Chocolate (rec.food.chocolate) all topics related to eating and making chocolate such as cooking techniques, recipes, history, folklore & source recommendations.

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Old 19-01-2005, 02:30 AM
Janet Puistonen
 
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Default powder flavorings


"Debra Fritz" wrote in message
...
Hi all,

Has anyone used powdered flavoring to make truffles or other flavored
chocolate's?

I bought some flavoring powders from a local place ( Southern
California). They contain: flavor- depending on which one you choose,
dextrose and silicate.

Thanks,

Debra


I use real fruit purees, liqueurs, a few citrus oils, and for some flavors
infuse the cream with spices. (Not all at once, I hasten to add! G) I'm
trying to imagine if the flavors you describe would dissolve in cream, and
if they would taste "real." I tend to doubt it....although I have seen
powdered vanilla, which some people think is excellent (I haven't tried
it.).

What flavors are they?



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Old 19-01-2005, 05:34 PM
SC
 
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I just bought some powdered vanilla the other day. I'd never seen it
before and decided to give it a try. I have yet to try it but will let
you know how it works out when I do! Certainly smells good!

SC

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Old 21-01-2005, 04:21 AM
Debra Fritz
 
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On Wed, 19 Jan 2005 02:30:26 GMT, "Janet Puistonen"
wrote:


I use real fruit purees, liqueurs, a few citrus oils, and for some flavors
infuse the cream with spices. (Not all at once, I hasten to add! G) I'm
trying to imagine if the flavors you describe would dissolve in cream, and
if they would taste "real." I tend to doubt it....although I have seen
powdered vanilla, which some people think is excellent (I haven't tried
it.).

What flavors are they?


They offer a number of flavors. I got raspberry, lime and orange.

I too have tried fruit purees, liquors and infused cream, but was
told these powders offered a more real taste and none of the alcohol
taste you get in some liquid flavors and oils.

Debra


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Old 23-01-2005, 03:33 AM
Janet Puistonen
 
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Debra Fritz wrote:
On Sat, 22 Jan 2005 14:15:51 GMT, "Janet Puistonen"
wrote:


"Debra Fritz" wrote in message
...
On Wed, 19 Jan 2005 02:30:26 GMT, "Janet Puistonen"
wrote:



I can readily imagine that they are superior to liquid extracts and
liquid "flavorings," but how can they taste more "real" than real
fruit? (Stronger, certainly, if that's what you're after...)

Yes, actualy...I am after a stronger flavor. The last time I did
truffles, I used reduced fruit puree...By the time I got the flavor
level I wanted, I had compromised the consistency of the ganache. It
was usable, but not as firm as I wanted.


Debra, I make raspberry-ganache filled chocolates rather than raspberry
truffles for that very reason. The raspberry ganache is just too soft to use
otherwise.

--
Janet

Dear Artemesia! Poetry's a Sna/Bedlam has many Mansions:have a
ca/ Your Muse diverts you, makes the Reader sad:/ You think your
self inspir'd; He thinks you mad.


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Old 25-01-2005, 04:34 AM
Debra Fritz
 
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On Sun, 23 Jan 2005 03:33:06 GMT, "Janet Puistonen"
wrote:


Debra, I make raspberry-ganache filled chocolates rather than raspberry
truffles for that very reason. The raspberry ganache is just too soft to use
otherwise.


The ganache was usable, but I had to freeze it, then get it dipped
quickly.... It wasn't "runny", but close.

Perhaps I need to think about filled chocolates. I've not done that
before, but I wouldn't mind trying it.

What shapes do you use? Any easy ones for a beginner or are they all
the same level of difficulty?

Debra


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Old 25-01-2005, 01:55 PM
Janet Puistonen
 
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"Debra Fritz" wrote in message
...
On Sun, 23 Jan 2005 03:33:06 GMT, "Janet Puistonen"
wrote:


Debra, I make raspberry-ganache filled chocolates rather than raspberry
truffles for that very reason. The raspberry ganache is just too soft to
use
otherwise.


The ganache was usable, but I had to freeze it, then get it dipped
quickly.... It wasn't "runny", but close.

Perhaps I need to think about filled chocolates. I've not done that
before, but I wouldn't mind trying it.

What shapes do you use? Any easy ones for a beginner or are they all
the same level of difficulty?

Debra


Before I started using molds, I chilled the raspberry ganache too. But when
dipped, the covering came out dull and streaky because of the difference in
temperature.

On molds, the thing is that the heavyweight, rigid professional molds are
much easier to use than the flimsy things you see around in craft shops and
on most web sites. But they usually cost about $20, in contrast to the $2 or
so for the flimsy ones. The only mold I own that I consistently have a
problem with is a tilted teepee. So I would say avoid relatively tall,
skinny shapes, because air tends to get trapped in them. (That shouldn't be
difficult, because the teepee is an unusual shape. G)Very shallow molds
are also harder to use with a filling, for obvious reasons. Other than
that--go to some web sites and see what appeals to you. I've bought online
from J.B.Prince, Chocolat-Chocolat, and Kerekes (their web site is something
like www.bakedeco.com).


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Old 26-01-2005, 05:42 AM
Debra Fritz
 
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On Tue, 25 Jan 2005 13:55:14 GMT, "Janet Puistonen"
wrote:


Before I started using molds, I chilled the raspberry ganache too. But when
dipped, the covering came out dull and streaky because of the difference in
temperature.


I've made truffles a number of times and always chill the
ganache...and have never had a problem with dull or streaky coating.
My problem is always getting the depth of flavor I want in the ganache
and still being able to keep it "dip able".

On molds, the thing is that the heavyweight, rigid professional molds are
much easier to use than the flimsy things you see around in craft shops and
on most web sites. But they usually cost about $20, in contrast to the $2 or
so for the flimsy ones.


Thanks you..I've seen the cheap ones in couple of the stores I've
browsed in, but didn't know there was more than one kind.

The only mold I own that I consistently have a
problem with is a tilted teepee. So I would say avoid relatively tall,
skinny shapes, because air tends to get trapped in them. (That shouldn't be
difficult, because the teepee is an unusual shape. G)Very shallow molds
are also harder to use with a filling, for obvious reasons.


Ok, no teepee's I went to two of the web sites you mentioned
below and saw the rigid polycarbonate molds. I assume those are the
ones you were talking about because they were about $20.00....

They gave the sizes - one that I looked at was 30mm x 22mm....another
was 30mm x 20mm.....

I looked at my ruler that's in mm, and that must be the size of the
mold...not each piece. How do I know the depth of each piece so I can
avoid shallow ones? Or do I just need to use some common sense and
pick molds where the finished candy they show looks tall?

Other than
that--go to some web sites and see what appeals to you. I've bought online
from J.B.Prince, Chocolat-Chocolat, and Kerekes (their web site is something
like www.bakedeco.com).

Thanks.. I found J.B. Prince & Kerekes...they seem to have similar
things at similar prices. Did you find one of them to be better than
the other?

Janet, I really appreciate you taking the time to help me. I have no
idea what I'm doing, but it seems like something I'd like to try.

Thanks,

Debra

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Old 26-01-2005, 04:34 PM
Janet Puistonen
 
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"Debra Fritz" wrote in message

snip

They gave the sizes - one that I looked at was 30mm x 22mm....another
was 30mm x 20mm.....
I looked at my ruler that's in mm, and that must be the size of the
mold...not each piece.


No, that's the size of each cavity. 30mm is 3 centimetres, which is about 1
3/8ths inch. The second measurement would probably be the depth. Most of the
Chocolate World molds for individual chocolates come in two sizes, one with
about 24 cavities, one with about 32, depending on the size of the cavity.
(Of course, there are items of all sizes, some with only one or two cavities
per plate, and there are also double-sided molds.) If you visit the
Chocolat-Chocolat site, they give more precise information about the sizes,
including weight if filled with solid chocolate, which is a good way to
compare the overall size of each mold. They also have a larger selection.

I prefer the Chocolate World and Italian molds to the Cacao Barry, because
they are made from clear material, so it is easier to see when the
chocolates have released and are ready to unmold.






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