Barbecue (alt.food.barbecue) Discuss barbecue and grilling--southern style "low and slow" smoking of ribs, shoulders and briskets, as well as direct heat grilling of everything from burgers to salmon to vegetables.

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Old 10-07-2005, 12:01 PM
Piedmont
 
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Default Zinc and barbecue, final word!?

Perhaps the final word on using zinc coated metals in barbecue. Two
commentary's on the subject as discussed on SPTSB~bbq List.


"Zinc fever or 'Metal Fume Fever' is caused by inhaling zinc oxide, not
metallic zinc, vapors. Zinc oxide forms when zinc boils (not melts)
which occurs at 907 degrees Celsius which is 1665 degrees Fahrenheit -
much hotter than most any pit temperature. This temperature is often
reached in welding which is the environment where the disease most often
occurs. Additionally, it usually takes several hours of exposure within
fairly close proximity to the welding to get the disease. It usually
goes away in a few days. I think it is HIGHLY unlikely anyone would
contract the disease during BBQing using galvanized metal. Also, the
disease occurs only on inhalation of the zinc oxide, it is not dangerous
(in small quantities) when consumed. You can find out a lot about this
by going to

http://hazmap.nlm.nih.gov/

choosing 'By type of agents', choosing 'metals', choosing 'Metals,
inorganic compounds', and then choosing 'zinc oxide'."

AND,

"The discussion on zinc and its oxide needs a little clarification. It is
not the gas from melting zinc that is hazardous. We don't cook that hot.
But galvanized metals are coated in zinc. The surface layer is oxidized
by O2 as well as CO2. That is why galvanization slows corrosion of the
underlying metal.

BUT... the zinc oxide and zinc carbonate layer will contaminate your food.

"It is unsafe to use any galvanized container for food preparation or
storage. Zinc can migrate from the container into your food and can be
toxic."

Barbara Willenberg, Nutritional Sciences, University of Missouri-Columbia.

Fron the zinc carbonate MSDS-

"Toxicology;

May be harmful by inhalation, ingestion or through skin contact."

Especially note this from the zinc oxide MSDS sheet-

"Repeated exposures to zinc oxide by skin contact have resulted in
papular-pustular skin eruptions in the axilla, inner thigh, inner arm,
scrotum and pubic areas [ACGIH 1991].""

--
Mike Willsey (Piedmont)
The Practical Bar B Q'r at,
http://groups.msn.com/ThePracticalBarBQr/_whatsnew.msnw



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Old 10-07-2005, 01:36 PM
D. Winsor
 
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Default


"Piedmont" wrote in message
...
"Mike Willsey (Piedmont)
The Practical Bar B Q'r at,
http://groups.msn.com/ThePracticalBarBQr/_whatsnew.msnw"

I've been trying to get on your MSN site with my Net.passport and it doesn't
seem to be working. Any idea what's going on? I just got a new WSM to
complement myy Charbroiler offset, and I decided to take the plunge for more
info.

I've got a real hankering for brisket, and found I can get it fresh
wholesale for $4.59 kg tomorrow. I've been making smoke for turkey, pork
shoulder and side rib with spares, but from reading here brisket is
ambitious. I've been making pin cherry log fires for a lit coal base before
adding lump and then smoking wood. I don't seem to be going too far wrong
with these meats, so I'm going to break in the WSM with brisket.




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Old 10-07-2005, 01:54 PM
A. Kesteloo
 
Posts: n/a
Default

It is not only the heat that is the problem. zinc will react with acid. I
will not place my meat on zinc.
if I would use a galvanized barrel where the meat or dripping does not get
in contact with the barrel (placed vertical without the steel bottom) I
would not care much about it and go ahead and use it.

Adriaan

"Piedmont" schreef in bericht
...
Perhaps the final word on using zinc coated metals in barbecue. Two
commentary's on the subject as discussed on SPTSB~bbq List.


"Zinc fever or 'Metal Fume Fever' is caused by inhaling zinc oxide, not
metallic zinc, vapors. Zinc oxide forms when zinc boils (not melts)
which occurs at 907 degrees Celsius which is 1665 degrees Fahrenheit -
much hotter than most any pit temperature. This temperature is often
reached in welding which is the environment where the disease most often
occurs. Additionally, it usually takes several hours of exposure within
fairly close proximity to the welding to get the disease. It usually
goes away in a few days. I think it is HIGHLY unlikely anyone would
contract the disease during BBQing using galvanized metal. Also, the
disease occurs only on inhalation of the zinc oxide, it is not dangerous
(in small quantities) when consumed. You can find out a lot about this
by going to

http://hazmap.nlm.nih.gov/

choosing 'By type of agents', choosing 'metals', choosing 'Metals,
inorganic compounds', and then choosing 'zinc oxide'."

AND,

"The discussion on zinc and its oxide needs a little clarification. It is
not the gas from melting zinc that is hazardous. We don't cook that hot.
But galvanized metals are coated in zinc. The surface layer is oxidized
by O2 as well as CO2. That is why galvanization slows corrosion of the
underlying metal.

BUT... the zinc oxide and zinc carbonate layer will contaminate your food.

"It is unsafe to use any galvanized container for food preparation or
storage. Zinc can migrate from the container into your food and can be
toxic."

Barbara Willenberg, Nutritional Sciences, University of Missouri-Columbia.

Fron the zinc carbonate MSDS-

"Toxicology;

May be harmful by inhalation, ingestion or through skin contact."

Especially note this from the zinc oxide MSDS sheet-

"Repeated exposures to zinc oxide by skin contact have resulted in
papular-pustular skin eruptions in the axilla, inner thigh, inner arm,
scrotum and pubic areas [ACGIH 1991].""

--
Mike Willsey (Piedmont)
The Practical Bar B Q'r at,
http://groups.msn.com/ThePracticalBarBQr/_whatsnew.msnw




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Old 12-07-2005, 01:24 AM
Piedmont
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Signing in on you Passport should do it!? For time being, I have configured
TPBBQ'r so that anyone can sign up without going through me. As far as I
know it should allow you to sign in with Passport, did you click on "join
now"

If you try it again and can't join let me know and I will look deeper into
it! Thanks for letting me know.

Mike Willsey

"D. Winsor" wrote in message
...

"Piedmont" wrote in message
...
"Mike Willsey (Piedmont)
The Practical Bar B Q'r at,
http://groups.msn.com/ThePracticalBarBQr/_whatsnew.msnw"

I've been trying to get on your MSN site with my Net.passport and it

doesn't
seem to be working. Any idea what's going on? I just got a new WSM to
complement myy Charbroiler offset, and I decided to take the plunge for

more
info.

I've got a real hankering for brisket, and found I can get it fresh
wholesale for $4.59 kg tomorrow. I've been making smoke for turkey, pork
shoulder and side rib with spares, but from reading here brisket is
ambitious. I've been making pin cherry log fires for a lit coal base

before
adding lump and then smoking wood. I don't seem to be going too far wrong
with these meats, so I'm going to break in the WSM with brisket.








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