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Old 18-03-2004, 07:08 PM
Tom Newton
 
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Default Built-in Grill Advice

Hi Folks -

We're building a new deck patio area and my contractor has agreed to create
a built in grill area at the corner of the deck. He has already run power
and natural gas from the house to the future grill location. All he needs
from me now is a grill!

Since this deck patio area is on the fancy side (and it's costing me a
bundle!), I've been looking into some of the more high end brands lately. So
far, DCS seems to offer the best package in either a 30 or 36 inch built-in
grill.

The current struggle I have is deciding between these two DCS units.

The 30" DCS is the BGB30-BQR - Street price... $1700

The 36" DCS is the BGB36-BQAR - Street price... $3000

As you can see, the price differential is huge. Here's what I've been able
to determine the 36" has that the 30" doesn't. Based on my research, and
talking to DCS, for the $1300 extra dollars... the 36" DCS gives you -

1. The larger surface (three 25k btu burners instead of 2)
2. A smoker tray with its own 3500 btu burner (no smoker in the 30"), and
3. Better grilling grates (fancy two sided grease control ones, versus
regular steel tube grates in the 30")

That doesn't sound like much for $1300. But before I decide, I wanted to get
some feedback on the value of an integrated smoker tray. I have never used a
smoker, but I'd love to learn. Can a smoker tray allow the grill to cook
certain foods, steaks etc... so they taste as though they were cooked over
charcoal? or are these just used to create beef jerky and other stuff like
that?

Also, does anyone have an opinion about the DCS two sided grilling grates?
Appearently, one side is great for greasy foods and the other side is
perfect for delicate stuff like flaky fish etc... are these new grates
really a nice to have, or is the standard steel grate in the 30" fine as is?

As for price, I am not that price sensitive at this point since the overall
cost of this outdoor area is already through the roof, so $1300 and getting
the wrong grill at this point is something I don't want to do.

Any help suggestions is appreciated.

Tom



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Old 18-03-2004, 07:36 PM
Kevin S. Wilson
 
Posts: n/a
Default Built-in Grill Advice

On Thu, 18 Mar 2004 14:08:11 -0500, "Tom Newton"
wrote:

We're building a new deck patio area and my contractor has agreed to create
a built in grill area at the corner of the deck. He has already run power
and natural gas from the house to the future grill location. All he needs
from me now is a grill!


Buy a Kamado with the gas option. It'll grill, bake, and smoke. Send
the money you save to me.

www.kamado.com

--
Kevin S. Wilson
Tech Writer at a University Somewhere in Idaho
"Anything, when cooked in large enough batches, will be vile."
--Dag Right-square-bracket-gren, in alt.religion.kibology
  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 18-03-2004, 08:10 PM
Jack Curry
 
Posts: n/a
Default Built-in Grill Advice

I suggest your read the faq http://www.bbq-porch.org/faq/default.asp for
this ng before you make any decisions, especially if you have any thoughts
about barbecuing and smoking, which differ completely from grilling. A good
familiarization with these cooking techniques might save you lots of money.

Jack Curry


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Old 18-03-2004, 08:37 PM
Radar
 
Posts: n/a
Default Built-in Grill Advice

On Thu, 18 Mar 2004 14:08:11 -0500, "Tom Newton"
wrote:

Hi Folks -

We're building a new deck patio area and my contractor has agreed to create
a built in grill area at the corner of the deck. He has already run power
and natural gas from the house to the future grill location. All he needs
from me now is a grill!

Since this deck patio area is on the fancy side (and it's costing me a
bundle!), I've been looking into some of the more high end brands lately. So
far, DCS seems to offer the best package in either a 30 or 36 inch built-in
grill.

The current struggle I have is deciding between these two DCS units.

The 30" DCS is the BGB30-BQR - Street price... $1700

The 36" DCS is the BGB36-BQAR - Street price... $3000

As you can see, the price differential is huge. Here's what I've been able
to determine the 36" has that the 30" doesn't. Based on my research, and
talking to DCS, for the $1300 extra dollars... the 36" DCS gives you -

1. The larger surface (three 25k btu burners instead of 2)
2. A smoker tray with its own 3500 btu burner (no smoker in the 30"), and
3. Better grilling grates (fancy two sided grease control ones, versus
regular steel tube grates in the 30")

That doesn't sound like much for $1300. But before I decide, I wanted to get
some feedback on the value of an integrated smoker tray. I have never used a
smoker, but I'd love to learn. Can a smoker tray allow the grill to cook
certain foods, steaks etc... so they taste as though they were cooked over
charcoal? or are these just used to create beef jerky and other stuff like
that?

Also, does anyone have an opinion about the DCS two sided grilling grates?
Appearently, one side is great for greasy foods and the other side is
perfect for delicate stuff like flaky fish etc... are these new grates
really a nice to have, or is the standard steel grate in the 30" fine as is?

As for price, I am not that price sensitive at this point since the overall
cost of this outdoor area is already through the roof, so $1300 and getting
the wrong grill at this point is something I don't want to do.

Any help suggestions is appreciated.

Tom



I have the DCS 36" model and I like it a lot. The grates are nice to
have and they work well. The smoker tray is also a plus, but it really
isn't a substitute for a "real" smoker. When I want to smoke some pork
shoulders, I fire up the Kamado for a day or two. When I just want to
grill some steaks and shrimp for a quick summer dinner, the DCS is
nice to have. The smoker tray may let you add a little more flavor,
but the food is generally not on the grill long enough for the smoke
to make much of a difference, at least the way I use it.

For my money, the most important difference between the two models is
the increased grilling surface. I'm always running out of space, even
on the 36" model. The other nice thing about the 36" model is that you
get three burners and can control the heat more precisely than you can
with the two burner model. This is especially nice when you want to
cook over indirect heat.
  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 18-03-2004, 09:57 PM
Edwin Pawlowski
 
Posts: n/a
Default Built-in Grill Advice


"Tom Newton" wrote in message
1. The larger surface (three 25k btu burners instead of 2)


Depends on the size of your family or frequency of parties.


2. A smoker tray with its own 3500 btu burner (no smoker in the 30"), and


It will be good for when you cook a chicken or pork roast to add smoke
flavor. I don' tknow that it willmake what we refer to as barbecue though.


3. Better grilling grates (fancy two sided grease control ones, versus
regular steel tube grates in the 30")


That is worth something but hard to put a price tag on.


That doesn't sound like much for $1300.


It is a #13200 upgrade today. It is a $3000 upgrade next year should you be
unhappy wihtt he smaller grill.


But before I decide, I wanted to get
some feedback on the value of an integrated smoker tray. I have never used

a
smoker, but I'd love to learn. Can a smoker tray allow the grill to cook
certain foods, steaks etc... so they taste as though they were cooked over
charcoal? or are these just used to create beef jerky and other stuff like
that?


It will add some smoke flavor. How much? Never u se the DCS so I can't
say. Steaks are usually coooked over very high heat with the lid open.
Ed

http://pages.cthome.net/edhome




  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 18-03-2004, 10:08 PM
[email protected]
 
Posts: n/a
Default Built-in Grill Advice

In rec.food.equipment Tom Newton wrote:

We're building a new deck patio area and my contractor has agreed to create
a built in grill area at the corner of the deck. He has already run power
and natural gas from the house to the future grill location. All he needs
from me now is a grill!


The current struggle I have is deciding between these two DCS units.


Well, if you aren't totally fixed on the DCS yet, may I suggest
you check out www.topgrill.com ? They have a very wide variety
of sizes and options, and will even custom build to suit if necessary.

I go one of their web specials a year or two ago and it is
and awesome gill. Not much good as a smoker, but from what
others are saying the DCS won't be either. Oh, by the way,
their 24" grill is as big or bigger than my old 36" CharBroil.

Bill Ranck
Blacksburg, Va.

  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-03-2004, 02:57 PM
Jack Denver
 
Posts: n/a
Default Built-in Grill Advice

At this pricepoint you are so obscenely far away from "value for the dollar"
that it's impossible to say whether another $1300 is money well spent or
not.

As the others point out, a gas grill cannot make "real" barbeque. That being
said, you can add a little smoke flavor to your food with some wood chips,
and if you use an indirect method (1 burner on, pan of water over the
burner, food over side where burner is not on) you can come close to the
low temperatures and moist heat needed for barbeque. But you don't need a
special built in smoke box to do this - you can even wrap the wood chips in
foil and rest them on the burner. You won't win any competitions this way,
but a gas grill can be used for more than just grilling steaks.

Ditto on the grates- the fancy ones are nice, but you could achieve the
same thing with a $5 perforated grate for delicate foods. For steaks,
burgers, etc. the standard grate is fine.


"Tom Newton" wrote in message
...
Hi Folks -

We're building a new deck patio area and my contractor has agreed to

create
a built in grill area at the corner of the deck. He has already run power
and natural gas from the house to the future grill location. All he needs
from me now is a grill!

Since this deck patio area is on the fancy side (and it's costing me a
bundle!), I've been looking into some of the more high end brands lately.

So
far, DCS seems to offer the best package in either a 30 or 36 inch

built-in
grill.

The current struggle I have is deciding between these two DCS units.

The 30" DCS is the BGB30-BQR - Street price... $1700

The 36" DCS is the BGB36-BQAR - Street price... $3000

As you can see, the price differential is huge. Here's what I've been able
to determine the 36" has that the 30" doesn't. Based on my research, and
talking to DCS, for the $1300 extra dollars... the 36" DCS gives you -

1. The larger surface (three 25k btu burners instead of 2)
2. A smoker tray with its own 3500 btu burner (no smoker in the 30"), and
3. Better grilling grates (fancy two sided grease control ones, versus
regular steel tube grates in the 30")

That doesn't sound like much for $1300. But before I decide, I wanted to

get
some feedback on the value of an integrated smoker tray. I have never used

a
smoker, but I'd love to learn. Can a smoker tray allow the grill to cook
certain foods, steaks etc... so they taste as though they were cooked over
charcoal? or are these just used to create beef jerky and other stuff like
that?

Also, does anyone have an opinion about the DCS two sided grilling grates?
Appearently, one side is great for greasy foods and the other side is
perfect for delicate stuff like flaky fish etc... are these new grates
really a nice to have, or is the standard steel grate in the 30" fine as

is?

As for price, I am not that price sensitive at this point since the

overall
cost of this outdoor area is already through the roof, so $1300 and

getting
the wrong grill at this point is something I don't want to do.

Any help suggestions is appreciated.

Tom




  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-03-2004, 04:08 PM
Tom Newton
 
Posts: n/a
Default Built-in Grill Advice

Thanks Jack -

Being from NY, I didn't know what barbeque means, but now I do.

In NY the word Barbecue is:

1) a verb meaning "to grill," and
2) a party or get together when you put things on a grill!

Actually, I shouldn't say I had no idea what barbecue means... I was in
kansas city last year, and had some real barbecue.... but I can't help
thinking barbecue is grilling related - sorry.

At any rate, I guess what I really want to do with the DCS, and what we
really do in our back yards around here is GRILL, over flame, all sorts of
stuff - especially burgers, dogs, steaks, corn, lobster, shrimp etc...

So I guess as I look at the 36" DCS versus the 30" ... the smoker box is a
relatively useless addition for people who grill or for people who "do
barbecue"

Tom


  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-03-2004, 04:59 PM
Dave Bugg
 
Posts: n/a
Default Built-in Grill Advice

Tom Newton wrote:
Thanks Jack -

Being from NY, I didn't know what barbeque means, but now I do.


This will help you even more, Tom.
http://www.bbq-porch.org/faq/default.asp

Dave


  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-03-2004, 07:17 PM
Jack Denver
 
Posts: n/a
Default Built-in Grill Advice

Yes, I agree - I grew up in Joisey and "barbecue" was a synonym for
"grill" - as in "I'll barbecue some hot dogs". There is a whole barebecue
subculture that takes its 'cue very seriously and calling a grill a barbecue
(the device or the process) is fightin' words.

Once you get your gas grill, with or without smoker box, you will find that
it can indeed be used for more than just grilling. If you learn the method
of "indirect cooking" it can do just about anything you could do with your
oven (plus add a little smoke flavor too). A lot of people get gas grills,
use them for burgers & steaks and little more and don't realize the full
potential of the device to do things like whole turkeys, etc.


"Tom Newton" wrote in message
...
Thanks Jack -

Being from NY, I didn't know what barbeque means, but now I do.

In NY the word Barbecue is:

1) a verb meaning "to grill," and
2) a party or get together when you put things on a grill!

Actually, I shouldn't say I had no idea what barbecue means... I was in
kansas city last year, and had some real barbecue.... but I can't help
thinking barbecue is grilling related - sorry.

At any rate, I guess what I really want to do with the DCS, and what we
really do in our back yards around here is GRILL, over flame, all sorts of
stuff - especially burgers, dogs, steaks, corn, lobster, shrimp etc...

So I guess as I look at the 36" DCS versus the 30" ... the smoker box is a
relatively useless addition for people who grill or for people who "do
barbecue"

Tom






  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 20-03-2004, 07:03 AM
Louis Cohen
 
Posts: n/a
Default Built-in Grill Advice

Make sure you get a rotisserie. Knowing the maximum size turkey you can
roto on each model might help you make a decision.

--
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
----
Louis Cohen
Living la vida loca at N37 43' 7.9" W122 8' 42.8"


"Tom Newton" wrote in message
...
Hi Folks -

We're building a new deck patio area and my contractor has agreed to

create
a built in grill area at the corner of the deck. He has already run power
and natural gas from the house to the future grill location. All he needs
from me now is a grill!

Since this deck patio area is on the fancy side (and it's costing me a
bundle!), I've been looking into some of the more high end brands lately.

So
far, DCS seems to offer the best package in either a 30 or 36 inch

built-in
grill.

The current struggle I have is deciding between these two DCS units.

The 30" DCS is the BGB30-BQR - Street price... $1700

The 36" DCS is the BGB36-BQAR - Street price... $3000

As you can see, the price differential is huge. Here's what I've been able
to determine the 36" has that the 30" doesn't. Based on my research, and
talking to DCS, for the $1300 extra dollars... the 36" DCS gives you -

1. The larger surface (three 25k btu burners instead of 2)
2. A smoker tray with its own 3500 btu burner (no smoker in the 30"), and
3. Better grilling grates (fancy two sided grease control ones, versus
regular steel tube grates in the 30")

That doesn't sound like much for $1300. But before I decide, I wanted to

get
some feedback on the value of an integrated smoker tray. I have never used

a
smoker, but I'd love to learn. Can a smoker tray allow the grill to cook
certain foods, steaks etc... so they taste as though they were cooked over
charcoal? or are these just used to create beef jerky and other stuff like
that?

Also, does anyone have an opinion about the DCS two sided grilling grates?
Appearently, one side is great for greasy foods and the other side is
perfect for delicate stuff like flaky fish etc... are these new grates
really a nice to have, or is the standard steel grate in the 30" fine as

is?

As for price, I am not that price sensitive at this point since the

overall
cost of this outdoor area is already through the roof, so $1300 and

getting
the wrong grill at this point is something I don't want to do.

Any help suggestions is appreciated.

Tom




  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 20-03-2004, 12:53 PM
frohe
 
Posts: n/a
Default Built-in Grill Advice

Jack Denver wrote:
you
can come close to the low temperatures and moist heat needed for
barbeque.


Moist heat - another urban myth.
--
-frohe
Life is too short to be in a hurry


  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 20-03-2004, 01:33 PM
Jack Denver
 
Posts: n/a
Default Built-in Grill Advice

Please explain ? Do you mean that they are wasting their money on the steam
injection ovens found in commercial bakeries?


"frohe" wrote in message
...
Jack Denver wrote:
you
can come close to the low temperatures and moist heat needed for
barbeque.


Moist heat - another urban myth.
--
-frohe
Life is too short to be in a hurry




  #14 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 20-03-2004, 02:15 PM
Buzz1
 
Posts: n/a
Default Built-in Grill Advice


"Jack Denver" wrote in message
...
"frohe" wrote in message
...
Jack Denver wrote:
you
can come close to the low temperatures and moist heat needed for
barbeque.


Moist heat - another urban myth.
--


Please explain ? Do you mean that they are wasting their money on the

steam
injection ovens found in commercial bakeries?


baking is scien ce and bbq is art--there is a difference
Buzz


  #15 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 20-03-2004, 04:09 PM
Duwop
 
Posts: n/a
Default Built-in Grill Advice

Buzz1 wrote:
"Jack Denver" wrote in message
"frohe" wrote in message
Jack Denver wrote:
you
can come close to the low temperatures and moist heat needed for
barbeque.

Moist heat - another urban myth.
--

Please explain ? Do you mean that they are wasting their money on
the steam injection ovens found in commercial bakeries?

baking is scien ce and bbq is art--there is a difference
Buzz


Maybe Denver meant "moist heat needed for baquing".

D
--





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