the past 10 years I have been fighting with
> electric ranges, how they heat pans unevenly and therefore burn 1/2 the
> foos before the other half is even brown, how the burners never sit flat
> so all of the oil or other cooking liquid pools to one edge of the pan,
> and I could go on.
>
> Sometime in the next year or so we would like to switch to a gas stove.
> I have no idea who I should call to see if this is a viable option. I
> think it is because the utility room with the water heater and furnace
> is directly below the stove in the kitchen. Do I call a plumber? The
> gas company?
>
> Any insight into this (or even insight on how to cook on the stupid
> electric stove more consistently) would be greatly appreciated.
>
> Thanks in advance.
>
> Sue



You hire a plumber to put in the gas line.
Does the house have natural gas or propane or is it all electric?

You'll also need a 120V 15A (or 20A) grounded electrical outlet to plug
in the gas stove for the ignitors, and there's probably not one
available. There are ways to use the old electric range circuit for the
gas stove, but most of them are either unsafe or inconvenient.

Bob
  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
 
Posts: n/a
Default Changing from an electric stove to a gas stove

sue > wrote:
> Sometime in the next year or so we would like to switch to a gas stove.
> I have no idea who I should call to see if this is a viable option. I
> think it is because the utility room with the water heater and furnace
> is directly below the stove in the kitchen. Do I call a plumber? The
> gas company?


What does the furnace and water heater have to do with it? Are
they gas models? If so, then you should have no problem getting
a plumber to run a line up from there to your kitchen. If you
already have gas, then you probably don't have to contact the
gas company, but you might want to anyway as they sometimes have
special deals where they will sell you the gas stove and you
pay over time on your gas bill. Not always a good deal, but
worth asking about. If, on the other hand you don't have gas,
then you need to find out from the gas company about getting
service. Some companies will run the installation free if
you are hooking up more than one appliance, but that only covers
the outside portion, and you would still need a plumber for
the parts after the meter. At least that is how it works here
in Va. Could be different where you are. It may also be
different depending if you have natural gas or propane available.
If it is propane you may have a choice of competing companies,
and it pays to call around for the best deal. Natural gas
is pretty much like electric, you have to deal with the
company that has the lines in your neighborhood.

Bill Ranck
Blacksburg, Va.
  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
PENMART01
 
Posts: n/a
Default Changing from an electric stove to a gas stove

>Yes, the furnace and the hot water are natural gas powered.
>
>Sue


Then call your gas company. In most localities the gas companys (both natural
and propane) will be very happy to do the entire installaltion for another gas
appliance for free.. more revenue for them... they may even offer a discount on
gas usage if you then qualify as a "bulk" user. While you're at it have them
plumb your outdoor grill too... the conversion kit for switching gas types is
cheap, much cheaper than buying a new grill. Btw, in case anyone is unaware,
the extra orifices for converting a gas stove are in an envelope taped
somewhere to the underside of the appliance, it will also contain printed
instructions for the change over and an electrical schematic for the unit.
Generally you will need to pull the stove way from the wall to locate the
envelope (you'll need to do that anyway for refitting the regulator). Usually,
if you supply the kit, your gas company will be happy to do the conversion for
free, but they can also supply the kit in case yours is missing, probably under
$10... sometimes the kit is missing because the fuel type was switched
previously and the idiot threw away the parts.


---= BOYCOTT FRANCE (belgium) GERMANY--SPAIN =---
---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =---
*********
"Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
Sheldon
````````````


  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
PENMART01
 
Posts: n/a
Default Changing from an electric stove to a gas stove

>Yes, the furnace and the hot water are natural gas powered.
>
>Sue


Then call your gas company. In most localities the gas companys (both natural
and propane) will be very happy to do the entire installaltion for another gas
appliance for free.. more revenue for them... they may even offer a discount on
gas usage if you then qualify as a "bulk" user. While you're at it have them
plumb your outdoor grill too... the conversion kit for switching gas types is
cheap, much cheaper than buying a new grill. Btw, in case anyone is unaware,
the extra orifices for converting a gas stove are in an envelope taped
somewhere to the underside of the appliance, it will also contain printed
instructions for the change over and an electrical schematic for the unit.
Generally you will need to pull the stove way from the wall to locate the
envelope (you'll need to do that anyway for refitting the regulator). Usually,
if you supply the kit, your gas company will be happy to do the conversion for
free, but they can also supply the kit in case yours is missing, probably under
$10... sometimes the kit is missing because the fuel type was switched
previously and the idiot threw away the parts.


---= BOYCOTT FRANCE (belgium) GERMANY--SPAIN =---
---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =---
*********
"Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
Sheldon
````````````
  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Default User
 
Posts: n/a
Default Changing from an electric stove to a gas stove

sue wrote:

> Sometime in the next year or so we would like to switch to a gas stove.
> I have no idea who I should call to see if this is a viable option. I
> think it is because the utility room with the water heater and furnace
> is directly below the stove in the kitchen. Do I call a plumber? The
> gas company?



The first thing to do is check behind the stove to see if gas is already
plumbed in. Frequently kitchens have both available.



Brian Rodenborn
  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Dave Smith
 
Posts: n/a
Default Changing from an electric stove to a gas stove

sue wrote:

> Hi everyone.
>
> As of Aug 11, I, along with my sweetie, will be first time homeowners!
> We are really excited, the house is great, needs very little work, in a
> great neighborhood, good sized yard, etc.
>
> My only issue is the fact that it has an electric stove (which the
> inspector says heatd to 50 deg hotter than the thermostat says, but he
> showed us how to fix it). I grew up on th east coast and as a
> transplant to the west (Utah) cannot understand the fascination with
> electric stoves. For the past 10 years I have been fighting with
> electric ranges, how they heat pans unevenly and therefore burn 1/2 the
> foos before the other half is even brown, how the burners never sit flat
> so all of the oil or other cooking liquid pools to one edge of the pan,
> and I could go on.
>
> Sometime in the next year or so we would like to switch to a gas stove.
> I have no idea who I should call to see if this is a viable option. I
> think it is because the utility room with the water heater and furnace
> is directly below the stove in the kitchen. Do I call a plumber? The
> gas company?
>
> Any insight into this (or even insight on how to cook on the stupid
> electric stove more consistently) would be greatly appreciated.
>


It may sound like a stupid question, but do you have gas service at the
house? If you have a gas furnace and/or water heater, hooking up a gas line
for the stove shouldn't be too much of a problem, but you should have it
done by a professional. That may even be a legal requirement. If you do
not have gas, you would have to get one of those big tanks installed in your
back yard and have it trucked in. Another option that I explored was
propane, but that would have required the burners to be adapted for propane,
and additional costs.



  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Dave Smith
 
Posts: n/a
Default Changing from an electric stove to a gas stove

sue wrote:

> Hi everyone.
>
> As of Aug 11, I, along with my sweetie, will be first time homeowners!
> We are really excited, the house is great, needs very little work, in a
> great neighborhood, good sized yard, etc.
>
> My only issue is the fact that it has an electric stove (which the
> inspector says heatd to 50 deg hotter than the thermostat says, but he
> showed us how to fix it). I grew up on th east coast and as a
> transplant to the west (Utah) cannot understand the fascination with
> electric stoves. For the past 10 years I have been fighting with
> electric ranges, how they heat pans unevenly and therefore burn 1/2 the
> foos before the other half is even brown, how the burners never sit flat
> so all of the oil or other cooking liquid pools to one edge of the pan,
> and I could go on.
>
> Sometime in the next year or so we would like to switch to a gas stove.
> I have no idea who I should call to see if this is a viable option. I
> think it is because the utility room with the water heater and furnace
> is directly below the stove in the kitchen. Do I call a plumber? The
> gas company?
>
> Any insight into this (or even insight on how to cook on the stupid
> electric stove more consistently) would be greatly appreciated.
>


It may sound like a stupid question, but do you have gas service at the
house? If you have a gas furnace and/or water heater, hooking up a gas line
for the stove shouldn't be too much of a problem, but you should have it
done by a professional. That may even be a legal requirement. If you do
not have gas, you would have to get one of those big tanks installed in your
back yard and have it trucked in. Another option that I explored was
propane, but that would have required the burners to be adapted for propane,
and additional costs.



  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
HiTech RedNeck
 
Posts: n/a
Default Changing from an electric stove to a gas stove


"PENMART01" > wrote in message
...
> >Yes, the furnace and the hot water are natural gas powered.
> > While you're at it have them

> plumb your outdoor grill too... the conversion kit for switching gas types

is
> cheap, much cheaper than buying a new grill.


I constantly see cheap propane grills advertised in my area. Actually, 95%
of the grills I see at any price are propane. I have often thought I would
like to get one if I could make it work off natural gas, then I never have
to worry about running out, transporting, exchanging and storing tanks, etc.
But where do you get conversion kits for these cheap grills. Is there such
a thing as a universal or semi-universal kit that adapts natural gas to a
propane unit, or is it either the original factory has to make it or I'm out
of luck?




  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
HiTech RedNeck
 
Posts: n/a
Default Changing from an electric stove to a gas stove


"PENMART01" > wrote in message
...
> >Yes, the furnace and the hot water are natural gas powered.
> > While you're at it have them

> plumb your outdoor grill too... the conversion kit for switching gas types

is
> cheap, much cheaper than buying a new grill.


I constantly see cheap propane grills advertised in my area. Actually, 95%
of the grills I see at any price are propane. I have often thought I would
like to get one if I could make it work off natural gas, then I never have
to worry about running out, transporting, exchanging and storing tanks, etc.
But where do you get conversion kits for these cheap grills. Is there such
a thing as a universal or semi-universal kit that adapts natural gas to a
propane unit, or is it either the original factory has to make it or I'm out
of luck?


  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
PENMART01
 
Posts: n/a
Default Changing from an electric stove to a gas stove

>"HiTech RedNeck"
>
>"PENMART01" wrote:
>>
>>Yes, the furnace and the hot water are natural gas powered.
>>While you're at it have them
>>plumb your outdoor grill too... the conversion kit for switching gas types
>>is cheap, much cheaper than buying a new grill.

>
>where do you get conversion kits


Contact the grill manufacturer, most have a Website.


---= BOYCOTT FRANCE (belgium) GERMANY--SPAIN =---
---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =---
*********
"Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
Sheldon
````````````
  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
PENMART01
 
Posts: n/a
Default Changing from an electric stove to a gas stove

>"HiTech RedNeck"
>
>"PENMART01" wrote:
>>
>>Yes, the furnace and the hot water are natural gas powered.
>>While you're at it have them
>>plumb your outdoor grill too... the conversion kit for switching gas types
>>is cheap, much cheaper than buying a new grill.

>
>where do you get conversion kits


Contact the grill manufacturer, most have a Website.


---= BOYCOTT FRANCE (belgium) GERMANY--SPAIN =---
---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =---
*********
"Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
Sheldon
````````````
  #14 (permalink)   Report Post  
 
Posts: n/a
Default Changing from an electric stove to a gas stove

: cheap, much cheaper than buying a new grill. Btw, in case anyone is unaware,
: the extra orifices for converting a gas stove are in an envelope taped
: somewhere to the underside of the appliance, it will also contain printed
: instructions for the change over and an electrical schematic for the unit.
: Generally you will need to pull the stove way from the wall to locate the
: envelope (you'll need to do that anyway for refitting the regulator). Usually,
: if you supply the kit, your gas company will be happy to do the conversion for
: free, but they can also supply the kit in case yours is missing, probably under
: $10... sometimes the kit is missing because the fuel type was switched
: previously and the idiot threw away the parts.

As Sheldon is obviously unaware, most modern gas ranges can be converted
from NG to LPG by simply reversing the insert in the gas regulator, and
either opening or closing the burner air vents as necessary. No need to
look for envelopes containing Sheldon's orifice.
  #15 (permalink)   Report Post  
 
Posts: n/a
Default Changing from an electric stove to a gas stove

: cheap, much cheaper than buying a new grill. Btw, in case anyone is unaware,
: the extra orifices for converting a gas stove are in an envelope taped
: somewhere to the underside of the appliance, it will also contain printed
: instructions for the change over and an electrical schematic for the unit.
: Generally you will need to pull the stove way from the wall to locate the
: envelope (you'll need to do that anyway for refitting the regulator). Usually,
: if you supply the kit, your gas company will be happy to do the conversion for
: free, but they can also supply the kit in case yours is missing, probably under
: $10... sometimes the kit is missing because the fuel type was switched
: previously and the idiot threw away the parts.

As Sheldon is obviously unaware, most modern gas ranges can be converted
from NG to LPG by simply reversing the insert in the gas regulator, and
either opening or closing the burner air vents as necessary. No need to
look for envelopes containing Sheldon's orifice.


  #16 (permalink)   Report Post  
 
Posts: n/a
Default Changing from an electric stove to a gas stove

: cheap, much cheaper than buying a new grill. Btw, in case anyone is unaware,
: the extra orifices for converting a gas stove are in an envelope taped
: somewhere to the underside of the appliance, it will also contain printed
: instructions for the change over and an electrical schematic for the unit.
: Generally you will need to pull the stove way from the wall to locate the
: envelope (you'll need to do that anyway for refitting the regulator). Usually,
: if you supply the kit, your gas company will be happy to do the conversion for
: free, but they can also supply the kit in case yours is missing, probably under
: $10... sometimes the kit is missing because the fuel type was switched
: previously and the idiot threw away the parts.

As Sheldon is obviously unaware, most modern gas ranges can be converted
from NG to LPG by simply reversing the insert in the gas regulator, and
either opening or closing the burner air vents as necessary. No need to
look for envelopes containing Sheldon's orifice.
  #17 (permalink)   Report Post  
PENMART01
 
Posts: n/a
Default Changing from an electric stove to a gas stove

>Boob Merkin spews:
>
>As Sheldon is obviously unaware, most modern gas ranges can be converted
>from NG to LPG by simply reversing the insert in the gas regulator,


Some are reversed, others replaced... best read the instructions... oh, sorry,
yer an illiterate *******.

and
>either opening or closing the burner air vents as necessary.


Modern ranges have no air shuttles... you old *******, yer back in the days of
pilot lights.

No need to
>look for envelopes containing Sheldon's orifice.


You'd better change the orifice... anyone with a gas range can easily peer at
the little brass thingie with the hole in it where the gas comes out... you'd
better change that thingie. Boob Merkin, you are one dumb mother****er.


---= BOYCOTT FRANCE (belgium) GERMANY--SPAIN =---
---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =---
*********
"Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
Sheldon
````````````
  #18 (permalink)   Report Post  
PENMART01
 
Posts: n/a
Default Changing from an electric stove to a gas stove

>Boob Merkin spews:
>
>As Sheldon is obviously unaware, most modern gas ranges can be converted
>from NG to LPG by simply reversing the insert in the gas regulator,


Some are reversed, others replaced... best read the instructions... oh, sorry,
yer an illiterate *******.

and
>either opening or closing the burner air vents as necessary.


Modern ranges have no air shuttles... you old *******, yer back in the days of
pilot lights.

No need to
>look for envelopes containing Sheldon's orifice.


You'd better change the orifice... anyone with a gas range can easily peer at
the little brass thingie with the hole in it where the gas comes out... you'd
better change that thingie. Boob Merkin, you are one dumb mother****er.


---= BOYCOTT FRANCE (belgium) GERMANY--SPAIN =---
---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =---
*********
"Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
Sheldon
````````````
Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Kenmore Electric stove gets too hot jimmy martin Cooking Equipment 1 25-06-2006 05:02 AM
Need a Better Electric Stove Mike Danielson Cooking Equipment 35 06-06-2006 03:30 AM
Electric stove controller for electric smoker catfish Barbecue 1 12-05-2006 07:56 AM
Electric Stove Not Hot Enough Niel Cooking Equipment 5 23-11-2004 01:27 AM
Stove top grill - gas vs. electric Artisanwomyn Barbecue 8 16-06-2004 10:28 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 10:04 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2024, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2024 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"