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Old 19-09-2006, 10:25 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default non-hydrogenated frying oils

I am looking for an oil to use for frying.

I don't want to use hydrogenated oils (notably Crisco and other
shortenings) because of health concerns.

The problem is that the liquid oils I have tried start to smoke or smell
rancid when frying.

Specifically I want something for frying french toast or pancakes.

Something that won't smoke or smell bad at frying temperatures.

Thanks.

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Old 19-09-2006, 11:01 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default non-hydrogenated frying oils


Matt wrote:
I am looking for an oil to use for frying.

I don't want to use hydrogenated oils (notably Crisco and other
shortenings) because of health concerns.

The problem is that the liquid oils I have tried start to smoke or smell
rancid when frying.

Specifically I want something for frying french toast or pancakes.

Something that won't smoke or smell bad at frying temperatures.

Thanks.


This is very new to me. Never heard of "frying" French Toast or
pancakes. Can you describe the process in more detail? I'm having
trouble picturing how you'd do either.

As for the oil, you can google for a list of smoke points of cooking
oils and find one you like with a high smoke point.

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Old 19-09-2006, 11:05 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default non-hydrogenated frying oils

On 2006-09-19, Matt wrote:

Something that won't smoke or smell bad at frying temperatures.


Refined canola works just fine for me. I use it for stir fry, too,
though I prefer peanut oil. You certainly don't need to hit 374 deg F
or higher for pancakes and Frenchtoast.

nb
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Old 19-09-2006, 11:11 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default non-hydrogenated frying oils

Matt said...

I am looking for an oil to use for frying.

I don't want to use hydrogenated oils (notably Crisco and other
shortenings) because of health concerns.

The problem is that the liquid oils I have tried start to smoke or

smell
rancid when frying.

Specifically I want something for frying french toast or pancakes.

Something that won't smoke or smell bad at frying temperatures.

Thanks.



The healthiest oil is olive oil. Add a pat of butter to a tablespoon of
olive oil for better flavor.

You don't actually "fry" french toast or pancakes! I don't think there's
any way to cook french toast or pancakes without accempting the lingering
aroma.

If you want to deep-fry, peanut oil has the highest smoke point but it
certainly will leave a stink behind if not super-well ventilated.

If you're really concerned about your health, what are you doing eating
french toast or pancakes, drowned in butter and maple syrup to begin
with?

But you asked...

Andy


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Old 19-09-2006, 11:34 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default non-hydrogenated frying oils

On Tue, 19 Sep 2006 21:25:40 GMT, Matt
wrote:

I am looking for an oil to use for frying.

I don't want to use hydrogenated oils (notably Crisco and other
shortenings) because of health concerns.


Check out the Crisco in the green can. It is no hydrogenated and has
no trans fats.
--
Susan N.

"Moral indignation is in most cases two percent moral,
48 percent indignation, and 50 percent envy."
Vittorio De Sica, Italian movie director (1901-1974


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Old 20-09-2006, 12:15 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default non-hydrogenated frying oils


Andy wrote:
Matt said...

I am looking for an oil to use for frying.

I don't want to use hydrogenated oils (notably Crisco and other
shortenings) because of health concerns.

The problem is that the liquid oils I have tried start to smoke or

smell
rancid when frying.

Specifically I want something for frying french toast or pancakes.

Something that won't smoke or smell bad at frying temperatures.

Thanks.



The healthiest oil is olive oil. Add a pat of butter to a tablespoon of
olive oil for better flavor.

You don't actually "fry" french toast or pancakes! I don't think there's
any way to cook french toast or pancakes without accempting the lingering
aroma.

If you want to deep-fry, peanut oil has the highest smoke point but it
certainly will leave a stink behind if not super-well ventilated.

If you're really concerned about your health, what are you doing eating
french toast or pancakes, drowned in butter and maple syrup to begin
with?

The healthiest way to do french toast is to deep fry it in cod liver
oil.

But you asked...

Andy


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Old 20-09-2006, 12:29 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default non-hydrogenated frying oils

salgud wrote:

This is very new to me. Never heard of "frying" French Toast or
pancakes. Can you describe the process in more detail? I'm having
trouble picturing how you'd do either.


http://www.m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionar...tionary&va=fry
http://dictionary.cambridge.org/defi...fry*1+0&dict=A
http://www.onelook.com/?w=fry&ls=a
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Old 20-09-2006, 12:45 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default non-hydrogenated frying oils

Matt wrote:
I am looking for an oil to use for frying.

I don't want to use hydrogenated oils (notably Crisco and other
shortenings) because of health concerns.

The problem is that the liquid oils I have tried start to smoke or smell
rancid when frying.

Specifically I want something for frying french toast or pancakes.

Something that won't smoke or smell bad at frying temperatures.



When I think of frying at high temperatures in oil, I think of deep
frying, as in deep frying french fries, or fish and chips, or tempura,
or fried chicken. For that, if you don't want a hydrogenated oil or
tropical oil, your best bet might be peanut oil-- not the dark brown
toasted one, but the regular golden yellow stuff. Still, you've noticed
what those in the fast food industry have noticed: the higher the oil
is in saturated fat and transfat, the higher the temperature the oil can
get to without smoking or smelling bad.


The higher the temperature can get, the better the fried food tastes.
You're always in a trade-off between taste and health. You can fry in
olive oil, but it smokes at a fairly low temp and doesn't last long.
Animal oils such as beef suet or lard make fried foods taste wonderful,
but they're generally considered less healthy because they're so high in
saturated fats. Tropical oils such as palm or coconut, are high in
saturated fat though they're vegetarian and not hydrogenated.


My compromise is to fry in corn oil when I fry at home and not to worry
about the oil when I eat out. I fry at home almost never, and I eat
fried food in restaurants only infrequently.


But you asked about french toast and pancakes. I don't normally think
of those as being deep fried though I suppose anything is possible.
(Actually, I did have deep fried french toast once, and it was quite
tasty.) French toast and pancakes are normally pan fried in a little
butter at lower temperatures. If you don't care to use butter, almost
any mild oil will do such as corn oil, safflower, canola, etc. Those
are what I use for vegetable sautees as well.


--Lia

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Old 20-09-2006, 12:49 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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The Cook wrote:
On Tue, 19 Sep 2006 21:25:40 GMT, Matt
wrote:

I am looking for an oil to use for frying.

I don't want to use hydrogenated oils (notably Crisco and other
shortenings) because of health concerns.


Check out the Crisco in the green can. It is no hydrogenated and has
no trans fats.


Are you sure that it's not hydrogenated? I believe you're wrong about
that. Please read the label and tell us what you find. As for having
no trans fat: If it's hydrogenated, it has trans fat despite the label:

http://www.bantransfats.com/newlabeling.html


New Labeling

In July 2003, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration ("FDA") announced that it would require mandatory trans fat labeling effective January 2006.

U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Tommy Thompson
(standing on the right) announces the new trans fat labeling rule in July 2003
Click on the picture to hear the announcement.

Starting January 1, 2006, all packaged foods must list trans fat content on their Nutrition Facts labels. Here is an example of the new label.

But watch out! There are two major problems with the new label, as noted below.

1. Under FDA regulations, "if the serving contains less than 0.5 gram [of trans fat], the content, when declared, shall be expressed as zero."

Suppose you eat one serving of Product A, one serving of Product B, and one serving of Product C. Let's assume that each product contains 0.4 grams per serving. You have just consumed 1.2 grams of trans fat, despite the fact that each of the labels claims that the products contain zero grams of trans fat per serving! Click here for an article about the less than 0.5 gram rule.

So be sure to check the ingredients list. If the words "partially hydrogenated" appear in the ingredients, the product contains trans fat. Also note that if the word "shortening" in the ingredient, the product probably contains partially hydrogenated oil which means that it contains trans fat.

2. Note that there is no percentage for trans fat in the "% Daily Value" column. There is just a blank space. The FDA had previously proposed to put an asterisk in the % Daily Value column with a note that "intake of trans fats should be as low as possible." However, in response to food industry pressure, the warning has been dropped. You should act as if the advisory is on the label. Eat as little trans fat as possible.

The FDA had previously proposed to put an asterisk in the % Daily Value column with a note that "intake of trans fats should be as low as possible." However, in response to food industry pressure, the warning has been dropped.

According to the label, you should eat no more than 20 to 25 grams of saturated fat each day. But what about the daily trans fat limit? That's right, there isn't one. According to the new label, you can eat as much trans fat as you want!

Health and Human Services Secretary Tommy Thompson told a news conference on July 9, 2003 that "trans fats are bad fats. The less trans fat you and I eat, the healthier we will be." We wholeheartedly agree with Secretary Thompson. So why no warning on the label?

The Nutrition Labeling and Education Act of 1990 states that the FDA “shall” require that the declaration of nutrients “be conveyed to the public in a manner which enables the public to readily observe and comprehend such information and to understand its relative significance in the context of a total daily diet.” By omitting the warning, the FDA is violating the statute.

* * * * *

Click here for the very informative FDA webpage on the new labeling.

http://www.cfsan.fda.gov/%7Edms/transfat.html#whatis

Click here for the FDA page on understanding the Nutrition Facts label.

http://www.cfsan.fda.gov/%7Edms/foodlab.html

Click here to read the comments that we submitted to the FDA on October 9, 2003 regarding unresolved labeling issues.

http://www.bantransfats.com/fdacomments.html


* Federal Register, Vol. 68, No. 133, July 11, 2003 at page 41466

http://www.cfsan.fda.gov/%7Elrd/fr03711a.html

© 2003-06 BanTransFats.com, Inc.

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Old 20-09-2006, 12:58 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default non-hydrogenated frying oils

On Tue, 19 Sep 2006 21:25:40 GMT, Matt wrote:

I am looking for an oil to use for frying.

I don't want to use hydrogenated oils (notably Crisco and other
shortenings) because of health concerns.


How about coconut oil? People claim it has health benefits. Here's just one
page on this: http://www.mercola.com/forms/coconut_oil.htm

The problem is that the liquid oils I have tried start to smoke or smell
rancid when frying.


According to this page:
http://www.goodeatsfanpage.com/Colle...mokePoints.htm
Coconut oil has a smoke point of 350 F, though it would depend on how
refined it is. There are other oils that are higher.

This page: http://missvickie.com/howto/spices/oils.html
Discusses the various oils you can fry with.

Don www.PaleoFood.com (e-mail link at page bottoms).


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Old 20-09-2006, 12:59 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Julia Altshuler wrote:
Matt wrote:
I am looking for an oil to use for frying.

I don't want to use hydrogenated oils (notably Crisco and other
shortenings) because of health concerns.

The problem is that the liquid oils I have tried start to smoke or smell
rancid when frying.

Specifically I want something for frying french toast or pancakes.

Something that won't smoke or smell bad at frying temperatures.



When I think of frying at high temperatures in oil, I think of deep
frying, as in deep frying french fries, or fish and chips, or tempura,
or fried chicken.


Thanks for your reply. By 'frying' I mean cooking in oil or fat, not
necessarily deep oil. Eg. fried chicken.

transitive verb
1 : to cook in a pan or on a griddle over heat especially with the use
of fat

Okay, what word do people use when preparing french toast? Hopefully
something more specific than 'cook' or 'make' or 'fix'.
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Old 20-09-2006, 01:31 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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The Cook wrote:
On Tue, 19 Sep 2006 21:25:40 GMT, Matt
wrote:

I am looking for an oil to use for frying.

I don't want to use hydrogenated oils (notably Crisco and other
shortenings) because of health concerns.


Check out the Crisco in the green can. It is no hydrogenated and has
no trans fats.


Here is the key point:

1. Under FDA regulations, "if the serving contains less than 0.5 gram [of trans fat], the content, when declared, shall be expressed as zero."


http://www.bantransfats.com/newlabeling.html
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Old 20-09-2006, 02:03 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default non-hydrogenated frying oils

"Matt" wrote:
The Cook wrote:
On Tue, 19 Sep 2006 21:25:40 GMT, Matt
wrote:

I am looking for an oil to use for frying.

I don't want to use hydrogenated oils (notably Crisco and other
shortenings) because of health concerns.


Check out the Crisco in the green can. It is no hydrogenated and has
no trans fats.


Here is the key point:

1. Under FDA regulations, "if the serving contains less than 0.5 gram [of
trans fat], the content, when declared, shall be expressed as zero."


http://www.bantransfats.com/newlabeling.html


I hate to break the bad news to you, but eventually you are going to die.
Happens to just about everyone as far as I know.

You have to balance the relative risks of various things in your life. You
are probably more likely to die in a car accident going to the store to get
your "not really zero trans fat Crisco" than dieing from using the this
Crisco. Maybe you should not fry to begin with. Not exactly the healthiest
way to prepare food. But you better not bake it either, or you'll die from
eating acrylimides formed from starches in that process. Better eat things
raw, but then you'll die from e. coli or samonella.

I use canola oil when I fry pancakes. I must use a significantly different
technique than you, because I don't run into any issues with smell or
smoking. I use a cast iron griddle over two gas burners on the stove, and
basically use the age old method of heating it until drops of water will
"dance" on the griddle surface to tell when the proper temperature is
reached. I don't see any smoke or detect any bad odors.

I do use shortening to make pie crusts. I switched to Crisco "zero" trans
fat this year from their standard product. Maybe it isn't completely trans
fat free, but it is sure a lot less than the standard product. The results
for this application seem to be identical to what I got before. I guess I
could use an all butter or a lard crust, but those aren't healthy either.
Maybe I should just give up pie? But this peach pie tastes so good!

I'd say go have a good stiff drink and relax... but you'll probably get some
liver problems from that. I guess there's just nothing safe these days.

--
( #wff_ng_7# at #verizon# period #net# )


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Old 20-09-2006, 02:36 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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wff_ng_7 wrote:

Here is the key point:

1. Under FDA regulations, "if the serving contains less than 0.5 gram [of
trans fat], the content, when declared, shall be expressed as zero."

http://www.bantransfats.com/newlabeling.html


I hate to break the bad news to you, but eventually you are going to die.
Happens to just about everyone as far as I know.


I hope you'll post again when people want to read something sophomoric.
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Old 20-09-2006, 02:52 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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The Cook wrote:
On Tue, 19 Sep 2006 21:25:40 GMT, Matt
wrote:

I am looking for an oil to use for frying.

I don't want to use hydrogenated oils (notably Crisco and other
shortenings) because of health concerns.


Check out the Crisco in the green can. It is no hydrogenated and has
no trans fats.


It seems that you are probably right about the trans fat, but wrong that
it has no hydrogenated oil. See my reply to Steve Wertz below.


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