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Old 01-03-2009, 08:33 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Easter cometh (natural Easter egg dying)

I've not made onion skin eggs since mom passed away. She's the one that
taught me that trick. :-) I'm currently saving the "paper" onion skins
that it takes to do it as I want to teach the method to my nephews.
I'll be sure to take pics this year.

Wrap raw eggs in dry onion skins, bind with cheese cloth and cotton
string.

Hard boil.

Unwrap, let cool and coat lightly with some cooking oil.

They really are quite lovely.
I'll try to take pics this year if I actually do it. It'll depend on the
babysitting schedule...

Anyone else use "natural" dyes for doing Easter Eggs?
--
Peace! Om

I find hope in the darkest of days, and focus in the brightest. I do not judge the universe. -- Dalai Lama

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Old 01-03-2009, 12:59 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Easter cometh (natural Easter egg dying)

Omelet wrote:

I've not made onion skin eggs since mom passed away. She's the one
that taught me that trick. :-) I'm currently saving the "paper"
onion skins that it takes to do it as I want to teach the method to
my nephews. I'll be sure to take pics this year.

Wrap raw eggs in dry onion skins, bind with cheese cloth and cotton
string.

Hard boil.

Unwrap, let cool and coat lightly with some cooking oil.

They really are quite lovely.
I'll try to take pics this year if I actually do it. It'll depend on
the babysitting schedule...

Anyone else use "natural" dyes for doing Easter Eggs?


Years ago I saw something on tv that really caught my
imagination. Similar to the onion skins, wrap the egg in
a red cabbage leaf. The egg wound up with a lovely pale
blue color with veining from the cabbage. Gorgeous.

Of course, I only tried it once, I don't normally do Easter
eggs.

nancy
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Old 01-03-2009, 01:37 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Easter cometh (natural Easter egg dying)

Omelet wrote:
I've not made onion skin eggs since mom passed away. She's the one that
taught me that trick. :-) I'm currently saving the "paper" onion skins
that it takes to do it as I want to teach the method to my nephews.
I'll be sure to take pics this year.

Wrap raw eggs in dry onion skins, bind with cheese cloth and cotton
string.

Hard boil.

Unwrap, let cool and coat lightly with some cooking oil.

They really are quite lovely.
I'll try to take pics this year if I actually do it. It'll depend on the
babysitting schedule...

Anyone else use "natural" dyes for doing Easter Eggs?


Hmmm. You may have convinced me to try this!

--
Jean B.
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Old 01-03-2009, 01:37 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Easter cometh (natural Easter egg dying)

Nancy Young wrote:
Omelet wrote:

I've not made onion skin eggs since mom passed away. She's the one
that taught me that trick. :-) I'm currently saving the "paper"
onion skins that it takes to do it as I want to teach the method to
my nephews. I'll be sure to take pics this year.

Wrap raw eggs in dry onion skins, bind with cheese cloth and cotton
string.

Hard boil.

Unwrap, let cool and coat lightly with some cooking oil.

They really are quite lovely.
I'll try to take pics this year if I actually do it. It'll depend on
the babysitting schedule...

Anyone else use "natural" dyes for doing Easter Eggs?


Years ago I saw something on tv that really caught my imagination.
Similar to the onion skins, wrap the egg in a red cabbage leaf. The egg
wound up with a lovely pale
blue color with veining from the cabbage. Gorgeous.

Of course, I only tried it once, I don't normally do Easter
eggs.

nancy



--
Jean B.
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Old 01-03-2009, 02:00 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Easter cometh (natural Easter egg dying)

On Mar 1, 7:59*am, "Nancy Young" wrote:
Omelet wrote:
I've not made onion skin eggs since mom passed away. She's the one
that taught me that trick. :-) *I'm currently saving the "paper"
onion skins that it takes to do it as I want to teach the method to
my nephews. I'll be sure to take pics this year.


Wrap raw eggs in dry onion skins, bind with cheese cloth and cotton
string.


Hard boil.


Unwrap, let cool and coat lightly with some cooking oil.


They really are quite lovely.
I'll try to take pics this year if I actually do it. It'll depend on
the babysitting schedule...


Anyone else use "natural" dyes for doing Easter Eggs?


Years ago I saw something on tv that really caught my
imagination. *Similar to the onion skins, wrap the egg in
a red cabbage leaf. *The egg wound up with a lovely pale
blue color with veining from the cabbage. *Gorgeous.

Of course, I only tried it once, I don't normally do Easter
eggs.

nancy


That sounds very interesting! I will try it this year and share with
my "Green Wednesdays" friends! - Rae


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Old 01-03-2009, 02:38 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Easter cometh (natural Easter egg dying)

Thanks!




On Mar 1, 9:22*am, "Nancy Young" wrote:
wrote:
On Mar 1, 7:59 am, "Nancy Young" wrote:
Years ago I saw something on tv that really caught my
imagination. Similar to the onion skins, wrap the egg in
a red cabbage leaf. The egg wound up with a lovely pale
blue color with veining from the cabbage. Gorgeous.


Of course, I only tried it once, I don't normally do Easter
eggs.

*That sounds very interesting! I will try it this year and share with
my "Green Wednesdays" friends!


I googled 'dyeing eggs red cabbage' and saw a couple of hits
right away. *First one was Martha Stewart, but she just used
the red cabbage to make blue eggs. *A different website mentioned
rubber banding the cabbage leaves to get that vein-y look.

If you do it, I hope it turns out well. *Of course, there are other
natural dyes aside from the onion skins and the cabbage.

nancy


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Old 01-03-2009, 03:03 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Easter cometh (natural Easter egg dying)

In article ,
"Nancy Young" wrote:

Omelet wrote:

I've not made onion skin eggs since mom passed away. She's the one
that taught me that trick. :-) I'm currently saving the "paper"
onion skins that it takes to do it as I want to teach the method to
my nephews. I'll be sure to take pics this year.

Wrap raw eggs in dry onion skins, bind with cheese cloth and cotton
string.

Hard boil.

Unwrap, let cool and coat lightly with some cooking oil.

They really are quite lovely.
I'll try to take pics this year if I actually do it. It'll depend on
the babysitting schedule...

Anyone else use "natural" dyes for doing Easter Eggs?


Years ago I saw something on tv that really caught my
imagination. Similar to the onion skins, wrap the egg in
a red cabbage leaf. The egg wound up with a lovely pale
blue color with veining from the cabbage. Gorgeous.

Of course, I only tried it once, I don't normally do Easter
eggs.

nancy


I'll have to try that in addition, thanks! I quit doing easter eggs too
for awhile until my sister moved back from Arizona. Now with the boys, I
have incentive again. :-) They are three and six and they've been
letting me babysit a lot more on weekends lately. I love it.
--
Peace! Om

I find hope in the darkest of days, and focus in the brightest. I do not judge the universe. -- Dalai Lama
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Old 01-03-2009, 03:03 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Easter cometh (natural Easter egg dying)

In article ,
"Jean B." wrote:

Omelet wrote:
I've not made onion skin eggs since mom passed away. She's the one that
taught me that trick. :-) I'm currently saving the "paper" onion skins
that it takes to do it as I want to teach the method to my nephews.
I'll be sure to take pics this year.

Wrap raw eggs in dry onion skins, bind with cheese cloth and cotton
string.

Hard boil.

Unwrap, let cool and coat lightly with some cooking oil.

They really are quite lovely.
I'll try to take pics this year if I actually do it. It'll depend on the
babysitting schedule...

Anyone else use "natural" dyes for doing Easter Eggs?


Hmmm. You may have convinced me to try this!


They come out marbled, sometimes with striations from the skin pattern
in yellow, orange and rust color.
--
Peace! Om

I find hope in the darkest of days, and focus in the brightest. I do not judge the universe. -- Dalai Lama
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Old 01-03-2009, 03:05 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Easter cometh (natural Easter egg dying)

In article
,
wrote:

On Mar 1, 7:59*am, "Nancy Young" wrote:
Omelet wrote:
I've not made onion skin eggs since mom passed away. She's the one
that taught me that trick. :-) *I'm currently saving the "paper"
onion skins that it takes to do it as I want to teach the method to
my nephews. I'll be sure to take pics this year.


Wrap raw eggs in dry onion skins, bind with cheese cloth and cotton
string.


Hard boil.


Unwrap, let cool and coat lightly with some cooking oil.


They really are quite lovely.
I'll try to take pics this year if I actually do it. It'll depend on
the babysitting schedule...


Anyone else use "natural" dyes for doing Easter Eggs?


Years ago I saw something on tv that really caught my
imagination. *Similar to the onion skins, wrap the egg in
a red cabbage leaf. *The egg wound up with a lovely pale
blue color with veining from the cabbage. *Gorgeous.

Of course, I only tried it once, I don't normally do Easter
eggs.

nancy


That sounds very interesting! I will try it this year and share with
my "Green Wednesdays" friends! - Rae


If you want to try the onion skins, mom would get extra ones from the
grocery store. The onion bins always have plenty of extra "shed" paper
skins which are what you need.
--
Peace! Om

I find hope in the darkest of days, and focus in the brightest. I do not judge the universe. -- Dalai Lama


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Old 01-03-2009, 03:43 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Easter cometh (natural Easter egg dying)

I haven't pickled eggs in a while, but when I did - beets and beet
juice. Eggs in the shell, but cracked. Pretty patterns.

B

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Old 01-03-2009, 04:09 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Easter cometh (natural Easter egg dying)

On Mar 1, 7:06*am, Omelet wrote:
If you do it, I hope it turns out well. *Of course, there are other
natural dyes aside from the onion skins and the cabbage.

Oh, what a great treat for my eldest grand daughter and her generation
to give to their Mom's already zealous Easter Day festivities. Each
year my daughter cooks big, and also plans the biggest easter egg hunt
(with prizes) ever, for not just her five twelve to twenty-three year
olds, but many of their friends as well. The three married "sets" of
grands are each having hard economic times, so this will be nice for
them to give back with. Thank you Om and Nancy, I've just "named" and
sent the following to the eldest gran, my Baker Babe, Tiara, and her
wannabe Chef husband....

We know what an Easter freak mom is, so here's something inexpensive
and you and Scott or your sisters can do for her. Surprise her the
day before Easter with setting a pretty bowl of these on her table.
Maybe even line the bowl with an entire bunch of fresh parsley....

Antique Easter Egg Dying

Start right now with saving the "paper" onion skins that it
takes to do this. Wrap raw eggs in dry onion skins, bind with
cheese cloth and cotton string. Hard boil. Unwrap, let cool
and coat lightly with some cooking oil.

They really are quite pretty. They come out marbled, sometimes
with striations from the skin pattern in yellow, orange and
rust colors.

Another lovely way to antique eggs is to wrap them in purple
cabbage leaves. No cheese cloth needed. String tie, or just
use rubber bands to fasten.

If you want to try the onion skins, get extra ones from the
grocery store. The onion bins always have plenty of extra
"shed" paper skins which are what you need.

Love you and of course I miss you BIG....Nana

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Old 01-03-2009, 04:57 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Easter cometh (natural Easter egg dying)



Omelet wrote:

I've not made onion skin eggs since mom passed away. She's the one that
taught me that trick. :-) I'm currently saving the "paper" onion skins
that it takes to do it as I want to teach the method to my nephews.
I'll be sure to take pics this year.

Wrap raw eggs in dry onion skins, bind with cheese cloth and cotton
string.

Hard boil.

Unwrap, let cool and coat lightly with some cooking oil.

They really are quite lovely.
I'll try to take pics this year if I actually do it. It'll depend on the
babysitting schedule...

Anyone else use "natural" dyes for doing Easter Eggs?
--


Does making 'tea eggs' count? The shells need to be cracked before
simmering in the tea/soy sauce/spices mix. The eggs come out marbled,
rather than the shells.

Ever try your method with red onion skins? Just curious.

The colours of eggs dyed with red cabbage can be manipulated to some
extent. Vinegar (acid) will keep it redder, more neutral solutions keeps
it purple, baking soda (alkaline) will turn it greener. No idea what an
egg steeped in baking soda would taste like, however LOL.
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Old 01-03-2009, 05:21 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Easter cometh (natural Easter egg dying)

Omelet wrote:

"Nancy Young" wrote:


I googled 'dyeing eggs red cabbage' and saw a couple of hits
right away. First one was Martha Stewart, but she just used
the red cabbage to make blue eggs. A different website mentioned
rubber banding the cabbage leaves to get that vein-y look.

If you do it, I hope it turns out well. Of course, there are other
natural dyes aside from the onion skins and the cabbage.


That is why I started the thread. :-) I imagine beet juice would
make a good pink shell?


Here's Martha's list, you're right about the beets:

Deep Gold: Boil eggs in turmeric solution, 30 minutes.
Sienna: Boil eggs in onion-skin solution, 30 minutes.
Dark, Rich Brown: Boil eggs in black coffee, 30 minutes.
Pale Yellow: Soak eggs in room-temperature turmeric solution, 30 minutes.
Orange: Soak eggs in room-temperature onion-skin solution, 30 minutes.
Light Brown: Soak eggs in room-temperature black coffee, 30 minutes.
Light Pink: Soak eggs in room-temperature beet solution, 30 minutes.
Light Blue: Soak eggs in room-temperature cabbage solution, 30 minutes.
Royal Blue: Soak eggs in room-temperature cabbage solution overnight.
Lavender: Soak eggs in room-temperature beet solution, 30 minutes. Follow
with room-temperature cabbage solution, 30 seconds.
Chartreuse: Soak eggs in room-temperature turmeric solution, 30 minutes.
Follow with room-temperature cabbage solution, 5 seconds.
Salmon: Soak eggs in room-temperature turmeric solution, 30 minutes. Follow
with room-temperature onion-skin solution, 30 minutes.




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