Barbecue (alt.food.barbecue) Discuss barbecue and grilling--southern style "low and slow" smoking of ribs, shoulders and briskets, as well as direct heat grilling of everything from burgers to salmon to vegetables.

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Old 19-12-2009, 09:11 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Christmas Turkey?

Or Chanukah, Winter Solstice, Kwanzaa ...

Anybody doing smoked turkey this year?

I'm strongly leaning towards doing one this year cause they're
cheap and sooo easy. I'll be serving a big platter of Pork Tenderloin
Wellington but I need a major big hunk o meat to serve as the
real focal point.

I take a simple approach. Brine overnight in 1 C salt and sugar
per gallon. Light smoke at 250 F, then finish in a 500 F oven
for the last hour or so.

Serve with gravy made the day before. One thing I don't much
like is gravy made from smoked turkey.

I think I just talked myself into it.

--
Reg

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Old 19-12-2009, 09:26 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Christmas Turkey?


"RegForte" wrote in message
...
Or Chanukah, Winter Solstice, Kwanzaa ...

Anybody doing smoked turkey this year?

I'm strongly leaning towards doing one this year cause they're
cheap and sooo easy. I'll be serving a big platter of Pork Tenderloin
Wellington but I need a major big hunk o meat to serve as the
real focal point.

I take a simple approach. Brine overnight in 1 C salt and sugar
per gallon. Light smoke at 250 F, then finish in a 500 F oven
for the last hour or so.

Serve with gravy made the day before. One thing I don't much
like is gravy made from smoked turkey.

I think I just talked myself into it.

--
Reg


The last time I brined I used about the same salt & sugar concentration. I
added lemon juice to taste to give it a slight bit of acidity. I think this
made made the turkey taste much better. It gave it a very slight "bite". Any
vinegar obviously can be used to accomplish the same. Buy some turkey parts
at your local market and make stock if you don't have it on hand. I think a
richly flavored turkey stock gravy makes all the difference in the world.

Happy Holiday,

Kent





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Old 20-12-2009, 04:06 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Christmas Turkey?

On Dec 19, 3:26*pm, "Kent" wrote:
"RegForte" wrote in message

...



Or Chanukah, Winter Solstice, Kwanzaa ...


Anybody doing smoked turkey this year?


I'm strongly leaning towards doing one this year cause they're
cheap and sooo easy. I'll be serving a big platter of Pork Tenderloin
Wellington but I need a major big hunk o meat to serve as the
real focal point.


I take a simple approach. Brine overnight in 1 C salt and sugar
per gallon. Light smoke at 250 F, then finish in a 500 F oven
for the last hour or so.


Serve with gravy made the day before. One thing I don't much
like is gravy made from smoked turkey.


I think I just talked myself into it.


--
Reg


The last time I brined I used about the same salt & sugar concentration. I
added lemon juice to taste to give it a slight bit of acidity. I think this
made made the turkey taste much better. It gave it a very slight "bite". Any
vinegar obviously can be used to accomplish the same. Buy some turkey parts
at your local market and make stock if you don't have it on hand. I think a
richly flavored turkey stock gravy makes all the difference in the world.

Happy Holiday,

Kent- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


When we smoke a turkey I do it exactly like one inside in the oven.
The last time we did one, it was outside for 1 1/2 hours then came in
to finish where I could baiste it easily and often. The meat was
smokey and moist. I even stuff it just like inside.
Nan in DE
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Old 20-12-2009, 10:27 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Christmas Turkey?


"RegForte" wrote in message
...
Or Chanukah, Winter Solstice, Kwanzaa ...

Anybody doing smoked turkey this year?

I'm strongly leaning towards doing one this year cause they're
cheap and sooo easy. I'll be serving a big platter of Pork Tenderloin
Wellington but I need a major big hunk o meat to serve as the
real focal point.

I take a simple approach. Brine overnight in 1 C salt and sugar
per gallon. Light smoke at 250 F, then finish in a 500 F oven
for the last hour or so.

Serve with gravy made the day before. One thing I don't much
like is gravy made from smoked turkey.

I think I just talked myself into it.

--
Reg


Head down to the Lucas delicatessen on Valencia St. in SF, buy a pound of
dried A grade porcini mushrooms. They have it for an excellent price.
Mix 1/2 cup dried porcinis with water to hydrate. Pour off porcini stock and
add it to the stock that you're going to use to hydrate your stuffing; this
is very important. Make your stuffing with soaked porcinis, giblets, and
whatever you choose. As I've said in the past I think always works better if
it's baked separate from the turkey. The stock, however, is important. I
wonder how much flavor seeps from the cavity wall into the stuffing inside
the turkey. I'll bet not much.

Kent



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Old 21-12-2009, 08:09 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Christmas Turkey?

Kent wrote:

"RegForte" wrote in message
...

Or Chanukah, Winter Solstice, Kwanzaa ...

Anybody doing smoked turkey this year?

I'm strongly leaning towards doing one this year cause they're
cheap and sooo easy. I'll be serving a big platter of Pork Tenderloin
Wellington but I need a major big hunk o meat to serve as the
real focal point.

I take a simple approach. Brine overnight in 1 C salt and sugar
per gallon. Light smoke at 250 F, then finish in a 500 F oven
for the last hour or so.

Serve with gravy made the day before. One thing I don't much
like is gravy made from smoked turkey.

I think I just talked myself into it.


Head down to the Lucas delicatessen on Valencia St. in SF, buy a pound of
dried A grade porcini mushrooms. They have it for an excellent price.
Mix 1/2 cup dried porcinis with water to hydrate. Pour off porcini stock and
add it to the stock that you're going to use to hydrate your stuffing; this
is very important. Make your stuffing with soaked porcinis, giblets, and
whatever you choose. As I've said in the past I think always works better if
it's baked separate from the turkey. The stock, however, is important. I
wonder how much flavor seeps from the cavity wall into the stuffing inside
the turkey. I'll bet not much.


Luca's is precious. The only thing I ever liked about living in The
Mission was being near that place.

I love the mushroom idea. I wish the wife didn't hate them. It's
one of the few major incompatibilities between us. I cook them when
she's not around.

The only area you and I differ is with the idea of putting citrus juice,
or anything acidic, in a brine. Most additional brine ingredients
do no harm, but they also have little or no effect. Acidic stuff
can actually do damage by making the meat mushy, especially if you
leave it in too long. One thing I like about brines is you (should)
have a little leeway in your soak time.

Happy Holidays!

--
Reg


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Old 21-12-2009, 08:48 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Christmas Turkey?

Seems like the brine thread came up not too long ago... maybe not. I
think brines improve the texture, but don't do much for flavor.

I brine when I have a chance, but it is pretty much just salt, water,
maybe some sugar when I do. That's it. Extensive, side-by-side
testing on my part with chicken revealed no taste change in simple
brines vs. those 15 ingredient marinates folks make.

For me, the old fashioned way works the best. Soften butter and add
some salt, black pepper, sage, oregano and rosemary.

Make a paste. Gently lift the skin over the bird and put as much of
the paste as you can under the skin, all over the bird.

Take the remaining paste and rub it all over the turkey. Put it in
the smoker with a pan underneath to catch the butter/herb seasoned
drippings.

Cook at 350F in the smoker. Since there is no tough muscle to break
down and your butter will keep the meat moist, 300 - 350F works
great. I allow about 20-25 minutes a pound but check with a thermo to
be sure. I only baste about 1/2 way through, and it's with any butter
paste mixture I have left over.

For me and the missus, I let it sit for about 15 minutes or so while
getting the rest of the meal ready. We don't eat the skin.

But for company/family/presentation purposes, when it is finished
cooking on the smoker, I take the bird in the house and put it in a
preheated oven set at 450. This will crisp the skin nicely, and make
it uniformly brown.

Couldn't be easier.

Robert
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Old 21-12-2009, 11:43 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Christmas Turkey?


"RegForte" wrote in message
...
Kent wrote:

"RegForte" wrote in message
...

Or Chanukah, Winter Solstice, Kwanzaa ...

Anybody doing smoked turkey this year?

I'm strongly leaning towards doing one this year cause they're
cheap and sooo easy. I'll be serving a big platter of Pork Tenderloin
Wellington but I need a major big hunk o meat to serve as the
real focal point.

I take a simple approach. Brine overnight in 1 C salt and sugar
per gallon. Light smoke at 250 F, then finish in a 500 F oven
for the last hour or so.

Serve with gravy made the day before. One thing I don't much
like is gravy made from smoked turkey.

I think I just talked myself into it.


Head down to the Lucas delicatessen on Valencia St. in SF, buy a pound of
dried A grade porcini mushrooms. They have it for an excellent price.
Mix 1/2 cup dried porcinis with water to hydrate. Pour off porcini stock
and add it to the stock that you're going to use to hydrate your
stuffing; this is very important. Make your stuffing with soaked
porcinis, giblets, and whatever you choose. As I've said in the past I
think always works better if it's baked separate from the turkey. The
stock, however, is important. I wonder how much flavor seeps from the
cavity wall into the stuffing inside the turkey. I'll bet not much.


Luca's is precious. The only thing I ever liked about living in The
Mission was being near that place.

I love the mushroom idea. I wish the wife didn't hate them. It's
one of the few major incompatibilities between us. I cook them when
she's not around.

The only area you and I differ is with the idea of putting citrus juice,
or anything acidic, in a brine. Most additional brine ingredients
do no harm, but they also have little or no effect. Acidic stuff
can actually do damage by making the meat mushy, especially if you
leave it in too long. One thing I like about brines is you (should)
have a little leeway in your soak time.

Happy Holidays!

--
Reg


I've only tried the acidic addition once, on this last turkey. I used a very
small amount of lemon juice relative to the total volume of brine. I suspect
the ph change to the acidic side was pretty marginal. As I said before, both
my wife and I thought it gave the turkey a taste it didn't have before, all
for the positive.

Regarding the mushrooms, porcinis have a fairly assertive taste, just what
turkey stuffing benefits from . What you might consider trying, if you
haven't already, is to hunt down some dried Morels. They have a more
delicate taste. They hydrate very well. They're expensive, though it takes a
long time to get through a pound. As with most dried mushrooms, after
soaking, we dry them and sauté them in butter before doing anything. They
can, however, go directly into a turkey stuffing without sautéing.

I just realized that in the Embarkacaro there is a mushroom vendor with a
wide variety. His prices are slightly on the high side. His products,
however, look very good.

Happy Holidays to you and those near to you,

Kent





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Old 21-12-2009, 11:50 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Christmas Turkey?


wrote in message
...
Seems like the brine thread came up not too long ago... maybe not. I
think brines improve the texture, but don't do much for flavor.

I brine when I have a chance, but it is pretty much just salt, water,
maybe some sugar when I do. That's it. Extensive, side-by-side
testing on my part with chicken revealed no taste change in simple
brines vs. those 15 ingredient marinates folks make.

For me, the old fashioned way works the best. Soften butter and add
some salt, black pepper, sage, oregano and rosemary.

Make a paste. Gently lift the skin over the bird and put as much of
the paste as you can under the skin, all over the bird.

Take the remaining paste and rub it all over the turkey. Put it in
the smoker with a pan underneath to catch the butter/herb seasoned
drippings.

Cook at 350F in the smoker. Since there is no tough muscle to break
down and your butter will keep the meat moist, 300 - 350F works
great. I allow about 20-25 minutes a pound but check with a thermo to
be sure. I only baste about 1/2 way through, and it's with any butter
paste mixture I have left over.

For me and the missus, I let it sit for about 15 minutes or so while
getting the rest of the meal ready. We don't eat the skin.

But for company/family/presentation purposes, when it is finished
cooking on the smoker, I take the bird in the house and put it in a
preheated oven set at 450. This will crisp the skin nicely, and make
it uniformly brown.

Couldn't be easier.

Robert


I agree about brine ingredients having little effect. I think it's mainly
salt and sugar, and at what concentration. If I add seasonings, I add only
assertive seasonings, like allspice, juniper, clove, etc. Grind seasonings
in a mortar and pestle, and then "cook" in a microwave with one cup of water
for several minutes. Add that to your brine solution.

Kent





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Old 22-12-2009, 03:50 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Christmas Turkey?

In article ,
"Kent" wrote:

I agree about brine ingredients having little effect. I think it's mainly
salt and sugar, and at what concentration. If I add seasonings, I add only
assertive seasonings, like allspice, juniper, clove, etc. Grind seasonings
in a mortar and pestle, and then "cook" in a microwave with one cup of water
for several minutes. Add that to your brine solution.

Kent


I've been experimenting with meat curing (mostly pork) and when I make
up my curing soak, I use raw sugar, sea salt, curing salts and various
spices such as garlic powder, basil, etc.

I put it all into the pressure cooker and bring it up to pressure to
melt all the sugar and salt, and make more of less of a "tea" with the
rest of the flavorings.

Trust me, this adds _lots_ of additional flavoring to my meat. But, my
brining times for projects like that are never any less than 5 days...

I've not tried it yet with poultry, but I ruined a hunk of beef with it.
Too much salt stayed in the beef. Guess I should have re-soaked it prior
to smoking it.

The pork I've done on the other hand was fantastic. See my Canadian
Bacon pics in my sig links.
--
Peace! Om

"Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
--Steve Rothstein

Web Albums: http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet

Subscribe:

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Old 22-12-2009, 11:09 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Christmas Turkey?


"Omelet" wrote in message
news
In article ,
"Kent" wrote:

I agree about brine ingredients having little effect. I think it's mainly
salt and sugar, and at what concentration. If I add seasonings, I add
only
assertive seasonings, like allspice, juniper, clove, etc. Grind
seasonings
in a mortar and pestle, and then "cook" in a microwave with one cup of
water
for several minutes. Add that to your brine solution.

Kent


I've been experimenting with meat curing (mostly pork) and when I make
up my curing soak, I use raw sugar, sea salt, curing salts and various
spices such as garlic powder, basil, etc.

I put it all into the pressure cooker and bring it up to pressure to
melt all the sugar and salt, and make more of less of a "tea" with the
rest of the flavorings.

Trust me, this adds _lots_ of additional flavoring to my meat. But, my
brining times for projects like that are never any less than 5 days...

I've not tried it yet with poultry, but I ruined a hunk of beef with it.
Too much salt stayed in the beef. Guess I should have re-soaked it prior
to smoking it.

The pork I've done on the other hand was fantastic. See my Canadian
Bacon pics in my sig links.
--
Peace! Om

"Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their
foot down."
--Steve Rothstein

Web Albums: http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet

Subscribe:



What curing product/agent are you using? I've played with Morton's
Tenderquick a bit. I'd like to find a nitrate/nitrite product for brine
curing.
Thanks,
Kent





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Old 22-12-2009, 02:46 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Christmas Turkey?

In article ,
"Kent" wrote:

What curing product/agent are you using? I've played with Morton's
Tenderquick a bit. I'd like to find a nitrate/nitrite product for brine
curing.
Thanks,
Kent


I'm experimenting with Potassium Nitrate. 1 part Salt Petre to 15 parts
gray (mineral) salt, adding 2 tablespoons of that mix per gallon of
brine.

It's worked well.
--
Peace! Om

"Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
--Steve Rothstein

Web Albums: http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet

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Old 23-12-2009, 08:19 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Christmas Turkey?


"Sqwertz" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 22 Dec 2009 02:09:15 -0800, Kent wrote:

What curing product/agent are you using? I've played with Morton's
Tenderquick a bit. I'd like to find a nitrate/nitrite product for brine
curing.


Moron. Have you read the god damn bag - the part where it has
directions for brining? And yes, it's always been there.

http://www.sausagesource.com/catalog/mrtn-tndrqk.html

Please don't engage this asshole in any discussion of curing. Or
anything else for that matter. It's the same stupid questionS year
after year. And if you tell him you use saltpeter, then it will
only last another 10 years.

-sw


Sqwertz, I'd really like to know what OM is doing and how it works for her.
There's nothing wrong with that. She's very accomplished; she's obviously
done her homework; I'm sure she has insight that has more value than what's
in the ad above.That's what a NG is about.

What comes back, unfortunately, is your spewing. Is it from your pen? Is it
a burp from your mouth? Is it a low frequency monosyllabic uttering from
your anus, or is it one of those rare moments of expression from the tip of
your penis when it's trying to do something else?

You're one of a small number of vitreofiles who have made this NG die. You
know that, of course.

The URL you refer to above doesn't answer the question. No one uses
Tenderquick for anything other than dry curing. It doesn't make sense. My
reference to it was a parenthetical reference to curing. You know that, of
course.

What's it like to be a eunich?









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Old 23-12-2009, 08:21 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Christmas Turkey?


"Nick Cramer" wrote in message
...
Sqwertz wrote:
[ . . . ]
Please don't engage this asshole in any discussion of curing. Or
anything else for that matter. It's the same stupid questionS year
after year. And if you tell him you use saltpeter, then it will
only last another 10 years.


sigh K*nt is one of the Charter Members of my Bozo Bin. Of his posts, I
only see what others have quoted.

--
Nick, KI6VAV. Support severely wounded and disabled Veterans and their
families: https://www.woundedwarriorproject.org/ Thank a Veteran!
Support Our Troops: http://anymarine.com/ You are not forgotten.
Thanks ! ! ~Semper Fi~ USMC 1365061


I'm saddened when I see one obviously with reasonable brain power who has
his head in the sand. This is exactly what happened in Germany in the
1930's.





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Old 23-12-2009, 09:17 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Posts: 3,622
Default Christmas Turkey?

Kent wrote:
"Nick Cramer" wrote in message
...
Sqwertz wrote:
[ . . . ]
Please don't engage this asshole in any discussion of curing. Or
anything else for that matter. It's the same stupid questionS year
after year. And if you tell him you use saltpeter, then it will
only last another 10 years.


sigh K*nt is one of the Charter Members of my Bozo Bin. Of his
posts, I only see what others have quoted.

--
Nick, KI6VAV. Support severely wounded and disabled Veterans and
their families: https://www.woundedwarriorproject.org/ Thank a
Veteran! Support Our Troops: http://anymarine.com/ You are not
forgotten. Thanks ! ! ~Semper Fi~ USMC
1365061

I'm saddened when I see one obviously with reasonable brain power who
has his head in the sand. This is exactly what happened in Germany in
the 1930's.


Kent, you're priceless. Only you could make a reach around like that. Now,
FOAD.
--
Dave
What is best in life? "To crush your enemies, see them driven before
you, and to hear the lamentation of the women." -- Conan


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Old 23-12-2009, 09:24 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Christmas Turkey?

Kent wrote:
"Sqwertz" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 22 Dec 2009 02:09:15 -0800, Kent wrote:

What curing product/agent are you using? I've played with Morton's
Tenderquick a bit. I'd like to find a nitrate/nitrite product for
brine curing.


Moron. Have you read the god damn bag - the part where it has
directions for brining? And yes, it's always been there.

http://www.sausagesource.com/catalog/mrtn-tndrqk.html

Please don't engage this asshole in any discussion of curing. Or
anything else for that matter. It's the same stupid questionS year
after year. And if you tell him you use saltpeter, then it will
only last another 10 years.

-sw


Sqwertz, I'd really like to know what OM is doing and how it works
for her...... Blah, blah, blah


Steve is right; you are a pretentious prick who wouldn't know saltpeter from
his own peter. Look up 'tedious' in the thesaurus and 'Kent' is listed right
along with the other suggested word substitutions. Now, FOAD.



--
Dave
What is best in life? "To crush your enemies, see them driven before
you, and to hear the lamentation of the women." -- Conan




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