Chocolate (rec.food.chocolate) all topics related to eating and making chocolate such as cooking techniques, recipes, history, folklore & source recommendations.

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Old 18-12-2004, 06:34 PM
Scott
 
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Default Tasting chocolate

This is a somewhat academic question, but...
I was wondering if there was a proper order in tasting chocolate like
there is wine.

I just picked up two bars each of Scharffen Berger and Valrhona, one
each dark (~80%) and one each milk.

I thought that if you tasted the dark first then the milk, the latter
would taste overly sweet in comparison. Similarly, if the order were
reversed, the dark's bitterness would be exaggerated. Should I just let
a good amount of time pass between each sort?

Also, what's the best way to clear the palate between tastings of the
same sort/different brands of chocolate?

--
to respond (OT only), change "spamless.invalid" to "optonline.net"

http://www.thecoffeefaq.com/

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Old 18-12-2004, 06:41 PM
Geoffrey Bard
 
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Default

The absolute best way, in my opinion, is to allow a whole day to pass before
evaluating a new chocolate. This way your palate has no memory, and time
has helped prevent you from being biased against the new chocolate because
you remembered yesterday's.

Otherwise, probably the best method is to eat plain, warm polenta to cleanse
the palate.

Geoff

"Scott" wrote in message
...
This is a somewhat academic question, but...
I was wondering if there was a proper order in tasting chocolate like
there is wine.

I just picked up two bars each of Scharffen Berger and Valrhona, one
each dark (~80%) and one each milk.

I thought that if you tasted the dark first then the milk, the latter
would taste overly sweet in comparison. Similarly, if the order were
reversed, the dark's bitterness would be exaggerated. Should I just let
a good amount of time pass between each sort?

Also, what's the best way to clear the palate between tastings of the
same sort/different brands of chocolate?

--
to respond (OT only), change "spamless.invalid" to "optonline.net"

http://www.thecoffeefaq.com/



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Old 20-12-2004, 09:54 PM
Chef R. W. Miller
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Chocolate Tasting Etiquette

Preparation: Before sampling the chocolate, clean the palate by taking
several sips of water. Make sure the product has been stored at room
temperature (approx. 64-68 degrees Fahrenheit), in as little humidity as
possible. Eliminate all distractions, including radio, television,
newspapers, books, or loud music.

- The chocolate tasting should begin with subtle milk flavors, such as white
and milk chocolate, before venturing to the intense flavor of dark
chocolate.

Appearance: Examine the chocolate. The surface should be unblemished. The
surface should be smooth with a silky sheen. The color can range from the
ivory of white chocolate to the deep espresso-brown of dark chocolate.

Aroma: Inhale the chocolate aroma. Identify the clean, milky fragrance of
white and milk chocolate and the bittersweet aroma of dark chocolate.

Textu Take a small bite and notice how the chocolate feels on the tongue.
Quality chocolate should feel firm and have a "clean melt", with nothing
sticky, waxy, or sandy to stick to the roof of the mouth or cling to the
tongue, then melt away like butter.
Tests: Eat the chocolate slowly and try to distinguish the different flavors
of the chocolate and its fillings. Experience how the taste changes as the
chocolate melts away.

-The second step is to roll the chocolate around the tongue to make contact
with the four zones. The tip of the tongue senses sweet, the sides sense
salt and sour, and the back senses bitter.

Reflect and Repeat: After a moment reflect on the combination of taste ,
aroma, color and texture. Take a sip or two of water to clean your palate.
Continue eating the next bite slowly and consciously until the last trace of
aroma has disappeared.
-Be sure to limit your tasting to six different pieces in one sitting to
ensure your palate continues to sense the subtle deviations and differences
in the chocolate.
Enjoy
Chef R. W. Miller
Marriott Resorts & Hotels
"Scott" wrote in message
...
This is a somewhat academic question, but...
I was wondering if there was a proper order in tasting chocolate like
there is wine.

I just picked up two bars each of Scharffen Berger and Valrhona, one
each dark (~80%) and one each milk.

I thought that if you tasted the dark first then the milk, the latter
would taste overly sweet in comparison. Similarly, if the order were
reversed, the dark's bitterness would be exaggerated. Should I just let
a good amount of time pass between each sort?

Also, what's the best way to clear the palate between tastings of the
same sort/different brands of chocolate?

--
to respond (OT only), change "spamless.invalid" to "optonline.net"

http://www.thecoffeefaq.com/



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Old 21-12-2004, 05:44 AM
Alex Rast
 
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Default

at Sat, 18 Dec 2004 18:34:06 GMT in heimdall-6E1F63.13340618122004
@individual.net, lid (Scott) wrote :

This is a somewhat academic question, but...
I was wondering if there was a proper order in tasting chocolate like
there is wine.

I just picked up two bars each of Scharffen Berger and Valrhona, one
each dark (~80%) and one each milk.

I thought that if you tasted the dark first then the milk, the latter
would taste overly sweet in comparison. Similarly, if the order were
reversed, the dark's bitterness would be exaggerated. Should I just let
a good amount of time pass between each sort?


While it's best to let a good amount of time pass, preferably multiple
hours, when you're not in that position, the best order is milk chocolate
to increasingly dark chocolate.

It's definitely true that the flavour of the first will tend to influence
your impression of the second - thus indeed a milk after a bittersweet will
taste *very* sweet, a bittersweet after a milk will taste strongly bitter.
An 80% chocolate, incidentally, is invariably going to taste rather non-
sweet.

There's a second and more insidious level of accustomisation and bias that
can affect you. If you taste a bittersweet after having eaten mostly milk
chocolate for the past few weeks, its bitterness will seem exaggerated even
if you try it in isolation. The reverse is also true - a steady diet of
bittersweet will make all milk chocolates seem weak and sugary. So for the
very best effects, it's wise to mix it up from day to day, so that you're
not on a steady diet of one type.

Also, what's the best way to clear the palate between tastings of the
same sort/different brands of chocolate?


Make a very soupy mug of hominy grits (or polenta). It should have the
consistency of a slurry. And you should have it warm. I use a ratio of 8:1
water: grits. This is the old mexican way - this beverage is called Atole
and is/was traditional with chocolate. Take small sips between tastings. Be
sure to slosh it around in your mouth.

--
Alex Rast

(remove d., .7, not, and .NOSPAM to reply)
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Old 21-12-2004, 03:40 PM
Mark Thorson
 
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Default

"Chef R. W. Miller" plagerized:

Chocolate Tasting Etiquette

Preparation: Before sampling the chocolate, clean the palate by taking
several sips of water. Make sure the product has been stored at room
temperature (approx. 64-68 degrees Fahrenheit), in as little humidity as
possible. Eliminate all distractions, including radio, television,
newspapers, books, or loud music.


That whole thing was lifted from he

http://www.wwlp.com/news/segments/re...choctaste.html





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Old 13-02-2005, 07:07 AM
The Holdermans
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Chef R. W. Miller wrote:
Chocolate Tasting Etiquette

Preparation: Before sampling the chocolate, clean the palate by taking
several sips of water. Make sure the product has been stored at room
temperature (approx. 64-68 degrees Fahrenheit), in as little humidity as
possible. Eliminate all distractions, including radio, television,
newspapers, books, or loud music.

- The chocolate tasting should begin with subtle milk flavors, such as white
and milk chocolate, before venturing to the intense flavor of dark
chocolate.

Appearance: Examine the chocolate. The surface should be unblemished. The
surface should be smooth with a silky sheen. The color can range from the
ivory of white chocolate to the deep espresso-brown of dark chocolate.

Aroma: Inhale the chocolate aroma. Identify the clean, milky fragrance of
white and milk chocolate and the bittersweet aroma of dark chocolate.

Textu Take a small bite and notice how the chocolate feels on the tongue.
Quality chocolate should feel firm and have a "clean melt", with nothing
sticky, waxy, or sandy to stick to the roof of the mouth or cling to the
tongue, then melt away like butter.
Tests: Eat the chocolate slowly and try to distinguish the different flavors
of the chocolate and its fillings. Experience how the taste changes as the
chocolate melts away.

-The second step is to roll the chocolate around the tongue to make contact
with the four zones. The tip of the tongue senses sweet, the sides sense
salt and sour, and the back senses bitter.

Reflect and Repeat: After a moment reflect on the combination of taste ,
aroma, color and texture. Take a sip or two of water to clean your palate.
Continue eating the next bite slowly and consciously until the last trace of
aroma has disappeared.
-Be sure to limit your tasting to six different pieces in one sitting to
ensure your palate continues to sense the subtle deviations and differences
in the chocolate.
Enjoy
Chef R. W. Miller
Marriott Resorts & Hotels
"Scott" wrote in message
...

This is a somewhat academic question, but...
I was wondering if there was a proper order in tasting chocolate like
there is wine.

I just picked up two bars each of Scharffen Berger and Valrhona, one
each dark (~80%) and one each milk.

I thought that if you tasted the dark first then the milk, the latter
would taste overly sweet in comparison. Similarly, if the order were
reversed, the dark's bitterness would be exaggerated. Should I just let
a good amount of time pass between each sort?

Also, what's the best way to clear the palate between tastings of the
same sort/different brands of chocolate?

--
to respond (OT only), change "spamless.invalid" to "optonline.net"

http://www.thecoffeefaq.com/




So.... I guess a fist full of white chocolate truffles and a fist full
of dark chocolate truffles in the other hand.... washed down by
budweiser would be crude?
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Old 13-02-2005, 05:47 PM
monica robinson
 
Posts: n/a
Default

With reference to tasting, I have heard that the sound the chocolate makes
when breaking is important too, there should be a crisp snapping sound to
emphasis the quality of the chocolate

--
kind regards,

Monica Robinson
"The Holdermans" wrote in message
. com...
Chef R. W. Miller wrote:
Chocolate Tasting Etiquette

Preparation: Before sampling the chocolate, clean the palate by taking
several sips of water. Make sure the product has been stored at room
temperature (approx. 64-68 degrees Fahrenheit), in as little humidity as
possible. Eliminate all distractions, including radio, television,
newspapers, books, or loud music.

- The chocolate tasting should begin with subtle milk flavors, such as

white
and milk chocolate, before venturing to the intense flavor of dark
chocolate.

Appearance: Examine the chocolate. The surface should be unblemished.

The
surface should be smooth with a silky sheen. The color can range from

the
ivory of white chocolate to the deep espresso-brown of dark chocolate.

Aroma: Inhale the chocolate aroma. Identify the clean, milky fragrance

of
white and milk chocolate and the bittersweet aroma of dark chocolate.

Textu Take a small bite and notice how the chocolate feels on the

tongue.
Quality chocolate should feel firm and have a "clean melt", with nothing
sticky, waxy, or sandy to stick to the roof of the mouth or cling to the
tongue, then melt away like butter.
Tests: Eat the chocolate slowly and try to distinguish the different

flavors
of the chocolate and its fillings. Experience how the taste changes as

the
chocolate melts away.

-The second step is to roll the chocolate around the tongue to make

contact
with the four zones. The tip of the tongue senses sweet, the sides sense
salt and sour, and the back senses bitter.

Reflect and Repeat: After a moment reflect on the combination of taste ,
aroma, color and texture. Take a sip or two of water to clean your

palate.
Continue eating the next bite slowly and consciously until the last

trace of
aroma has disappeared.
-Be sure to limit your tasting to six different pieces in one sitting to
ensure your palate continues to sense the subtle deviations and

differences
in the chocolate.
Enjoy
Chef R. W. Miller
Marriott Resorts & Hotels
"Scott" wrote in message
...

This is a somewhat academic question, but...
I was wondering if there was a proper order in tasting chocolate like
there is wine.

I just picked up two bars each of Scharffen Berger and Valrhona, one
each dark (~80%) and one each milk.

I thought that if you tasted the dark first then the milk, the latter
would taste overly sweet in comparison. Similarly, if the order were
reversed, the dark's bitterness would be exaggerated. Should I just let
a good amount of time pass between each sort?

Also, what's the best way to clear the palate between tastings of the
same sort/different brands of chocolate?

--
to respond (OT only), change "spamless.invalid" to "optonline.net"

http://www.thecoffeefaq.com/




So.... I guess a fist full of white chocolate truffles and a fist full
of dark chocolate truffles in the other hand.... washed down by
budweiser would be crude?





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